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The Man in the Mirror Hardcover – June, 1987


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 311 pages
  • Publisher: Key Porter Books; 1St Edition edition (June 1987)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 155013048X
  • ISBN-13: 978-1550130485
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 6.3 x 1.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.6 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,245,119 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 11, 1999
Format: Hardcover
As a young Iranian who belongs to the after revolution's generation Carole Jeromes "The Man in The Mirror" gave me a clear vision of the Iranin revolution. Its touching love story as well made the book more interesting. It farely jodjes the beliefs of the moderates and radicals who struggled to gain power after fall of the king of Iran. It also contains the biography of Sadegh Ghotbzadeh who dedicated his life to Iran's freedom.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By shahram on June 6, 2010
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This book is about the very life of a man who had played a key role for the Islamic revolution to take place. He was no one, but Saddeq Ghotbzadeh whom was considered one of the closest people to Ayatollah Khomeini (father of the revolution). It gives us an ostensible account of the early days of the Islamic Republic. It draws a picture (very accurate) about the fights between all revolutionary forces and groups, the mosque and its role to capture the power and eliminate competitors who played much more important roles for the victory, but they were erraticated from the political spectrum one after another.

We have a chance to know more about a man who was so close to Khomeini to be considered as his right hand man or his son.
We receive information about the US embassy occupation and how that event was used as a political means to eradicate rivals and how it helped the republicans to win the presidential election and rap up Carter's presidency. We get information about the war and the first president of the Islamic Republic and their efforts (including Ghotbazadeh's) to end the war with dignity and victory which was Torpedoed by Rafsanjani and Khameneyie (the current leader).

Carole Jerome gives us an accurate picture about Saddeq Ghotbzadeh who was executed in the early years of the Islamic Republic. She also draws a private picture of Saddeq, because of her relationship with him.

Most of the stories are in line with the facts which I compared and checked, and yet this book gives us more details about his death (which I did not know).

The book is a very good read.
I am surprised of how this important book has been ignored all these years.
It is quite shocking.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Sara on January 4, 2011
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
If you're looking at this book and wondering if she's going to focus more on the love story than the history, you'll be surprised to know she gives very little attention to her relationship with Ghotbzadeh (probably because there really isn't much to say about it). The entire book is essentially her description of the revolution, and she provides a lot of fascinating information which I (nor my family, who were active in the revolution) did not know. So, it's a wonderful guide to understanding a revolution which is so often twisted by American perspectives; she clearly states the importance of other surrounding countries and non-Iranian figures active in shaping the revolution (it isn't all about Iran spurning America).

The reason I give it four stars is that the book is riddled with judgement calls which I found really obnoxious. I'm an atheist, and Iranian, and my family is really critical of the regime and of Islam in general, but she really shouldn't have written so extensively about her opinions. It makes the book unprofessional and condescending, making me wonder how factual she's being. She seems to know EVERYTHING before it happens, before even the Iranians know (she says that she knew immediately that Khomeini was evil, which is kind of a prepostorous thing to say and seems entirely based on his cold demeanor and the fact he's religious; she says she knew immediately that Beheshti would be a leader in the revolution, based solely on one interview, while Ghotbzadeh ignored him; she says she knew certain figures would be inherently sexist because they refused to look at her during interviews, something which is more characteristic of cultural attitudes toward modesty and politeness).
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By kaveh on October 27, 2009
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Where is she now? I'd love to hear her views about Iran and the revolution from the vantage point of 30 years.
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