The Meadow and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Meadow Hardcover – April, 1992


See all 11 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$68.18 $1.36
Audio CD, Audiobook, CD
"Please retry"
Cards, Audiobook
"Please retry"
--This text refers to the Paperback edition.

God Help the Child by Toni Morrison
God Help the Child
Among other things, Nobel Prize–winning author Toni Morrison's latest is about a mother who takes a lifetime to come to understand that "what you do to children matters. And they might never forget." Learn more | See related books
Available from these sellers.
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 230 pages
  • Publisher: Henry Holt & Co; 1st edition (April 1992)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0805016848
  • ISBN-13: 978-0805016840
  • Product Dimensions: 1 x 6 x 8.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 13.6 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (82 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #484,328 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

These ragged sketches of ranch life along the Wyoming-Colorado border depict Galvin's neighbors--hardscrabble folk--in wry, stoic stories of skill, survival and loss that flash back and forth across 100 years of the high meadow's history. The author's ( Imaginary Timber ) style of lyrical reserve is sufficient to preserve Lyle, Ray, Clara and Appleton in prose amber, but he is too respectful of Lyle to press him on why his sister Clara left the ranch and blew her brains out. The prose soars only in descriptions of weather in the meadow, of Lyle's ax work and Ray's machinery. Still, there is spare beauty here, and readers of Richard Ford, Jim Harrison and Rick Bass will feel at home in Galvin's country.
Copyright 1992 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From School Library Journal

YA-- A true story that reads like a novel, its focal point being a piece of land in the Neversummer Mountains on the Colorado-Wyoming border. In a series of vivid vignett e s and short sketches, Gavin records the 100-year history of the meadow and the few people who lived and died there. His description of every facet of life there, its seasons, the weather, the wildlife, is so evocative that readers can easily understand why its inhabitants care so much about it. This fine piece of regional writing will recall the land and people of the American West to anyone who has been there, and introduce them to those who have not. It is a book that would grace any collection. --Pamela B. Rearden, Centerville Regonial Library, Fairfax County, VA
Copyright 1993 Reed Business Information, Inc.

Customer Reviews

The result is a beautiful book written in a spare style.
D. E. MCIVOR
This book reminds us of the simple pleasures of life, the things that pass us by everyday as we go about our lives.
Kania Shain
I knew the area very well as well as nearly all the people.
Roy W. Lilley.....age 82

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

30 of 31 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on November 3, 1999
Format: Paperback
I read The Meadow. Read it again. Skipped to some of my favorite sections. Read them. Read the whole thing over again. Loaned it to my mother. She read it. Handed it to my father. He read it. My mother took it to her book club. Four members of the book club read it. I took it to work. Three coworkers read it. The book finally fell apart. So I bought a new copy. The images of life on the Meadow will undoubtedly stay with me for ages.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
31 of 33 people found the following review helpful By Ronald Scheer on February 14, 2003
Format: Paperback
This is a book to savor. Its chapters fall somewhere between vignettes and prose poems, and reading the book is like leafing through an album of old photographs. The storyline is made up of the threads of connections to be made between each of the word-pictures. The book itself seems to be neither fiction nor nonfiction. Galvin refers to himself and his family in some of the chapters, but the person at the center of the book is a neighbor, Lyle Van Waning, who has spent most of his life living near the meadow of the book's title, in the high elevations between Laramie, Wyoming, and Ft. Collins, Colorado.
By today's standards of urban comforts and conveniences (many of which have found their way into lives of people who live far from the city), Lyle lives a kind of pioneer existence, isolated much of the year by deep snow, living by his skills as a carpenter and builder, and the proceeds of hay harvested from his meadow, and spending the time when he can do neither of these in his shop making machinery parts, carved wooden boxes, firearms, and whatever else captures his fascination. He is an immensely private and self-sufficient man, who never marries and seems to hold in his heart the strongest connection with a dead sister who committed suicide. (A painting by Clara Van Waning appears on the cover of the book.) Galvin captures in Lyle the kind of fiercely independent spirit that made survivors of those who first settled and thrived in the American wilderness.
There are other men and women associated with the meadow. And their stories are also told, including App Worster and his son Ray, whose family owns the meadow before the Van Wanings, and who lose it during the Depression.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By SN Reader/Traveler on October 27, 1999
Format: Paperback
Galvin uses a kind of stream of consciousness, though instead of being inside a character's mind, the reader is tied to the land. Once the structure becomes apparent, one follows the author's meanderings back and forth through the history and people who've lived on or passed through the meadow. Using powerful imagery and compelling people, Galvin shows how we in the West feel about our area. A sense of place is the focal point for many of our lives. Those who can live "just anywhere there's a job" won't understand, but for those who identify with the land in the West , it's an unforgettable work.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
11 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Pamela on May 20, 2002
Format: Paperback
I was absolutely stunned by the superb story telling and the poetic quality of the well-crafted prose in James Galvin's _The Meadow_. This is *literature.* So if you have literary tastes and an interest in the American west, there is absolutely no doubt that you will enjoy this wonderful book.
The realism of rural life in the mountains is combined with haunting personal stories that keep you reading. The author has a genuine empathy for nature and for the individual people who have the stamina to survive in a harsh environment. Highly recommended.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Mark Bailey on April 14, 2011
Format: Paperback
Before I moved to the foothills of Northern Colorado, I had imagined the West to be an amalgamation of images that have, for better or worse, perpetuated the Western Myth: saloon doors and crooked sheriffs, hookers hanging off of poles on hotel porches, horses bucking handsome riders, and throngs of hollow-eyed men wearing suspenders and wide-brimmed hats, their mustaches blanketing unsmiling mouths. These are the pictures I believed in as a boy growing up in the MidWest; these pictures were the truth of the Great Beyond. To me, the West was a perpetual motion picture, a setting for lives of endless action and excitement that ended with a ride into the sunset, if it ever ended.

I am not the only one who has carried this misconception into town. The false romance of the West baited most of the early settlers and trappers, and it still digs its claws into the hearts of Midwestern boys even today. James Galvin, in his beautifully crafted book The Meadow, contradicts this Western idyll and shares instead the stories of an isolated, self-reliant, and occasionally desperate people who inhabit a different West, a country whose moods and whims oppose popular representations. Galvin's unsung West is not glamorous, not cartoonish or flamboyant. It is the Western experience without movie cameras, without damsels in distress, and without sympathy.

Set along the Colorado/Wyoming border, The Meadow follows a peculiar cast of men and women who are trying to create lives out in this sparse and lonely territory across the expanse of the 20th Century. These are stubborn characters, people whose commitment to Home requires patience, compromise, and oftentimes surrender. They are not merely products of their environment, but extensions of it.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?