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The Manhattan Projects, Vol. 1: Science Bad Paperback – September 18, 2012


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The Manhattan Projects, Vol. 1: Science Bad + The Manhattan Projects, Vol. 2 + The Manhattan Projects Volume 3 TP
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Product Details

  • Series: Manhattan Projects
  • Paperback: 144 pages
  • Publisher: Image Comics (September 18, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1607066084
  • ISBN-13: 978-1607066088
  • Product Dimensions: 0.5 x 6.5 x 10 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 7.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (56 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #12,587 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Booklist

Mad science has long been a prime subject for comics. Hickman’s latest series is about as mad as it gets, imagining that the Manhattan Project was really just a front for Oppenheimer, Einstein, Feynman, et al., to get into the really out-there stuff in Los Alamos. And while Japanese teleportation machines (Zen-powered by Death Buddhists), concurrent universes accessed by an enigmatic portal-stone, and shady bargains with warring alien races over humanity’s fate are all good and fun, Hickman’s strongest play is the way he tinkers with the historical cast members at the dawn of the atomic age. Oppenheimer, in particular, gets a disturbingly twisted portrayal, and who couldn’t love giving the Max Headroom treatment to postlife FDR? On the art side, Pitarra’s long-legged figures look like they could have just jumped out of a Where’s Waldo? book and into a zany, bloody conspiracy theory come to life. Determined to blow as many minds on as many different levels as he can, Hickman is onto something with this series. --Ian Chipman

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Customer Reviews

The characters as a whole seem to have a good depth and variety.
Amazon Customer
I know people swear by Hickman but I really couldn't get all that into this story.
Michael Austerlitz
This is one of the smartest, most enjoyable comics I have read in a long time.
William

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

31 of 33 people found the following review helpful By Mitch Hamilton on September 12, 2012
Format: Paperback
I just read a new comic by Jonathan Hickman called The Manhattan Projects and it was CUH-RAY-ZEE.

If you know anything about the real Manhattan Project then you will be both fascinated and horrified by this alternate reality depiction of the scientists who built "The Bomb".

The Manhattan Projects is about atomic bombs in the same way The Matrix is about virtual reality. It's in there, but it ain't what you're expecting. Much like how the Matrix was a false world covering up the horrors of the real world The Manhattan Projects uses the front of building an atom bomb to hide the truth of weirder and more horrible experiments taking place at Los Alamos New Mexico.

All the big names are all there, Einstein, Oppenheimer, Von Braun, even President FDR, but they are not the men from our history books and Hickman takes them in weird and wild directions, ending with a cliff hanger that leaves you shuddering at the thought of what's to come.

You should give Manhattan Projects a try if you're at all interested in strange and unique stories that are a little on the creepy side. The trade paperback collecting the first 5 issues is now out... and waiting for you.
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Format: Paperback
Jonathan Hickman has, for the last few years at least over at Marvel, been the "big brain" writer. He wrote several books from FANTASTIC FOUR to FF (Future Foundation) to the more esoteric and incredibly ambitious version of S.H.I.E.L.D and more recently on THE ULTIMATES. He's a creator who has a great love for great minds and always shoots for the smartest reader in the comic shop. When the idea of Hickman and his RED WING partner Nick Pitarra's THE MANHATTAN PROJECTS for Image Comics was first presented to me, it seemed like something that was an absolute natural for Hickman. A comic about the assembly of some of the greatest scientific minds in history that did actually participate in the actual "Manhattan Project" of development of the Atomic Bomb, but also, even more secretly, did some of the most brain-shredding science ever? And not only would it be about the science that they do, but the scientists themselves, like Joseph Robert Oppenheimer, Albert Einstein, Enrico Fermi, Richard Feynman and the project's leader, General Leslie Groves.

What Hickman does here, and does so incredibly well, is that he creates a bizarre and twisted characterization for each of these real people and gives it the intelligence and creativity to make it work within the framework of this book. As way of a for instance, Oppenheimer has multiple-personality disorder, and feels that he, as Joseph, has "devoured" his brother Robert and become an amalgam of the two... and that's just the first chapter. Scientist Harry Daghlian has apparently absorbed so much radiation that he's essentially just a skeleton in a containment suit. Fermi may very well not be a human being. Einstein... well... he has a monolith.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on April 23, 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I really enjoyed the first volume. The handling of the Oppenheimer character was amazing, enough said no spoiler. The characters as a whole seem to have a good depth and variety. Whether or not it plays out well only time, and volume 2 and 3, will tell. This volume does a good job of laying a foundation, introducing characters, and coming to something of a conclusion while simultaneously leaving an opening for more story, hence volume 2 and 3. You really can't ask for more. The art is good. It grew on me as I read. This book would be good for people that enjoy a comic outside the normal "dude with gadgets versus bro in panties and a cape" stuff that we get in heavy doses. Don't get me wrong,I like superheroes plenty, but something like Manhattan Projects, Wasteland, and Walking Dead are a nice change from that formula. Nicely done and cool take as an alternate reality using some real people from actual history. Like Thor! Ok, maybe not like Thor but it is cool and unique. Worth a comic lover's time in my opinion.
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Format: Paperback
Collects The Manhattan Projects issues #1-5

If you don't know what this book is about, here's a quick description of the contents: People have now heard that President FDR commissioned a secret project during WWII called the Manhattan Project. This project led to the creation of the atomic bomb. What people don't know is that it wasn't just one project being worked on. A team of scientists were developing a lot of projects centered around such things as alien life, parallel universes, and artificial intelligence (just to name a few). In this alternate history story, we see the scientists in action, and witness the effects of their discoveries.

This book was surprisingly violent, so I didn't love that. I've heard that other people like this book, but for me, the style isn't what I am looking for right now. There were some interesting concepts, and I typically enjoy Hickman's writing, but this book wasn't a good fit for me.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By poopzilla on December 29, 2013
Format: Paperback
I am a very casual comic fan, and I recognize in advance of even completing this sentence that my review will seem hyperbolic, but I just finished reading this and can honestly say I enjoyed it more than any other graphic / comic novel I've ever read. I have read The Watchmen and The Dark Knight Returns, and while I thought The Watchmen was the better cohesive achievement, this Vol 1 was the most I've enjoyed a comic / graphic novel EVER.

I got it as a gift and didn't really know what it was. I regarded it as a standalone work because I had no intention to buy the subsequent volumes. As such, it reminded me of the movie Prometheus or the novel John Dies at the End in that it was very dense with fast-paced science fiction ideas, and, as such, didn't really have a structure or clear story arc.

Most of the characters are based loosely on the great physicists of the 20th century. There's a running series of excerpts from a fictional interview with Feynman, and it's so good that I really thought that these were his own timeless quotes. To say anything specific about the story is to spoil it. There's a twist or a a game-changing plot point every three or four pages. Unlike the fictional Feynman quotes, these twists and plot points are completely ridiculous.

I still don't want to buy the next volume, because I liked this so much that I'd like to remember it on its own terms. Highly recommended for people who like weird things.
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