Qty:1
  • List Price: $29.00
  • Save: $2.86 (10%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: pages are clean easy to read ships fast with tracking
Access codes and supplements are not guaranteed with used items.
Sell yours for a Gift Card
We'll buy it for $3.48
Learn More
Sell It Now
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

The Masks of War: American Military Styles in Strategy and Analysis: A RAND Corporation Research Study Paperback – February 1, 1989

ISBN-13: 978-0801837760 ISBN-10: 0801837766 Edition: 1st

Buy New
Price: $26.14
29 New from $15.71 28 Used from $11.47
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$26.14
$15.71 $11.47
Free Two-Day Shipping for College Students with Amazon Student Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student


Best Books of the Year
See the Best Books of 2014
Looking for something great to read? Browse our editors' picks for 2014's Best Books of the Year in fiction, nonfiction, mysteries, children's books, and much more.

Frequently Bought Together

The Masks of War: American Military Styles in Strategy and Analysis: A RAND Corporation Research Study + And Keep Moving On: The Virginia Campaign, May-June 1864 (Great Campaigns of the Civil War) + Makers of Modern Strategy from Machiavelli to the Nuclear Age
Price for all three: $77.08

Buy the selected items together
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

China
Engineering & Transportation Books
Discover books for all types of engineers, auto enthusiasts, and much more. Learn more

Product Details

  • Series: Rand Corporation Research Study
  • Paperback: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Johns Hopkins University Press; 1 edition (February 1, 1989)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0801837766
  • ISBN-13: 978-0801837760
  • Product Dimensions: 5.8 x 0.6 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #84,156 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

Builder's provocative book is institutional profile at its best, probing far beyond the flip phrases that usually describe the essence of each service, e.g., that the Air Force likes things it can fly.

(Foreign AffairsA RAND Corporation Research Study)

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

13 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Charles F. Hawkins on July 31, 2000
Format: Paperback
The late Carl Builder researched and wrote this Rand Corporation study in the late 1980s. Its findings on military culture in the different services are as valid today as they were before the end of the Cold War ... perhaps more so.
To understand the behavior of the military services, which sometimes seems contradictory, it is necessary to delve into their cultural make up. Builder does this with clarity and insight based on years of intimate involvement as a defense analyst. The Air Force, for example, is the embodiment of a single idea, one that also happens to be a strategy of war. It is not love of the Air Force but love of flight and flying machines that is the common bond of its members.
The Navy, writes Builder, "jealously guards its independence and is happiest when left alone." It is perhaps the closest thing we have to a state within a state. The Army, on the other hand, is schizophrenic, viewing itself on the one hand as the loyal servant of the nation, but on the other hand the "heady memories of triumph in the closing months of World War II contradict this modest role."
We are left to ponder how conditions in the post-Cold War era, and particularly with the advance of technology, will affect these cultural outlooks and service behavior. Will the Air Force ever accept a pilotless cockpit in one of its planes? Will the Navy, drawn closer to the littorals and within global reach of communications, surrender some of its cherished independence? Will the stunning success of ground forces in Operation Desert Storm supplant the glow of victory in World War II for the schizophrenic Army?
"The Masks of War" is a terrific study and a great read. But it does leave some questions begging for answers.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By James H. Joyner, Jr. on November 21, 2002
Format: Paperback
The book is well written and provocative. I used to use it as a supplemental text for my graduate National Security Policy course and know others have used it that way as well. His characterizations of the culture of the individual armed services remains dead-on. Unfortunately, many of the examples are mired in the Cold War days and are therefore overtaken by events. Still, worth reading if you can find a copy on the cheap.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Joseph Begley on November 24, 1999
Format: Paperback
Mr. Builder does an excellent job of comparing and contrasting the styles of the three main branches of the U.S. military. From warfighting to peacetime, the approaches to missions, roles, procurement, leadership styles, and corporate cultures are studied. After reading it, I am convinced I should have joined the Army instead of the Navy.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again