Amazon.com: Customer Reviews: The Matrix Revolutions
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Let's get one thing straight: "The Matrix Revolutions" has none of the reality-bending plot twists nor the eye-opening originality of the first. The final chapter in the trilogy is an altogether different type of movie. Although it cannot compete against the original, it competes strongly against other entries in the action/adventure genre. With the requisite battle scenes that pit the underdog against a superpower, "The Matrix Revolutions" is a fast-paced, adrenalin-packed movie that owes its entertainment to action and special effects. Despite this, the viewer must listen and watch carefully, as in the other two, to understand why events unfold as they do.
The plot is difficult to detail without spoilers since many of the most shocking revelations come at the beginning, before the high-stakes battle scenes begin. Let it suffice to say that Neo has become something more than we thought, and as a result, he is much more of a threat to the nefarious virus Agent Smith. When the Oracle indicates (or does she?) that Neo is Zion's only hope, he and Trinity break off from the others who are hunkering down for an all-out assault of Zion. This is the strongest indicator that the third of the trilogy has stepped away from philosophical sci-fi and into pure action, as Neo and Trinity disappear from the screen for long stretches. Their onscreen time is limited, as is their plot; this will disappoint many diehard fans. Still, the action sequences are breathless (although eventually overdone) and the special effects are first-rate. The resolution of the trilogy is both surprising and inevitable, the hallmark of a well-prepared story. If you've been paying attention, it will make complete sense.
I recommend you approach this film without high expectations. Comparing it to the first will only disappoint you. Expect instead something along the lines of the "Terminator" movies, and you'll enjoy every minute.
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on November 9, 2003
Very good movie. Very intense action, but like the first two installments the plot is paramount. You can't take this movie at face value. It requires thought and analysis - and if you are able to give it some thought, I think you will enjoy it. I would also recommend checking out Reloaded within a day or so of going to see Revolutions.

Revolutions is Neo's continuing quest to figure out his purpose. The basic plot starts out in two directions - first, the machines moving towards Zion attempting to destroy the remaining humans who are freed. In addition, Agent Smith has made his way out of the Matrix into the "real world" in the form of Bane. Neo has found that his powers exists outside of the Matrix and now Smith has done the same. I equate Smith to a computer virus that continues to adapt. Smith is Neo's dramatic foil and the Oracle tells Neo that he and Smith are "negative twins".

Break for the very long intense fight between the humans and machines. Great battle scene (despite no Neo or Trinity). Suspense builds as we wonder if Zion can hold off the machines long enough to get support from Niobe & Morpheous.

After the fight, Neo makes peace with the machines by telling the machines that Smith is a threat to the machine world just as he is the matrix (at this point, Smith has overtaken the matrix). The machines then allow Neo to go into the Matrix and attempt to eliminate Smith - in the second film, Smith had adapted and was stronger (than he was in the first film) - unable to be destroyed by Neo. The big question is how will Neo destroy Smith and what will the implications be. The way Smith was finally destroyed was very profound.

Inside the Matrix, Smith overtook the Oracle, just as he had done to about everyone else inside the Matrix. We even saw some foreshadowing here, Smith (sounding frustrated) asked the Oracle "if you knew I was coming for you, why would you still be here". This was the Oracle's choice, and she knew that allowing Smith to overtake her would ultimately lead to his demise. The oracle said to Neo earlier, "Everything that has a beginning also has an end".

Another cool fight scene between Neo and Smith. Just as Neo was lying on the ground and nearly defeated, he finally realized how to defeat Smith. This realization came about when Smith said (standing over Neo), "I am now supposed to say - 'everything that has a beginning also has an end'". Neo then allowed Smith to overtake him, and then the machines pulled the plug that linked Neo into the Matrix. By pulling the plug, the machines killed Neo and since Smith had overtaken Neo, this ultimately killed Smith. Thus, Neo (major symbolism here - Neo is Christ-like) dies to save everyone else. Smith dies and everyone inside the Matrix that Smith had overtaken turned back into themselves - hence the Oracle lying on the ground where Smith was slain.

A cut scene shows the matrix "repairing" itself. The Oracle is sitting on a bench next to Seraph and the little girl (all of whom were earlier overtaken by Smith) and the architect tells the Oracle that she found a creative way to beat Smith. The end.

Conclusion - The matrix still exists. Big question - was the architect correct when he said at the end of Reloaded that Neo is an anomaly of the Matrix and that 5 others came before him and more will come after him? The little girl (sorry, can't remember her name) asks the Oracle if they will see Neo again and the Oracle says "I think so".

All we know is that the Matrix still exists and that for now the freed humans and the machines are going to coexist. Another question - will the machines continue to use humans for energy, or will those humans be freed - stay tuned...I think there is more to come.

There is a ton of Matrix philosophy on the this web site. But it is limited to the first film.

[...]

On the top right, go to the mainframe and then click the box that says philosophy. A good article on the religious symbolism is "Wake Up!" by Flannery-Dailey & Wagner.
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on November 15, 2003
I have no idea what the critics are griping about. This is a _great_ movie.
And I do _not_ mean that you should refrain from looking for anything 'deep' and just enjoy the action and special effects. Oh, the special effects are fantastic, all right. But the 'deep' ideas _are_ there, and you can find them if you know what to look for.
I think the problem is that so many viewers misunderstood the main theme of the first _Matrix_ film, taking it to be a movie about the question 'What is real?' Then they were disappointed when the next two films had little new to say on that question.
But that's not the main theme of this trilogy, or even of the first film. The theme is: 'What is the nature of the relationship between humans and machines?' And the resolution of _that_ question in the third film has every bit as much mind-blowing power as anything in the original _Matrix_.
The question does get answered, and the answer does make sense. All the tension in the plot comes down to whether Neo is really the 'One' and what it means to be the 'One'. Well, what _is_ the One? I won't tell you, but I _will_ tell you to pay very close attention to the relationship between Neo and Smith.
In this final film of the _Matrix_ trilogy, humans and machines achieve the next level in their symbiotic evolution. The Wachowskis have done it right; the critics have it wrong. Don't miss this one.
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on April 30, 2004
In the first Matrix, the W brothers took time away from the special effects and action sequences to EXPLAIN what was going on. There was a lot of explaining to do, and they made sure they did it. That's why people loved The Matrix. It was complex but it made sense.
In this film, the second sequel to the original, nothing is explained. Nothing makes sense. Characters show up and talk about philosophical concepts, making the plot pointlessly murky. The Oracle is a new woman, but it's not clear why (other than the fact that the original actress died). As the movie goes on, you find yourself collecting questions. Why is THAT happening? Why did they go THERE? Entire scenes have nothing to do with the plot. (Just try to figure out why the Merovingian is back. There's no explanation.)
Rather than clear things up, you get one of the most overblown action sequences in the history of film. And it's boring. Yes, the special effects are impressive, but they seem too computerized (or stolen from other sci-fi movies) to hold your attention. In the documentary on the second disc, the filmmakers show how most of these effects were created with models, not on a computer. How could the models look so fake? It's an amazing feat to turn something real into something that seems artificial.
I highly recommend avoiding this movie. It's simply a crude, thoughtless cash-in on the popularity of the first film. This movie (and Reloaded) will go down in history as the two worst sequels ever. The difference in quality between the first film and these sequels is so great, you can't help but wonder: What happened?
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on November 8, 2003
Story: A Acting: B Direction: A Visuals: A+ Overall Grade: A
Okay, first of all, I loved the first Matrix. I couldn't wait for the next 2. BUT I did not see Reloaded in the theater because the critics and my friends told me it was terrible. I listened to them and ignored it all the way until last week when I reluctantly rented the DVD. Much to my bittersweet chagrin, I liked it. A lot. The action + special effects were awesome (in the true sense of the word), the story was fluid and the themes dealt with were relevant and intelligently handled (the major theme being free will vs. predestination and how love works out out within that apparently paradoxical framework). Excellently executed in a taut, thrilling, butt-kicking, name-taking rollercoaster ride of a movie. Good stuff.
First lesson learned: Movies are subjective. Everyone has different tastes. Your taste is not mine. I will never listen with absolute attention to a critic or my friends again. Of course, I will weigh their opinions and tack them on to my "discretionary buffer zone" before deciding to see a movie - but I will never make an absolute decision based on others opinions in matters of subjectivity again. Second lesson learned: Expectations suck. (Which is probably why the critics and my friends were let down with Reloaded)
Now, onto dealing with Revolutions...from my perspective:
After my unexpectedly pleasant encounter with Reloaded, I eagerly anticipated seeing Revolutions. This time around, critically speaking, the critics reviews were tougher and my friends expectations were once again shattered. They either *liked* it, mildly disliked it or hated it. All were disappointed by it. Hmmm...what was I to think? I learned my lesson after seeing Reloaded...this time around I was going to ignore them and go into it with no expectations. I decided to let the story take me where it was going instead of me having a preconceived idea as to where I 'expected' it to go. I just saw it. I LOVED it.
First lesson reinforced: Critics suck. I can't fully trust my friends' judgments ever again. Second lesson reinforced: Drop expectations (of a subjective nature of course...moral expectations are a different ball game). Sometimes when it comes to judging film, instead of letting the storytellers take us on a journey, we become the backseat drivers. We kick and scream, begging the driver to change his/her course because it's not where we wanted to go. I surmise that this could be the reason that most folks disliked Revolutions. They jumped into the car wanting to go somewhere else.
Now Revolutions was definitely a change of atmosphere and pacing in comparison to the previous two. In this movie, most of the story took place in either ZION or a spacecraft. The feel of this movie reminded me of ALIENS (Alien 2)...dark and at times creepily suspenseful. And unlike the first Matrix and Reloaded, the filling isn't comprised of mind-blowing special effect laced - reality-defying kung-fu action sequences. Instead, the action, however quantified, is INTENSE in a different way. Replacing the usually ever-present hand-to-hand combat is a craaazy techno-war between the humans and machines with an insane amount of bullets being fired. FUN. Furthermore, for the first time in this trilogy, I felt a genuine sense of fear. I actually feared for the lives of the characters faced with imminent death. The Wachowski's did a tremendous job portraying courage in times of absolute terror...which is a large part of the movie. And the ending...wow...now this is RIDICULOUSLY COOL. Neo and Agent Smith duke it out for the last time. I must say that this is the BEST fight scene depicted in the trilogy (again...in my opinion). I left the theater very satisfied.
For many, the depth of philosophical exploration in the Matrix series was not adequate enough. I disagree. Although I concede that I did leave the theater with some questions still unanswered (ontological in nature), the simple truths brought out by this series WERE more than enough for me. Revolutions was a terrific compliment to the previous two, ending the series brilliantly - tying together the loose strings Morpheus, Trinity and the people of Zion were anticipating. Simplicity is often very profound. Faith. Hope. Courage. Love. Hate. Life. Death. Choice. Fate. These are the concepts the Matrix tautly grappled with - and with boldness like no other film I have ever seen. Simple concepts...yet each with significant relation to our core existence.
Now, the movie did end kind of open-ended. We weren't really given complete answers to everything. Well...I hypothesize that the Wachowski bros. left our questions insufficiently answered for a purpose. Not that they want us to believe there is another movie coming that will seek to offer further explanation, but they want us to choose what we believe. Maybe they want us to take the journey Neo and the others took instead of telling us plainly. If all the questions were answered, we wouldn't have to think. Now that would be a shame. Hmmmm...could it be? It's possible. :)
5/5 (Booyah!)
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on November 18, 2003
I am dumbfounded at how many people actually gave this film five stars. Imagine if Darth Vader, Luke Skywalker, Han Solo and Princess Lea where all given bit part roles to play in the final movie of the trilogy and Jabba the Hut, a Jawa, a Storm Trooper and an Ewok where made the central focus characters? Would you like that? Well this is EXACTLY what Revolutions does!
Okay so Terminator 3 was no Terminator 1 or 2, but it was satisfactory! Return of the Jedi was the weakest of the series but that too was satisfactory. Star Wars Ep.1 was nothing like the originals but again at least it was satisfactory.
Revolutions is nothing like the above. It is more akin to the kind of sabotage that we see in movie remakes!
The filmmakers obviously have absolutely no idea what made the first film so good. Reloaded and Revolutions have gone down the road of Disney cartoons instead of staying on the patch of action comic book type appeal. It was a tremendously bad call by the filmmakers to focus too much on Zion and bring bit-part characters to the forefront of the movie. Morpheus is forgotten about and does little more than sit in a co-pilot seat next to Niobe throughout the movie. It was Morpheus who made the metaphysical statements cool. When the same things are spoken by some bit part characters... (who are given a leading roles!... oh what a crisis!... you simply DO NOT DO THAT.)... it just sounds plain stupid and dumb. NEW CHARACTERS are introduced that serve very little function and are forgotten about just as quick. The Trainman appears as an important character and then... disappears. His whole scene at the start of the movie with Neo served absolutely NO PURPOSE. The Architect materializes briefly at the end for a few lines to try and consolidate everything. Persephone is back again with the Merovingian as if nothing is wrong after her releasing the Keymaker in Reloaded. The Twins who disappeared in Reloaded are obviously vaporized, because they are not here.
The original Matrix was a high like no other. Reloaded was satisfactory and at least had some knockout action sequences with elements that where in the first Matrix and a few extra scenes here and there to help develop the story around Zion. Okay so the dance scene at the start was totally out of place but in Reloaded as soon as Neo met the Oracle it was the Matrix rocking like you mother from start to finish. Revolutions is NOTHING like Reloaded and it certainly is at the opposite end of the spectrum when compared to the original Matrix.
Questions that where created in Reloaded are left unanswered. What is it with the Indian family who take up almost fifteen minutes talking at the start of the film? The copout for replacing the Oracle with a new actress is explained in the worst possible way..... AND WHOEVER WROTE THE SCREENPLAY DIALOGUE SHOULD HAVE HIS PAYCHECK REVOKED! What a cliche driven script! You will not believe the stereotype dialogue on display here! Seriously it is a SIN to do what they have done to the Matrix series. Watch the climatic scene between Neo and Trinity which lasts for ages. Listen to what they are saying! Watch Neo stand for a few minutes in stupidity as Bane, who sounds, talks and moves just like Agent Smith, almost has to tell Neo who he is before the penny drops with our savior character! Bill and Ted where on the screen for a few moments there. Sssshesshhh.....
The filmmakers have stamped all over this film as if they are out to harm the entire series - or maybe - is it just possible ..... that the first Matrix movie was just made a FANTASTIC MOVIE by accident? Everything on display in Revolutions seems to point to that conclusion.
There are only two key action sequences in this film. One which revolves around warriors controlling "Aliens" type robots with guns and the machines crashing around the place with lots of gun-fire and explosions. It is excellent stuff for the first few minutes but far too much time is spent on it. We WANT to see NEO getting it on with Agent Smith!... and finally ... (and it is a long time coming) when it appears, it is nothing compared to the Alleyway Brawl we saw in Reloaded.
This film is a disaster. Even if it where like Reloaded it would have been an acceptable movie but it seems almost like some sort of Direct to Video type movie. The filmmakers should never have given our principle characters a back seat to other bit part actors. They should have reduced the Zion fight sequence by at least three-quarters of the running time and put that space into Neo and Smith getting it on in some way shape or form. The screenplay should have been revised from the start instead of plowing so much money into the Zion action sequence. It is very hard to describe what an utter disappointment this film was. It could possibly be one of worst mega-budget pictures ever made. Fans will feel downright conned. Those who are looking for popcorn fodder will probably find it okay-ish entertainment but if we wanted to watch okay-ish entertainment we would hope to find that somewhere else other than in one of the most expensive sci-fi films ever made. Thank God that the Lord of the Rings is there to redeem our faith in high-concept large budget fantasy films. Revolutions is a prime example of a marketing confidence trick marred with bad acting, bad writing and bad direction. The special effects are on top form but this DOES NOT MAKE A MOVIE.
Revolutions is a bad stain on the Matrix series - if not trilogies as a whole. Fans should voice their disapproval so that this sort of humiliation does not happen again.
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on May 25, 2004
Ok so, I don't want to go into a big "blah blah" statement here. I'll try to keep this short.
In the first movie Neo is determined to free all humans from their enslavement by machines.In the end he makes a deal with the source to save Zion after it's pretty much destroyed. His deal is to let the machines continue to use humans as an energy source as long as they leave Zion alone.
In the first Matrix Neo is "the one", then in the second he isn't the "one", but one of many. Despite this he manages to transgress part of his humanity and actually has the ability to affect the machines in the physical world. In the third he can destroy the machines, and yet when confronted with the source does nothing. He strikes a deal.
In the first Matrix, Trinity is knowledgeble, powerful, a leader if only by example. In the second she's still tough, but nearly gets killed. Neo saves her from her untimely death; a death that would have made sense in the second movie. Trinity would have died for a reason, her personal "greater good". In the third movie she dies, because she dies. Her big kiss off is supposed to be alright because she found Neo. whatever.
Mr. Smith is a funny albeit normal agent in the first Matrix. In the second he is freed from the enslavement of the Matrix. That part is still kind of a , "huh?" to me, but it's okay because I love his character. In the third movie ,when it looks as though he could wipe out the Matrix, Neo stops him. Why? Losing all humankind is still better than submission to a force that could destroy you at any given time if you ask me. Besides you'd still have Zion, depending on whether or not they did what I'm about to mention.
Zion in the first Matrix is the last bastion of humans that the machines can't get to. In the second we see it, and it's a well gaurded city. We then discover they are drilling down. After the machines breach Zion and start swarming in; the human faction engages in closed combat with them. At a certain point in the third movie they use EMP bombs and it decimates a whole room full of squidies (machines). Why not place loads of these bombs while you have time in the second movie, ahead of where they are drilling, and have your forces fall back. It would have been a lot more economical than wasting complex machinery and human lives on an obviously ridiculous battle.
In going to a movie I'm asking to be whisked away for my $9. I don't go to a movie, let alone a sci-fi movie to be let down by a character I've invested time, money and aspirations in. I beleived Neo in the first movie when he says, "I'm going to show these people what you don't want them to see". When he agrees to let people stay batteries so that a single half destroyed city can stay intact, I'm heartbroken. I feel sold out. It's the equivalent of Luke Skywalker turning to the dark side and killing all his friends at the end of Star Wars, or Sauron getting the ring of power in the end of Lord of the Rings. Here's a little secret 'tween us; what made Lord of the Rings successful besides it's huge preexistant fan base, was that there was lots of hardship and struggle, just like the Matrix, but in the end even if by happenstance and luck the destruction of the ring took place. We got our money's worth, and our dedication and time spent payed off. I would have loved to see a good third Matrix, but alas I was deeply disappointed. My only regret is that I couldn't give this movie zero stars.
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on October 14, 2004
I thought Revolutions was an extremely satisfying ending to one of the best trilogies of all time. The conclusion of the movie seems to be knocked by people who simply don't understand it and don't have either the intelligence or the motivation to look beneath the film's glossy, special effects layers.

Neo brings about the end of the war in a quite brilliant way - Agent Smith has grown beyond the machines' control and threatens the Matrix's (and therefore the machines') very existance. All of a sudden the balance of power shifts - the machines need a human to save them (how ironic!). And this is precisely what happens. Neo (in a highly religious and symbolic ending) allows Smith to assimilate him. This gives the machines access to the Smith program, allowing them to destroy him.

In return for Neo's 'ultimate sacrifice' the war is called off and the salvation of Zion is assured.

This movie works on so many levels - particularly biblical and Greek mythological ones. Even 50 viewings would not catch them all. I love the Matrix trilogy because I discover new things every time I watch them. I know of no other set of films that are as spectacular to watch and as thought provoking at the same time as the three Matrix films - well deserving the five star rating.
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on August 10, 2004
Matrix Revolutions was interesting as sort of a post-modernistic blend of Christianity and Jungian psychology, but in the end it was a let down as an action adventure movie, and it's message was rather garbled.

The main positive for me was that they didn't resort of one of those ubiquitous finales where some sort of clock is ticking down to disaster, with the world saved with 2 seconds to spare.

But the ending was not very satisfying. Nothing was resolved in any way that seemed permanent. The main characters were abandoned and minor characters pushed to the front of the stage. What philosophical points it made were confused by the need to show something exploding, speeding, or performing Kung Fu every few minutes.
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on May 6, 2004
Having given the theatrical release of this movie 1 star, after viewing the DVD I can not say that my impressions have changed that much. In fact I can now clearly see why I did not like Revolutions and why many others did not like it either. The central problem with Revolutions is that bit-part actors and actresses are given leading roles that are immensely time consuming. So much so that everyone who made the first Matrix so good have literally been given a backseat to Niobi's driving skills or a token Kid that saves the day. Forget Morpheus's slick philosophical statements while dressed in black. Here he just wears a woolly jumper and sits around wondering just what is going on. Imagine if Darth Vader, Luke Skywalker, Han Solo and Princess Lea where replaced at the end of the trilogy with Jabba the Hut, a Jawa, a Storm Trooper and an Ewok made the central focus characters? Would you like that? Well this is EXACTLY what Revolutions does! Zion is really what has gone wrong here. By expanding the depth of the Matrix story the filmmakers have missed the mark of what made the first Matrix so good and this is a problem for the audience. In short, and for all intensive purposes, Revolutions does not resemble the original movie in any way shape or form. In fact the only thing that Revolutions has in common with the original film is the characters. Now we have been introduced to a battle between the machines and Zion - in an environment where Neo will not be found... or Morpheus ... or Trinity... or Agent Smith. This battle sequence is the BIGGEST part of the film. So for thirty odd minutes or so you will certainly NOT be watching any form of the Matrix... but heck this was never about the Matrix in the first place. Reloaded and Revolutions where designed to move between plot banality and theme-park type experiences WITHOUT the metaphysical `thought' and `dialogue' that made the original Matrix what it was. You are paying to see a empty spectacle - nothing more, nothing less.
Those who have done their homework will realize that the filmmakers have forgotten a lot and provided us with simple excuses so that they can bring on the next big special effects scene. Like I said already NEW CHARACTERS are introduced that serve very little function and are forgotten about just as quick. The Trainman appears as an important character and then... disappears. His whole scene at the start of the movie with Neo served absolutely NO PURPOSE. The Architect materializes briefly at the end for a few lines to try and consolidate everything. Persephone is back again with the Merovingian as if nothing is wrong after her releasing the Keymaker in Reloaded. The Twins who disappeared in Reloaded are obviously vaporized, because they are not here. What happens to Seraph? What happened to the Merovingian? They are here in Revolutions but don't expect they actually play an important role in much because whatever they say or do means nothing by the time the end credits role and here is also another problem. The ENDING of the original Matrix is so much better than Revolutions that the sequels seem pointless. But there we really have summed it up. This is a money making high budget sci-fi movie, end of story. People are going to watch it so why not experiment? Sadly that experiment does not pay off simply because it breaks too many rules... rules that the original Matrix created for us. The original Matrix was a high like no other. Reloaded was satisfactory and at least had some knockout action sequences with elements that where in the first Matrix and a few extra scenes here and there to help develop the story around Zion. Okay so the dance scene at the start was totally out of place but in Reloaded as soon as Neo met the Oracle it was the Matrix rocking like you mother from start to finish. Revolutions is NOTHING like Reloaded.
Like we said questions that where created in Reloaded are left unanswered. What is it with the Indian family who take up almost fifteen minutes talking at the start of the film? The copout for replacing the Oracle with a new actress is explained in the worst possible way..... AND WHOEVER WROTE THE SCREENPLAY DIALOGUE SHOULD HAVE HIS PAYCHECK REVOKED! What a cliche driven script! You will not believe the stereotype dialogue on display here! Watch Neo stand for a few minutes in stupidity as Bane, who sounds, talks and moves just like Agent Smith, almost has to tell Neo who he is before the penny drops with our savior character! Bill and Ted where on the screen for a few moments there. Sssshesshhh.....
The bottom line here is that this film is a disaster. Even if it where like Reloaded it would have been an acceptable movie but it seems almost like some sort of Direct to Video type release on a big budget. It is very hard to describe what an utter disappointment this film was. It could possibly be one of worst mega-budget pictures ever made. Fans will feel downright conned. Those who are looking for popcorn fodder will probably find it okay-ish entertainment but if we wanted to watch okay-ish entertainment we would hope to find that somewhere else other than in one of the most expensive sci-fi films ever made!!!!! Thank God that the Lord of the Rings is there to redeem our faith in high-concept large budget fantasy films. Revolutions is a bad stain on the Matrix series - if not trilogies as a whole. As a fan I have voiced my disapproval, it is little more than I can do, but what do they care laughing all the way to the bank???
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