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The Managed Heart: Commercialization of Human Feeling, Twentieth Anniversary Edition, With a New Afterword Paperback – May 5, 2003

ISBN-13: 978-0520239333 ISBN-10: 0520239334 Edition: 2nd

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The Managed Heart: Commercialization of Human Feeling, Twentieth Anniversary Edition, With a New Afterword + The Presentation of Self in Everyday Life + Mind, Self, and Society from the Standpoint of a Social Behaviorist (Works of George Herbert Mead, Vol. 1)
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 330 pages
  • Publisher: University of California Press; 2nd edition (May 5, 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0520239334
  • ISBN-13: 978-0520239333
  • Product Dimensions: 8.2 x 5.8 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 14.4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #146,230 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"A worthy study of the high, and often hidden, personal costs that people in certain occupations pay for agreeing to treat their feelings as merchandise." -- San Jose Mercury News

A notable social science book for 1983. -- New York Times Book Review

A worthy study of the high, and often hidden, personal costs that people in certain occupations pay for agreeing to treat their feelings as merchandise. -- San Jose Mercury News --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From the Inside Flap

Praise for the first edition:

"Profoundly original…terribly important."—Studs Terkel

"The Managed Heart is written so accessibly that it appeals to both the academic and the general reader."—Gail Sheehy, New York Times Book Review

"Perceptive study of 'emotional labor'—jobs like those of [flight attendants], in which workers are trained to use emotion as actors do, but who…often end up unsure of what they really feel."—New York Times Books of the Year, 1983

"A worthy study of the high, and often hidden, personal costs that people in certain occupations pay for agreeing to treat their feelings as merchandise."—San Jose Mercury News

More About the Author

Arlie Russell Hochschild's most recent book The Outsourced Self: Intimate Life in Market Times, explores the many ways in which the market enters our modern lives. It looks at how we both turn to the market as a source of much needed help and also how we try to protect ourselves from the implicit emotional detachment it can involve. The book has been reviewed in The New York Times Book Review and was excerpted - "The Outsourced Self" - in the Sunday New York Times "Review" Section.

Her other books include: The Managed Heart, The Second Shift, The Time Bind, The Commercialization of Intimate Life, The Unexpected Community and the co-edited Global Woman: nannies, maids and sex workers in the new economy. In reviewing the Second Shift (reissues in 2012 with a new Afterword) Robert Kuttner noted her "subtlety of insights" and "graceful seemless narrative" and called it the "best discussion I have read of what must be the quintessential domestic bind of our time." Newsweek's Laura Shapiro described the Time Bind as "groundbreaking." In awarding Hochschild the Jesse Bernard Award, the American Sociological Association citation observed her "creative genius for framing questions and lines of insight, often condensed into memorable, paradigm-shifting words and phrases." A retired U.C. Berkeley professor of sociology, she lives with her husband, the writer Adam Hochschild in Berkeley, California.

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

32 of 37 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on September 15, 1998
Format: Paperback
Using the experiences of flight attendants, the author describes the stresses and effects of on-the-job "emotional labor". She also describes how dehumanizing such labor can be in an atmosphere of gender inequality, socioeconomic inequality, and the increasing rationalization of the workplace in the corporate pursuit of profits. An excellent and interesting read.
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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By suburban dissident on February 24, 2011
Format: Paperback
Arlie Hochschild's research often brings out the most interesting aspects of our mundane practices. Here, primarily by analyzing the experiences of airline stewardesses, Hochschild tackles the question of what happens when, in our hyper consumer culture, one's emotions become commodified, when our feelings become a product? For service industries - hence the stewardesses - Hochschild finds that it isn't just delivering drinks that is part of the product; it is also one's smile and positive attitude that is similarly included (no matter how much you might want to dump a drink on the guy in the second row). As one can likely imagine, emotional commercialization doesn't lead to the best of outcomes: burnout and an inability to parse out on-stage and off-stage emotions.

This book is great for those interested in sociology of emotions, the effects of modernizations and commercialization, and anyone hankering for another reason to not like consumer culture. For me, this book stands as a model for what good sociological writing can be like: insightful, entertaining and inspiring.
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2 of 9 people found the following review helpful By chol perez on November 26, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
My doughter use thi book in the colleges and she think is great and help the students to learn the class.
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0 of 9 people found the following review helpful By wendilee on June 10, 2012
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I received this book and thank you for having it. This is one of the books I did not think I would find for such a reasonable price. Much appreciated.
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4 of 27 people found the following review helpful By Sergij Dominik Novak on July 4, 2000
Format: Paperback
Fantastic work, great research...,great Subject, but need a follow up Book...to see how things are done now at DL...
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