Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your email address or mobile phone number.

Qty:1
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
The Many Panics of 1837: ... has been added to your Cart
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: This is a used text in good condition. It may have some writing and highlighting. Ships directly from Amazon. All Supplemental discs, materials, or access codes should be included. Eligible for free super saver shipping.
Sell yours for a Gift Card
We'll buy it for $7.46
Learn More
Trade in now
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 3 images

The Many Panics of 1837: People, Politics, and the Creation of a Transatlantic Financial Crisis Paperback – December 12, 2013

4.2 out of 5 stars 5 customer reviews

See all 4 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$29.99
$26.66 $19.99

Top 20 lists in Books
Top 20 lists in Books
View the top 20 best sellers of all time, the most reviewed books of all time and some of our editors' favorite picks. Learn more
$29.99 FREE Shipping on orders over $35. In Stock. Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

  • The Many Panics of 1837: People, Politics, and the Creation of a Transatlantic Financial Crisis
  • +
  • The Half Has Never Been Told: Slavery and the Making of American Capitalism
  • +
  • River of Dark Dreams: Slavery and Empire in the Cotton Kingdom
Total price: $74.34
Buy the selected items together


Editorial Reviews

Review

"Finally a historian who understands that panics were caused by people panicking. Like weather systems, economies present deep structural patterns and shifting intermediate forces, but for people in real time it was precipitating events that made the difference between great riches and financial ruin. This masterful telling of a complex tale - Dickensian in its intricacy - walks the reader through a series of moments in which individuals had no choice but to take a position that more often than not guaranteed the frightening outcome they sought to avoid. By rejecting the naturalization of economic theory, Jessica Lepler has vividly captured the world as it must have looked to the governors of the Bank of England, to the bill brokers and cotton factors of New Orleans, to Nicholas Biddle and poor old Philip Hone. The brutal market 'corrections' of 1837 (and after) stood as the defining events of the lives of this generation of Americans."
John Lauritz Larson, Purdue University

"In this compelling and moving account Jessica Lepler shows us how a bank war could undermine British faith in American borrowers and cause a cascade of doubts about America's future. The chain of debt is the same as five years ago, although the vividly drawn cast of characters is radically different. Compulsively readable, this will change the way you think about the intimate relationship between slavery and capitalism."
Scott Nelson, The College of William and Mary

"The Many Panics of 1837 is a gripping narrative about what happened to disrupt financial markets and individual investors in 1837. But Lepler has also given us a theoretically deft account of how the history of this year has been written and why its many iterations matter. This book is essential reading for anyone interested in how we construct the past and how the past we construct shapes what we can know about the world we inhabit now."
Mary Poovey, Samuel Rudin Professor in the Humanities, New York University

"Lepler combines financial, business and economic history with social, cultural and political history in a transnational context in The Many Panics of 1837 to demonstrate that human agency remains at the heart of seemingly large impersonal forces. Lepler argues persuasively in this well-written tale of three cities that the transition from the best of times to the worst of times explains the psychology of what was so panicky about the panic of 1837 ... I have already adopted this book for use in my class on the early American republic."
Michael J. Gagnon, The Journal of American History

"... offers cultural context for the Panic of 1837 that earlier treatments have lacked. Navigating impressively through a wealth of business correspondence and private letters of various merchants and financiers, large and small, as well as the contemporary press, Lepler paints a vivid picture of the thoughts that passed through the minds of individuals as their fortunes took a fateful turn in the spring of that year ... Lepler makes the complex interactions of this market easy to understand."
Peter L. Rousseau, EH.net

"Lepler defines the heretofore poorly understood Panic of 1837 in terms of human emotional response ... productive, historically grounded examinations of the ways in which feelings and ideas made and were remade by the history of finance ... draw[s] on ideas, culture, politics, business, institutions, law, and economics ... acknowledge[s] 'real' economic change, while insisting that this change is bound up with changes in subjectivity."
Hannah Farber, Enterprise and Society

Book Description

This riveting transatlantic cultural history, based on archival research on two continents, reveals how people transformed their experiences of financial crisis into the "Panic of 1837," a single event that would serve as a turning point in American history and an early inspiration for business cycle theory.
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Image
Looking for the Audiobook Edition?
Tell us that you'd like this title to be produced as an audiobook, and we'll alert our colleagues at Audible.com. If you are the author or rights holder, let Audible help you produce the audiobook: Learn more at ACX.com.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 356 pages
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press (September 16, 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1107640865
  • ISBN-13: 978-1107640863
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 0.8 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #942,868 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This is a work of great detail and mixed quality. Its best feature is Lepler's prodigious research. Focusing primarily on what was happening in three locations--London, New Orleans, and New York--she has thoroughly combed through such primary sources as the archives of business and financial firms and the Bank of England; the reports and commentaries in newspapers and other contemporary publications; court records; personal correspondence; sermons; and assorted forgotten books that offered advice on household economy. She is also familiar with a vast secondary literature.

Unfortunately, Lepler couples her valuable contributions with noticeable flaws. The first involves errors and omissions. Despite her familiarity with several sophisticated economic analyses, she seems to have never mastered the fundamental principles available in more basic economic texts. She does stress how ubiquitous credit was in 19th-century commerce, yet Lepler never fully grasps its vital role in the allocation of savings. And in her extensive examination of information's impact on the development and spread of panic, she could have profited from Friedrich Hayek's insight into the role of markets in revealing information. Lepler even believes that economists are oblivious to the obvious fact that aggregates such as Gross Domestic Product result from "a nearly infinite number of individual choices." These and other lapses lead her to a thinly disguised disdain for economics as a discipline.

The book exhibits some historical lacunae as well. It is undoubtedly a bit churlish to complain that such a well-researched account overlooks some important works. Nonetheless, I was surprised to discover Lepler's reliance on the popular, superficial biography of Van Buren written by Clinton speechwriter Ted Widmer.
Read more ›
Comment 10 of 12 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
I have been looking forward to reading this book since The Society of American Historians awarded the prize to her doctoral dissertation. The Panic of 1837 is both well-known to economists, but also often overlooked when considering America's financial history. Dr. Lepler makes many interesting points, including the trans-Atlantic nature of the economic downturn, as well as showing how the financial problems played out in different sections of the U.S. as well as London.

I did find the first two chapters difficult because her style in those two chapters show a certain "flippant" attitude. I don't know if she meant to produce something that would seem more light and conversational, but I found it off-putting.

I have not seen her dissertation, so I can't judge the differences between it and this publication, but if you can make it through the initial chapters, the book becomes more focused and interesting.

You can see in this work the start of a very interesting career for an historian who should only improve as she accumulates a deeper understanding of 19th Century views on business.

I definitely recommend it to anyone looking to understand how Americans dealt with one of the great financial downturns in our economic history.
Comment 5 of 6 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Learned a lot from this book! Useful parallels for today.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
A thorough study of the banking panic of 1837. Some things have changed, but as Lepler shows, we can still have much to learn from studying the history of panics long past. Human beings don't change all that much.
Comment 1 of 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
thanks
Comment 0 of 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more
The Many Panics of 1837: People, Politics, and the Creation of a Transatlantic Financial Crisis
This item: The Many Panics of 1837: People, Politics, and the Creation of a Transatlantic Financial Crisis
Price: $29.99
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com