The Man With The Iron Fists 2012 R CC

Amazon Instant Video

(628) IMDb 5.4/10
Available in HD
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Quentin Tarantino presents The Man with the Iron Fists, an epic action-adventure inspired by classic kung fu movies. Starring Academy Award-winner Russell Crowe, RZA and Lucy Liu.

Starring:
RZA, Rick Yune
Runtime:
1 hour 36 minutes

Available to watch on supported devices.

The Man With The Iron Fists

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Product Details

Genres Action
Director RZA
Starring RZA, Rick Yune
Supporting actors Russell Crowe, Lucy Liu, Dave Bautista, Jamie Chung, Cung Le, Byron Mann, Daniel Wu, Zhu Zhu, Chia-Hui Liu, Andrew Ng, Kuan Tai Chen, Yoyao Hsueh, Telly Liu, Wen-Jun Dong, Zhan De Re, Lu Kai, Jin Auyeung, Ka-Yan Leung
Studio Universal Pictures
MPAA rating R (Restricted)
Captions and subtitles English Details
Rental rights 24 hour viewing period. Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Instant Video (streaming online video and digital download)

Customer Reviews

The Action sequences in this movie were just not that good.
Jim Phillips
Seemed the movie was just jumbled together, Plot and story just seemed to lack and more focused on the fighting scenes and nothing else.
Jordan Dalton
Russell Crowe is always good, and Lucy Lu gives a nice performance.
David Whitehead

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

74 of 88 people found the following review helpful By B. Cravens on December 3, 2012
Format: Blu-ray
The Man With the Iron Fists is a movie that was 'presented' (not produced) by Quentin Tarantino and directed by RZA. It centers on the story of a black blacksmith in China, who is trying to leave his hostile home village that's entrenched in between good ol' clan wars.

If you are seeking to be entertained, look no further. RZA blends the 'hip-hop samurai' type of music and feel -- prevalent in a lot of anime in recent years -- with the Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon-floating-around-style of fighting to create a high-flying (no pun intended) and adventurous parody of the genres with a Spaguetti Western flare. Needless to say, visually this movie is great in many respects.

However, beyond that, the movie suffers from more than a few noticeable stumbling points. The first being dialogue. Not only is the writing over-simplified, but the fact that some of the Chinese characters have Oriental-English accents while others speak perfectly clear English is something that will distract some viewers from the already simple plot. In addition, the main antagonist Silver Lion is portrayed as the funny one-liner villain, but there are times when his role feels overdone and out of place during the more serious scenes. Perhaps this harkens back to the older Kung-fu movie time other reviewers mentioned, but for me it was distracting.

Another caveat is the characters. They didn't feel very memorable, which is again probably due to the dialogue. The exception here is Russel Crowe's character, who exhibits wit, style, and the fact he sticks out like a sore thumb in a charming way. While I feel he did an extraordinary job in executing this role, I'm not exactly sure how his career will be affected in the long-run from this... You'll know what I mean.
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61 of 78 people found the following review helpful By null on November 15, 2012
Format: DVD
fantastic movie! i saw a lot of very unique and fun kung fu ideas that could only come from a true movie fan such as the rza! there is a brass statue of a man that is in many movies as a training dummy for qi (chi) blocking attacks. in this movie there is the statue and a man with skin that can become brass at will, it links up toward the end in such a cool way i was blown away. i imagine the rza back in the 70's thinking "what if someone had to fight the qi training statue? then they would be really f*&%ed!"

i could see where he deliberately paid homage to old kung fu films with some of the camera work, hair and acting styles, this kind of thing might look odd too someone who hasn't seen older kung fu movies as some of it seems corny or stilted (which is how those old movies are, something fans love!). but even so, they would get over it every time one of the AMAZING battles started.

at first the rap music came off as out of place. this is coming from a wu tang clan fan since the 36 chambers, and digital bullet is one of my favorite albums, but they're in ancient china and it's all hip hop style which doesn't really match up, but it grew on me very fast and by the end i was bobbing my head to the beats and enjoying them with the fight scenes. i grew up listening to wu tang, and rza always puts cuts from classic kung fu movies in his music. it's really cool hearing them and then, years later, stumbling over the same lines or music while watching the movie they're from without knowing it ahead of time. it's like: "why do i recognize this? i've never seen this movie... oh yeah! wu tang!" this was the exact opposite of that and it worked pretty well! i'm watching a kung fu movie and thinking "wait a minute, i know that song!"

and the story? phenomenal!
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By P. A. Clark on April 8, 2014
Format: DVD
Having watched several of the Shaw Brothers classics during my day, I can definitely see where Rza got his inspiration for this movie. The only problem is, he created a bad Kung Fu fantasy instead of putting out a memorable film. As many people have already described this film in detail, I'm not going to go into the plot. But suffice to say, Rap music doesn't belong in a 19th century period piece. It just doesn't. Rza would have been better off getting the film properly scored instead of creating a Rap soundtrack for the background music. It was very distracting.

Second, Rza choosing to have an African American character in the film, working as a blacksmith, might have worked. The only problem is, he chose to play the role himself. I have to agree with what others have already stated. Rza is not a very good actor in general. Add to that his street flare as he delivers his lines, and you have a mismatch character who doesn't really belong in the story. As a result, It was difficult to buy into his role. Had he picked a seasoned actor instead, it might have worked out. But as is, this film was likely a life long dream of his, so I guess he had to fit himself in somewhere. In retrospect, it was a mistake.

I commend him, however, for tapping into the Asian American acting pool for his lead roles. Lucy Lui did well enough, as did Ricky Yune. Jamie Chung also appears in the film as Rza's love interest, but she doesn't really get enough screen time to leave her mark. It seemed like she was mainly there to give Rza's character a connection to the film. Russell Crowe also appears and his acting is always good. But in this case, he seemed out of place. His character was odd and seemed to be written in just to have an excuse for more star power on the screen.
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