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The Marshall Islands 1944: Operation Flintlock, the Capture of Kwajalein and Eniwetok (Campaign) Paperback – October 22, 2004


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The Marshall Islands 1944: Operation Flintlock, the Capture of Kwajalein and Eniwetok (Campaign) + Saipan & Tinian 1944: Piercing the Japanese Empire (Campaign) + Tarawa 1943: The turning of the tide (Campaign)
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Product Details

  • Series: Campaign (Book 146)
  • Paperback: 96 pages
  • Publisher: Osprey Publishing (October 22, 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1841768510
  • ISBN-13: 978-1841768519
  • Product Dimensions: 7.2 x 0.2 x 9.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8.5 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #644,456 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

Highly visual guides to history's greatest conflicts, detailing the command strategies, tactics, and experiences of the opposing forces throughout each campaign, and concluding with a guide to the battlefields today.

About the Author

Gordon L Rottman entered the US Army in 1967, volunteered for Special Forces and completed training as a weapons specialist. He served in the 5th Special Forces Group in Vietnam in 1969–70 and subsequently in airborne infantry, long-range patrol and intelligence assignments until retiring after 26 years. He was a special operations forces scenario writer at the Joint Readiness Training Centre for 12 years and is now a freelance writer.

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Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
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This book offers a great reference for WWII history buffs.
Kendo
The author did a good job of consolidating several battles into one coherent narrative.
Mike Dillemuth
The 3-D maps of Roi-Namur and Kwajalein were especially good.
Dave Schranck

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

13 of 14 people found the following review helpful By R. A Forczyk VINE VOICE on January 23, 2005
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
In Osprey's Campaign series #146, The Marshall Islands 1944, Gordon L. Rottman continues his painstaking effort to detail US Marine operations in the Pacific in the Second World War. As usual, Rottman provides ample information on unit movements, casualties and orders of battle, while avoiding any effort to put the campaign in a human perspective by including first-person accounts or mentioning Medal of Honor recipients. Nevertheless, the Marshall Island campaign of 1944 has faded from sight due to all the attention on D-Day and bigger Pacific actions like Okinawa, so Rottman's effort is not without its merit. By including this operation and all the others that Rottman has written about, Osprey has established a common framework for looking at these largely forgotten campaigns of 1943-1944.

Rottman provides more strategic background to this campaign than he has in other volumes. In his section on opposing plans, Rottman notes that the Japanese misjudged American intentions in the central Pacific and deployed only "odds and ends" forces into the Marshall Islands and the leadership in Tokyo viewed the islands as beyond their main defensive sphere. Given the Japanese refusal to commit additional air or naval forces to the defense of the Marshalls, the Japanese effort in the islands was doomed from the start and the 28,000 troops deployed on the numerous islands in the chain were merely intended to delay the inevitable American victory. Thus, studying the campaign in the Marshalls has its limitations, since one side never intended to win and the question of superior generalship is a moot point under such circumstances. The author also details the opposing commanders and opposing forces in some detail, including a very detailed order of battle.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Charles E. Corway on December 8, 2009
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As with most Osprey campaign books, it is well-researched, concise and easy to follow. I currently live and work on Kwajalein Atoll (which looks a lot different today than what it was in WW II), so I have had the rare opportunity of following the course of the battle comparing actual sites on both Kwajalein and Roi-Namur with the narrative in the book. The island has expanded considerably in the 65 years since the battle, so many sites that were once at the edge of the original island are now farther inland. I highly recommend this book to the WW II enthsiast and for anyone planning on taking a job at Kwajalein and wanting to know more about the battle.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Dave Schranck on July 23, 2009
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This is one operation that I haven't read much about prior to this book so I learned quite a bit. According to the author there were nine phases to the operation, though two were the most important.

In the introduction, the author, probably using his encylopedia of Pacific Islands, describes all the pertinent Atolls and islands in the chain. The shapes, size, landmarks and distances from other islands are discussed. Some of the islands mentioned are Kwajalein, Roi / Namur, Ebeye, Majuro, Engebi, Eniwetok, Parry and a half dozen more. These will be the islands mentioned most in the Operation chapter.

The Chronology comes next; my initial impression was its too brief and in bad need of enhancement but with the 3-D maps, Mr Rottman gives hourly coverage of three of the major landings, making up for the brief Chronology.

The Opposing Plans for the US describes the schedule and which units willl take part in the capturing of the islands. I would have preferred more details but in this short brief, Mr Rottman does a good job. The author then describes the Japenese plan called Operation Z. This is an overall plan for defending the homelands and the remaining controlled islands, not just the Marshalls. A major portion of Operation Z relies heavily on the air force but the US is too strong and will disassemble their air force.

The Opposing Commanders is adequate while Opposing Forces, I found, very good. There are so many islands and so many units involved in taking the islands it could get confusing but Mr Rottman does a good job in explaining things.
The author spends the next 50 pages describing the actual assaults of the islands; some were more heavily defended than others.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Mike Dillemuth on April 1, 2011
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All in all, this book provides a good overview of the multiple battles that occurred in Operation Flintlock. The author, Gordon Rottman, organizes the battles in chronological order. In particular, he provides detailed coverage of the island battles of Roi-Namur, Kwajalein, Eniwetok, Burton, Engebi, and Parry.

One drawback is that too much time is spent on describing the geography and history of the various islands. Information on distances and elevations would be useful if it pertained to a battle. In this case, however, much of the information is superfluous.

The book contains several informative battle maps. They provide the names of the landing beaches and the specific units involved in each assault. The geographic maps are also helpful in indentifying the numerous islands in each atoll. Different islands are constantly identified in the text. Instead of losing orientation, the reader can keep going back to these maps for geographic reference. One downside is that readers will occasionally need a magnifying glass to see the names on the maps. The book has three 3D birds' eye view maps of the major battles on Roi-Namur, Kwajalein, and Engebi islands. Each of these is very good.

The book has a large number of black and white photos. These photos convey a clear image of events. Some photos are amazingly dramatic. For example, the author included a picture of the explosion at the Torpedo Warhead Warehouse on Namur Island. This explosion caused half the casualties suffered by the 24th Marines.

Bottom line: this book is well organized and easy to read. The author did a good job of consolidating several battles into one coherent narrative. Despite the difficulty of reading some of the maps, they are nevertheless helpful in allowing the reader to follow the campaign.
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