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The Man Who Saw Tomorrow [VHS]


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Product Details

  • Actors: Orson Welles, Philip L. Clarke, Ray Laska, Bob Ruggiero, Roy Edmonds
  • Directors: Robert Guenette
  • Writers: Robert Guenette, Alan Hopgood
  • Producers: Alan Goland, David L. Wolper, Lee Kramer, Paul Drane, Peter Wood
  • Format: Black & White, Color, HiFi Sound, NTSC
  • Rated: PG (Parental Guidance Suggested)
  • Number of tapes: 1
  • Studio: Warner Home Video
  • VHS Release Date: September 1, 1998
  • Run Time: 90 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (57 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: 6300269698
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #35,504 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)

Editorial Reviews

Orson Welles narrates an incredible look at the prophecies of Nostradamus, whose amazing accuracy in predicting the future compels us to consider what his writings foretell us. Year: 1981 Director: Robert Guenette Starring: Orson Welles: Narrator

Customer Reviews

The narration by Orson Wells is so well done, I was hanging on his every word.
Mary Martini
I traveled to Germany and the Middle East in my time in the military, as an Counterintelligence Agent.
Johnny E. Wilson Jr.
If you are easily persuaded please watch this with someone else so they can maybe calm you down.
C Williams

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

12 of 12 people found the following review helpful By John A. Kuczma on January 12, 2000
Format: VHS Tape
The Man Who Saw Tomorrow provides only one of an infinite number of possible interpretations of the prophesies of Nostradamus. What makes this film something a little special is the narration of Orson Welles and the first-rate production values.
The cinematography is nearly flawless. Very effective use is made of interweaving historical film, often black and white, with original footage. Most of the actors used are convincing, and the scenarios presented are both thought-provoking and chilling. These effects are enhanced by a sparce but appropriate soundtrack.
The producers choose to take a very dark approach to the famed prophet's writings (quatraines, if you prefer). This morose perspective is balanced somewhat by the final visions included in the picture.
The accuracy of the interpretations or of the prophecies themselves is problematic, and the viewer will come to his or her own conclusions. However, the film does a masterful job of selecting prophesies that can be made to fit historical events or those possibilities of the immediate future which seem logical or even probable.
The only certainty about watching The Man Who Saw Tomorrow is that you won't forget it. You may want to, but you won't.
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on October 1, 2001
Format: VHS Tape
With the amount of emotion and feeling Orson Wells puts into his projects is by far outstanding. This was the most scary of them all due to the Attacks on September the 11th in New York. I usually don't write reviews on things such as this, but I watched the original broadcast on TV in 1981. The words them selves drew me back almost as if I had saw this just the other day. This is a movie worth takeing a look at and ponder over. The information delivered 20 years ago by this movie is so wierd I can barely describe it. It is a must see by all. I wonder what the transcribers of the profit are saying to them selves now.
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13 of 14 people found the following review helpful By E. Lee Zimmerman on May 18, 2002
Format: VHS Tape
The prophecies of Nostradamus are written in such a way that nothing definitive could be gleaned from a single interpretation, and THE MAN WHO SAW TOMORROW generously gives several interpretations to the few significant quatrains (sp?) that the prophet wrote.
However, this picture was produced in a documentary fashion, using fresh footage compiled with stock footage from older films; the end result visually kept me guessing at what films they culled explosions from as opposed to being further intrigued by the prophecies.
Its single redeeming quality is that it might titillate the viewer to actually go and pick up a book about Nostradamus to investigate the 'prophecies' in a more personal, meaning way.
The film is narrated by Orson Welles, who (as always) gives an air of credibility to an otherwise unexplored subject matter.
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17 of 21 people found the following review helpful By Mark Savary on October 3, 2002
Format: VHS Tape Verified Purchase
"The Man Who Saw Tomorrow" is the penultimate example of the late-70's, early-80's sub-genre known as the psuedo-science documentary.
In this sub-genre of the documentary arena, the Unknown was a prominent feature. Topics ranged from Stonehenge to Bigfoot, from Atlantis to the Bermuda Triangle, from ESP to ancient astronauts, from the paranormal to Noah's Ark. In "The Man Who Saw Tomorrow", the topic is the grandaddy of all psychics, physician Michel de Nostradamus.
What makes this particular pseudo-science offering so compelling is the presence of Mr. Orson Welles. Welles was obviously well past it here, both at his heaviest weight and yet strangely frail in appearance (Welles would pass away a mere four years after this film), but his acting is without flaw as both host and "presenter" of the film. Welles makes the case, although the case is otherwise pretty flimsy for the "predictions" and "prophecies" of Nostradamus.
As others have mentioned, the writings of Nostradamus are vague enough to be interpreted many different ways, and several have been debunked, but the film is great fun nevertheless. Obviously, some cash was spent to make this a decent presentation, and on the whole, the film is darn good despite being somewhat dated.
One side note of interest to film fans is that several of the "world ending" special effects on display here were culled from the George Pal sci-fi classic "When Worlds Collide". Pal would undoubtedly be pleased (as should be fans of his work), that the effects from his 1951 sci-fi opus were still impressive enough to be spliced into a film made thirty years later.
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15 of 19 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on August 3, 2002
Format: VHS Tape
This movie is "ok" for a B movie-style documentary that presents mix-n-match quatraines from Nostradamus to present the prophet's past, present, and future "predictions". Any God-fearing individual who is into prophecy and end-time predictions knows that a true prophet accurately predicts events 100%, not 50% or 30% or 10% of the time. Nor will he/she know the date and time of the end of the world. Alas, many translated predictions and interpretations (remember Nostradamus wrote in a cryptic what-the-hell-were-you-smoking? prose style) have never come to pass. Those that have are "ify" at best based on hindsight knowledge of history. Case in point, I remember sitting around at a friend's house in Laguna Beach, CA during late May of 1993-94 timeframe and noticed a book in his collection about predictions of Nostradamus. Out of curiousity (since I remembered seeing this movie in the early '80s on cable as a young kid, and being quite scared afterwards, I might add), I picked up the book and turned to a section that had predictions for the 1990s and the current timeframe we were living. Lo and behold California was suppose to be underwater earlier that May due to a major earthquake with chaos and destruction too follow. Happily to say it is 2002 and California (for the time being) is still above water. ;)
The movie does an ok presentation of piecing together predictions that supposedly were dead-on accurate, but anyone who has done extensive research on Nostradamus (there is a lot of resource material on the web) knows that most of the info presented in this movie is pretty sloppy.
As for future events, the 9/11 attacks were never predicted by Nostradamus. Like an earlier reviewer stated, the whole "Nostradamus Predicted 9/11 Prophecy" that ran rampant on the Internet was a hoax.
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