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The Man from Shenandoah Paperback – January 1, 2003


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 246 pages
  • Publisher: iUniverse (January 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0595263089
  • ISBN-13: 978-0595263080
  • Product Dimensions: 9 x 6 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 13.1 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (25 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,501,247 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

Marsha Ward's clear and vivid writing sweeps us along with her characters on their adventures. --Western Fiction Review

Whatever happened to good, old fashioned westerns? If you've ever gazed over the shelves wondering this, Ms. Ward has a book for you. --Cindy Lynn, Midwest Book Review--Reviewer's Bookwatch, September 2003

I found THE MAN FROM SHENANDOAH immediately mesmerizing." --Jennifer Hill-Russell, Roundtable Reviews, October 15, 2003

From the Author

When I began writing what eventually became The Man from Shenandoah, I had no idea how long it would take to become an actual printed book. I was a teenager, so I doubt I was even thinking in terms of publication as I created the Owen family and their neighbors in the Shenandoah Valley of Virginia. For some reason, I kept those early efforts that I had typed on a manual typewriter, and they went with me when I married.

In the 1980s, I began to study writing with a view toward publication, and started winning contests and selling articles, poems, and short stories. I dug out the novel manuscript, spiffed it up a bit, and began submitting it. I even acquired an agent! I got some nice comments, but truthfully, the novel wasn't ready to be published. I performed radical surgery on it, and then began a sequel, Ride to Raton.

Life happened, and the urge to publish didn't come around again until I had a severe health crisis. Determined not to leave this earth without publishing my novels, I decided to pursue self-publishing. With eyes wide open, I chose iUniverse as the vehicle, and began hand-selling to family, friends, and others I met at writing conferences and events. To my great surprise and pleasure, readers loved the book, so I began polishing Ride to Raton. It also was received well. After life happened again, I finally produced Trail of Storms, which I thought would wrap up the series. I was wrong, as I'm writing another story about a member of the Owen family.

I'm often asked why I self-publish. My career as a journalist and many complimentary reviews of my works from industry insiders have proven that there is nothing lacking with my writing skills, and I could be published by the traditional means. However, because the self-publishing process is much speedier than traditional publishing, I continue to use that method to bring you my novels.

Thank you for your gracious reviews. You have no idea how they comfort me on dark days when the writing doesn't flow. They also both humble and daunt me. Will my next book live up to your expectations? I'm working hard to make that happen.

~Marsha Ward

More About the Author

Because Marsha was asked to provide this information, she says the book order in The Owen Family Saga is: 0-Gone for a Soldier, 1-The Man from Shenandoah, 2-Ride to Raton, 3-Trail of Storms, and 4-Spinster's Folly.

Marsha Ward was born in the sleepy little town of Phoenix, Arizona, in the southwestern United States; and grew up with chickens, citrus trees, and lots of room to roam. She became a storyteller at an early age, regaling her neighborhood friends with her fanciful tales during after-school snacks. Her love of 19th Century Western history was reinforced by visits to her cousins on their ranch and listening to her father's stories of homesteading in Old Mexico and in the southern part of Arizona.

Over the years, Marsha became an award-winning poet, writer and editor, with over 900 pieces of published work, including her acclaimed post-American Civil War novel series, The Owen Family Saga. She is the founder of American Night Writers Association, and a member of Western Writers of America, Women Writing the West, Pikes Peak Writers, and LDStorymakers. She makes her home in a tiny forest hamlet in Arizona. When she is not writing, she loves to travel, give talks, meet readers, and sign books. Visit her website at marshaward.com.

Customer Reviews

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If you like to read romance novels, particularly western romance novels, you will like this one.
Fay A. Klingler
I love that you can read the books out of order (or even just one) and not be left feeling like you've missed something important.
KachinaNova
This was a great story; the gripping action, the believable characters, and the historical research.
Lorna Goodman

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

17 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Pianissimo on February 8, 2007
Format: Paperback
I just finished reading "The Man from Shenandoah", and I thought it was great! I don't usually read Westerns, but this one kept me hooked from beginning to end. I thought the Southern dialect was especially nicely done. Dialet can be extremely hard to read and usually turns me off, but the author made it flow as smooth as butter. I would definitely recommend this book to anyone interested in the aftermath of the Civil War or Westerns in general!
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17 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Marian Nicola Spencer on January 29, 2003
Format: Paperback
Wow! I was very impressed with the pace of the story. It was always exciting in one way or another. Just when one adventure finished, another one started. This book had believeable characters, ones you identified with, ones loved and hated. Even if you think you don't like westerns, you will love this one. The story of Carl, James, Ellen, and all the rest just sweep you up and take you away for a while. I can't wait for the sequel.
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13 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Emily Williams on February 9, 2003
Format: Paperback
I was kept literally on the edge of my seat. I couldn't put it down. I love a good story and this is one of the best I've read in a long while. I feel for the characters and am eagerly awaiting a sequel (please). I would definitely recommend it.
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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Janet Brown on June 3, 2011
Format: Kindle Edition
The southern men return from the civil war only to find their homes and land destroyed and learn who will never return. The Owen family decides to go find a relative in Colorado and bring along some other families for a new start. This was a different style of writing of a western story and it was a delightful read. It ends nicely enough not leaving you with major questions but leaves you wanting to read more about their lives and an excerpt is included leading you into the next book of the series.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Nodin on March 4, 2003
Format: Paperback
I had nearly given up on reading Westerns as the newer ones I have read present such modern morals and language. Ms. Ward uses the language of the class & region, which makes The Man from Shenandoah so pleasing. Ms. Ward gives us joyous times but doesn't pass lightly over the hardships either. The author draws a character in such human warmth and depth that you have no trouble remembering who is whom. I don't know how a woman can write so well from a man's viewpoint; but, as she illustrates so well, men didn't understand women in the old West any better than they do now, but we women are another story!
Marsha Ward has a way with dialogue that eases us into familiarity with Carl Owen, the book's main character. His thoughts and words flow so clearly that we come to know him as a common man with a sense of humor. Carl is not given to flowery speeches. He can be a complex man who at times makes some pretty funny mistakes, and he doesn't like to apologize for them. Carl's values and his honor cause him no end of conflict with his family and others throughout his story. Often a western (especially one with romance included) lacks a deep feeling of family. I liked this one because the main character was not the 'loner with no family to teach him love and values' hero. The better part of the characters in this novel were members of warm, loving, laughing and arguing families. It was a joy to get to know them.
Ms. Ward paints vivid night skies, warm sun on your face and makes you wish you could lie down to contemplate the clouds in a meadow surrounded by quakies (Aspen trees to those not native to the Rockies). Colorado, Nevada, Utah and of course Arizona have been my playgrounds all my life and the journey into past memories was achingly sweet.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By lachish on January 13, 2011
Format: Paperback
This book was a very enjoyable read, and felt quite authentic to the time period. The characters were well done with both vulnerable men and strong women, both of whom grow throughout the story. I don't normally read western novels, but I would recommend this book for all readers. I look forward to reading the sequel!
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Writers 4 Literacy on April 6, 2010
Format: Paperback
After Carl returns home from the Civil War his father is determined to uproot the entire family and move to the Colorado Territory where he plans to raise cattle. He goes a bit farther when he also chooses a mate for both of his sons. Immediately Carl likes the looks of Miss Ida Hillbrands who with merry blue eyes and the blondest, silkiest curls he has ever seen. James wasn't happy that his father matched him up with Ellen Bates because he already had his heart set on someone else. Before the end these two brothers are fighting over one girl.

There is plenty of romance as well as action as the men battle outlaws, a prairie fire, and the weather. After a slow beginning, I later didn't want to put the book down. I could hardly wait to see what would happen next.

C. LaRene Hall, author of
Martha's Freedom Train
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Roland Cheek on November 11, 2012
Format: Paperback
The Man from Shenandoah Ms. Ward made me feel comfortable within her first 'Owen Family Saga' novel. Perhaps living in the SW as she has for years she learned a certain amount by osmosis, but, my having been around horses and in the country she writes so well about made me feel connected to the setting. The Civil War history provided insight not always read about. A moving novel.

Jane Cheek - Co-author of Dance on the Wild Side
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