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The Master (Blu-ray + DVD + Digital Copy)


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Product Details

  • Actors: Philip Seymour Hoffman, Joaquin Phoenix, Amy Adams, Jesse Plemons, Price Carson
  • Directors: Paul Thomas Anderson
  • Writers: Paul Thomas Anderson
  • Format: Multiple Formats, Blu-ray, Color, NTSC, Widescreen
  • Language: English
  • Subtitles: English, Spanish
  • Subtitles for the Hearing Impaired: English, Spanish
  • Region: Region A/1 (Read more about DVD/Blu-ray formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.85:1
  • Number of discs: 2
  • Rated: R (Restricted)
  • Studio: Weinstein
  • DVD Release Date: February 26, 2013
  • Run Time: 144 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 2.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (716 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B008220DIC
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #7,350 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)
  • Learn more about "The Master (Blu-ray + DVD + Digital Copy)" on IMDb

Special Features

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Editorial Reviews

A striking portrait of drifters and seekers in post-World War II America, Paul Thomas Anderson’s THE MASTER unfolds the journey of a naval veteran (Joaquin Phoenix) who arrives home from war unsettled and uncertain of his future–until he is tantalized by The Cause and its charismatic leader (Philip Seymour Hoffman).

Customer Reviews

I watched the whole movie but at the end just thought what a strange movie.
Anne Rice
While this is not P.T. Anderson's best film (I still say that is Magnolia), "The Master" is a solid effort with unique characters and an intriguing plot.
Ruined
Also, despite the fine acting performances and the incredible beautiful images, THE MASTER really isn't a very good movie.
tvtv3

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

249 of 289 people found the following review helpful By Timothy W. Moraca on January 17, 2013
Format: DVD
I was blown away by this film. The psychological realism is very demented and disturbing. I can understand why many are turned off by it. I talked to one person who said they didn't like the movie because the main characters had no redeeming qualities. Well, that's why I like the movie. So to see the film as a masterpiece first requires one to have a certain taste, to have an appreciation of characters and drama that are not attractive. Yes, the characters are disgusting, evil people, played ridiculously well by the actors. Yes, the psychological drama is absurd and revolting. This is an extremely dark film, I'd say much darker than PTA's last outing. It delves deep into human psychology, especially qualities of fear, delusion, exploitation, and rage, uncharted territory that is not commonly explored in mainstream cinema. Most do not want to explore these qualities of humanness at such an intimate level, most go to the movies for escapism and do not find as much entertainment in such forced introspection. Anyway, this film is the best I've seen in a long time. I expect it will be talked about for ages, reevaluated throughout the years and shown to be a stunning portrait of the underbelly of Americana.
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Format: Blu-ray
In an era when most studio movies are designed by consensus to appeal to the lowest common denominator, I have to acknowledge the true auteurs working within the system who are constructing distinctive and challenging projects. That said, I am an absolute nut for Paul Thomas Anderson and his previous film efforts. "Boogie Nights," "Magnolia" and "There Will Be Blood" were all squarely on my favorites list in the respective years that they were released. "The Master," to my mind, was the can't miss proposition of the fall season. While embraced by critics and awarded three Oscar nominations for its performances, the experience probably connected more with my mind than with my heart. I'm thrilled that some people proclaim this a brilliant masterwork, but I'm not surprised by the negative reaction either. It's a difficult movie that defies expectations at every turn. I do credit Anderson with making his vision, in this case--it is not something that connected with me in that way that I had hoped.

When I first heard of "The Master," it was described as the first major film about Scientology that isn't really about Scientology. Set in the 1950's, the story brings together a charismatic intellectual (Phillip Seymour Hoffman) and a troubled World War II veteran (Joaquin Phoenix). Hoffman is the leader of a new religious order (some may say cult) designed to provide spiritual guidance for those they deem lost. At first, Phoenix seems to welcome The Cause, as it is called, starting to fit in to the new movement. But the more he learns and experiences, the more conflicted he becomes. Is Hoffman a visionary or a charlatan? When the two men play off one another, the film crackles with vitality.
Read more ›
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186 of 227 people found the following review helpful By Doug Anderson VINE VOICE on September 22, 2012
Format: Blu-ray
This is a film about people searching desperately for a key to unlock the secrets of existence. And it focuses on two characters: one who can find no such key and one who convinces himself and others that he has found such a key. The former is Freddie Quell (Joaquin Phoenix) who we first meet on an unnamed beach in the South Pacific during the last days of WW11 and who we follow for some time as he unsuccessfully struggles to quell internal turmoil and establish some semblance of normalcy in post-War America; and the latter is Lancaster Dodd (Philip Seymour Hoffman) who is also battling unnamed dragons but who seems to have found some form of inner peace as the leader of an order/cult that promises members that human perfection is achievable in this lifetime if members allow themselves to be unlocked by Lancaster Dodd's magic key (which he calls processing). When Quell stows away on Dodd's yacht the two seem to recognize some common quality in each other. Dodd takes an interest in Quell's curious life, and as Quell learns more about Dodd's methods so do we. Processing is essentially psychoanalytic questioning that seeks to help members identify and neutralize past traumas so that they can eliminate negativity from their present lives and achieve that hoped for perfection. Its psychoanalysis but its psychoanalysis with a difference, the difference being that members are encouraged not only to recall past experiences but also to recall past lives. A lot has been made of the fact that this philosophy is loosely based on L. Ron Hubbards Scientology, but the film is less interested in the specifics of the actual philosophy than in the need of its followers to believe in something.Read more ›
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33 of 38 people found the following review helpful By Jeffrey H Wang on May 3, 2013
Format: Blu-ray Verified Purchase
The Master is a purposefully non-traditional film that most people won't like. I happened to be one of those who loved it. If you go to this film expecting a traditional, three-act narrative structure, with likeable characters and/or characters who will eventually be redeemed, then you have come to the wrong movie. This is not a Hollywood, feel-good movie about the triumph of the human spirit. Instead, The Master is a groundbreaking film that you have to watch with an open mind. Ultimately, The Master is an incisive exploration of the eternal struggle between the spirit and the flesh. As the cult leader, Phillip Seymour Hoffman represents the realm of logic and the mind, of science and rationality. He approaches life analytically and always needs to be in control of his surroundings, and the people in his life. Jouquin Phoenix, on the other hand, represents the unchecked flow of primal, animal nature. This the the central conflict in The Master...between someone who constantly needs to be in control of his life, and someone else who resists all methods of control and repression. The reason why this film alienates so many people is because of its disquieting portrayal of human nature--in the world presented in The Master, no matter where we run to, we're always presented with the startling realization that in this life, there is no escape or redemption, there is only the constant struggle for power and domination. The only thing that separates us from the animals, Paul Thomas Anderson seems to be saying, is an ultimately futile desire to find a higher force to comfort us, but what if that higher force is using us for its own purposes? I believe this question is what The Master is ultimately exploring.
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