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The Man Who Was Thursday Paperback – October 14, 2011


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 194 pages
  • Publisher: Simon & Brown (October 14, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1613821298
  • ISBN-13: 978-1613821299
  • Product Dimensions: 9 x 6 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 10.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,011,906 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By S. Grotzke on May 1, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Point: Both good and evil exist in this world, but there is one who understands it all

Path: Chesterton leads the reader through twist and turn in this running novel. Anarchists and police officers meet and unmask one another. Giant elephants, twisted smiles, hot air balloons, and a man in the dark make this story a revealer of surprises every page.

Sources: Chesterton was describing the insanity he saw all around him at the beginning of the 20th century. His fantastic imagination lights a fire which burns for days in the mind of the reader.

Agreement: This world is on its head, but at least there is one who knows it all. And that one is slowly showing a few.

Personal App: Although I have had to work through this several times, I keep wanting to read it again. There is so much there.

Favorite Quote: "We say that the most dangerous criminal now is the entirely lawless modern philosopher. Compared to him, burglars and bigamists are essentially moral men; my heart goes out to them. They accept the essential ideal of man; they merely seek it wrongly. Thieves respect property. They merely wish the property to become their property that they may more perfectly respect it. But philosophers dislike property as property; they wish to destroy the very idea of personal possession."

It would be worth another read and I would recommend it.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Debra Murphy on November 15, 2011
Format: Paperback
From the back cover of the illustrated Idylls Press edition:

"Originally published in 1908, G.K. Chesterton's nightmare-fantasy of Police vs. Dynamiters, Law vs. Anarchy, and Religion vs. Nihilism has influenced writers as diverse as Franz Kafka and C.S. Lewis, and remains as exuberant and imaginative, as original and prophetic as when if first appeared."

While Chesterton is probably best known in Christian circles for his apologetical works (The Everlasting Man, Orthodoxy, et al.), his novels are simultaneously so much fun and yet so profound that it is long since time for contemporary readers to rediscover them. THE MAN WHO WAS THURSDAY, for instance, while a work of its time--our terrorists are of a different and less civilized sort than those in Chesterton's day, when even a Dynamiter felt obliged to keep his word--Chesterton still has much to teach us. For it would appear that the philosophical foundations of this nastiest of political tactics has changed very little in almost a century.

Part detective thriller, part Alice-through-the-Looking-Glass fantasy, THURSDAY is the wild and witty tale of a poet turned detective (Gabriel Syme) whose mission in life, after witnessing a horrible bomb blast in London, is to destroy the evil conclave of Anarchists threatening civilization. Meeting another poet, this one of the Anarchist persuasion (Lucian Gregory), Syme goes undercover to infiltrate the Council of European Anarchists.

And just in time, too, as this occasionally frightening, occasionally goofy group of eccentrics, known only to one another by the names of the Days of the Week--Syme ends up as "Thursday"--is plotting nothing less than the assassination of the Russian Czar and the French President during a meeting in Paris.
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By Himeko Inaba on February 4, 2014
Format: Paperback
The author sends naive hero on a crazy journey - being sure to remind us every page how "outrageous" his book is. His main thrust is to ridicule the masses for gullibility, remind the reader he is wasting his life, and shame on him was caught up in the nonsense too.

Any "commentary" stops there, however, and we're left with an admonishment that God is a legitimate ruler because he has suffered too - or maybe that we should suffer because God is a legitimate ruler. Either is fine. What more can be said? It's unintentionally the funniest part of this premeditated farce, light-years ahead of HAY THIS GUY IS A PSEUD and HAY LOOK HE'S RIDING AN ELUHFANT!

As a thriller it fails miserably. Who can care when the title says it's all a dream? The one, single suspenseful scene - a few cops surrounded by an angry mob on a pier - was utterly ruined when the leader of that mob was also an ally.

On one point I can praise this book: the lively, grotesque descriptions of the Council members' disguises - the secretary's smile, Bull's glasses, and especially the belabored, shaking movements of Professor de Worms brought a genuine smile to my face.

Chesterton is not a horrible writer; he's simply out of his league. He had the idea to write a book about ideas, but it was too big for him. He read Ecclesiastes, and tried to write the first half of Candide.

(Those are both good)
--------------------
review courtesy of strangemoe.net
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Well this is one of the best books ever so at any price and any condition it is worth it.
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