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The Man I Love


List Price: $19.99
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Product Details

  • Actors: Ida Lupino, Robert Alda, Andrea King, Martha Vickers, Bruce Bennett
  • Directors: Raoul Walsh
  • Format: NTSC
  • Language: English
  • Region: All Regions
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.33:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated: NR (Not Rated)
  • Studio: Warner Bros.
  • DVD Release Date: October 21, 2009
  • Run Time: 96 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B002TOL4AA
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #48,299 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)
  • Learn more about "The Man I Love" on IMDb

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Editorial Reviews

Torch singer Petey Brown is beautiful and smart. The beautiful gets her in trouble. She'll need all of the smart to get out of it in this bluesy, boozy noir salute to tough dames in tough times. On a holiday visit to her family in the waning days of World War II, Petey expects a merry Christmas. Instead she gets a tangled web of mobsters, cheating wives, war-traumatized vets and the kind of love that grabs hold fast and goes wrong faster. Ida Lupino portrays Petey, scoring a triumph under the direction of Raoul Walsh, who helped put her on the road to stardom in the Bogart classic High Sierra. The Man I Love is also notable for its songbook of sophisticated standards and as the inspiration for Martin Scorsese's New York, New York.

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Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
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See all 12 customer reviews
It is one of the best openings to ANY film I have ever seen.
Douglas M
Although the music, direction, and supporting performances are all important to the film's success, it is ultimately Ida Lupino that makes this film work.
James L.
The movie is a blend also, of ordinary pot-boiler plotting and luminous, subtle touches that make it well worth seeing.
Karen Sampson Hudson

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

13 of 13 people found the following review helpful By James L. on January 3, 2003
Format: VHS Tape
Ida Lupino stars as a tough torch singer who comes to the aid of her family, all the while trying to deal with her own heartbreak. One sister, Andrea King, is trying to raise her son while her husband, John Ridgely, recovers from the War in a psychiatric ward. Another sister, Martha Vickers, is afraid to start dating/living life. Her brother, Warren Douglas, is working for a gangster, Robert Alda, and getting himself into tighter and tighter situations. Then there is the couple across the hall, Dolores Moran and Don McGuire, whose personal problems spill over into the family as well. And while all that is happening, Lupino embarks on a difficult romance with Bruce Bennett, a troubled pianist worn down by life. Obviously Ida has got her hands full. Lupino is very good in the central role, able to mix toughness with tenderness in a way that few actresses can. Alda is surprisingly good as the gangster who uses everyone, but can't get Ida to fall in love with him the way he has fallen for her. The rest of the cast are strong as well. I like the way director Raoul Walsh starts the film off with the great rendition of "The Man I Love", which helps to set a mood and atmosphere. The film gives the viewer a real sense of life in 1946 in Los Angeles.Walsh always paced his films well, and he keeps this film moving, giving it an edge that it needs. Watch how Ida manhandles McGuire at the end! Although the music, direction, and supporting performances are all important to the film's success, it is ultimately Ida Lupino that makes this film work.
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13 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Karen Sampson Hudson on October 9, 2003
Format: VHS Tape
Ida Lupino shines in this 40s era tale of music, love, woe, and choices. Robert Alda turns in a well-honed performance as the gangster who woos but never wins Ida, a nightclub torch singer. The musical numbers are well-produced and memorable in timeless, classic fashion.
"The Man I Love" is a marvelous vehicle to display the talents of Lupino, who plays "Petie" with a blend of toughness and tenderness that will win you over. The movie is a blend also, of ordinary pot-boiler plotting and luminous, subtle touches that make it well worth seeing. Recommended!
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18 of 20 people found the following review helpful By Andrew R. Oerman on June 27, 2002
Format: VHS Tape
The Man I Love is a rather hard-boiled soaper in the vein of Mildred Pierce. There is both too little plot and too much plot, but a brief summation would read thus: Ida Lupino uses her wit, wisdom, toughness and trailer-park pulchritude to solve all her family's problems in 90 minutes. There's also plenty of time set aside for musical interludes (some great, some ehh), so actually she solves them in more like 70.
This film paints its picture in very broad strokes: so much is touched upon and so little is dwelt upon that the story is never tremendously involving, despite all the things that it does well and all its charm. I'm all for a quick-pace, but this is sort of like the Classics Illustrated version of a better, more detailed movie.
Ida plays a world-weary torch singer (Hey, she's better than Britney) who leaves New York for LA, and immediately becomes involved in a myriad of soapy situations. Her younger sister watches over the brood, without the help of her war hero husband, who is currently suffering from war fatigue in an Army hospital. Ida sees that situation through, and does more. She helps her youngest sister get dolled up and go on a date (although she neeeded no help, IMHO); she steers her brother away from a life of crime; gets a job as a singer for the gangster who was corrupting her brother; and prevents a couple of murders, one by slapping around an armed man. She even makes time to assist the couple across the hall, by helping to heal his injured hand and wising him up to her infidelity. Along the way she flirts with several men, and falls for a burned-out piano player who can't truly reciprocate because his ex took with her "the best part of him" (no comments from you). After all this, her work done, she leaves her family for parts unknown, like a female Shane.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Patrick Doherty on September 3, 2003
Format: VHS Tape
THE MAN I LOVE is hurt by having too many subplots going on at once. As a consequence the viewer is apt to get bogged down just trying to keep the various threads straight. However, there are still good reasons to see the film. Ida Lupino is superb in her role as a motherly older sister and night club torch singer. The thoroughly competent cast is another reason. It includes Robert Alda, Andrea King, Bruce Bennett, Martha Vickers and Craig Stevens.
The music by George Gershwin, Jerome Kern and Johnny Green is excellent. It may not be the best effort by director Raoul Walsh but the touch of his genius can always be felt in any of his movies.
Raoul Walsh reportedly appreciated Ida Lupino because of her no nonsense approach to acting. She never came to the set with a lot of extra agendas.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Douglas M VINE VOICE on February 18, 2006
Format: VHS Tape
Warner Brothers had so many first rate leading actresses under contract in the forties that it was clearly hard to provide good material for them all. A number of their films mixed heavy dramatics and music. "The Man I Love" contains bits from maybe every 40's melodrama which Warners ever produced.

Ida Lupino plays a singer who visits her family and sorts out their lives. At the same time, she falls for a broken down pianist. The plot covers many cliches but the amazing thing is that Lupino holds it all together and it works. She is tough, funny, tender and emotional, one after the other. All the cast are competent. Robert Alda is much better here as a nightclub owner than in other films when he was miscast and the relationship between Lupino and sister Andrea King is very touching. The actresses show a great rapport.

Special mention must be made of Lupino's superb lip-synching to Peg La Centra's smoky voice. The opening sequence in the nightclub when the musicians jam "The Man I Love" after a late night surely was copied by George Cukor with Judy Garland in "A Star is Born". It is one of the best openings to ANY film I have ever seen.
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