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The Meat Fix: How a Lifetime of Healthy Living Nearly Killed Me! Paperback – June 19, 2012


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The Meat Fix: How a Lifetime of Healthy Living Nearly Killed Me! + The Vegetarian Myth: Food, Justice, and Sustainability
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Biteback Publishing (June 19, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1849541396
  • ISBN-13: 978-1849541398
  • Product Dimensions: 0.9 x 5.2 x 8.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 9.9 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (20 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,176,549 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

John Nicholson: John Nicholson is the star columnist of www.football365.com, and author of We Ate All the Pies, which was long listed for the William Hill Prize 2010.


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Customer Reviews

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See all 20 customer reviews
The author writes about it so well.
AeroBook
This is a very entertaining read, I laughed out loud and read many passages to whichever of my long suffering family were within hearing.
LJQ309
Let me be the first to review the book "The Meat Fix: How a lifetime of healthy eating nearly killed me! by John Nicholson."
Sondra G. Oravetz

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

13 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Catskinner on August 17, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
While this book doesn't contain anything new to anyone who read Gary Taubes "Good calories, bad calories, or his more recent "Why we get fat, and what to do about it", it is still a worthy reading companion to those who seeks a different point of view and a witty and sarcastic British narrative.

It's more like Tom Naughton "Fat Head" movie - a good introduction into everything that is wrong with the modern Western diet, told with with good humor and plenty of factual refutations of the current medical establishment advise, same advise that would load you up with carbs and sugars in order to treat you later for diabetes type 2 or worse.
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34 of 42 people found the following review helpful By SomeRandomGuy on August 10, 2012
Format: Paperback
Much like Lierre Keith's "The Vegetarian Myth", John Nicholson's "The Meat Fix" is an amazing semi-autobiography of one person's coming to the realization that veganism and even vegetarianism is not the healthy diet and lifestyle it's cracked up to be, with the pain and suffering of not merely months or a year or two, but nearly THREE DECADES worth of it!

But that's where the similarities between the two books end. The styles could not be more different, and that is for the best. While I found Keith's book filled with interesting revelations, especially about showing the reader that eating vegan or vegetarian does not necessarily contribute to saving the environment (the fact that it really does great harm is a golden piece of enlightenment almost worth the price of the book for that alone), Keith unfortunately has a tendency to go off on radical feminist and Luddite diatribes that can turn a number of people off to the more important overall message and information in her book.

Nicholson, on the other hand has a fantastic sense of humor that is often quite self-depreciating, does not go off into fringe radicalism and puts the issues in perspective squarely in terms of his own experiences.

Like Keith, he goes into telling us why someone would put up with this sort of thing for two decades or more; zealotry. Plain and simple, the power of the conviction of blind faith so strong that one will endure any self-induced cruelty. Keith puts it in terms of a little girl wanting to save the planet, while Nicholson puts it in terms of self-satisfaction and smugness at supposedly doing the healthy and moral thing because the "experts" and hippies told him so, and in doing so ignored the years of advice from his parents and their parents before them and so on.
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11 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Celestial Abyss on November 28, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
It turns out that a vegan diet (long term) doesn't work for a lot of folks.

The author details over 26 years of vegan dietary eating, and finally giving that up because of IBD-like symptoms (and constant headaches, etc.) One serious point he makes is the (western) vegan attitude towards soy "foodoid" products -- totally industrial and so new to our system of food that one wonders and wonders... Many vegans have no problem chowing down soy foodoid products or highly gluten-saturated stuff like "seitan".

I'm much more impressed with vegetarian diets of long standing, as exist in India, where vegetarians (NOT vegans) eat ghee and paneer-style cheese, and avoid soy (unless fermented), and fake foodoid items such as faux cheese, faux burgers, and other undesirable byproducts of modern life.

This is a really good book. The author writes in a Brit style, bloody this and bloody that, and soy is spelt soya. But more importantly, he writes about his early upbringing, where people ate to nourish themselves. We did well, then. It's all the low fat and weird stuff we eat now that is bringing us down (and our body weights up). While his grandparents thought foreign cuisine to be from the devil, they also thought processed foods to have the same ultimate source.

He's not a dogmatist. He writes from the heart of his own experience. He returned to a diet which includes meat, and excludes nearly all soy, and solved his IBD and headache issues. He acknowledges an Omega-3 focus in fats.

No, his dietary healthy results don't equal "My Plate" here in the USA, but neither do mine. Worth the read.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By LJQ309 on June 23, 2013
Format: Paperback
The author explains the history of his family and the way they ate, and gives a hilarious view of British culinary delights at the same time. Nicholson tells his story of how he became vegetarian for 26 years and how that way of eating left he and his partner feeling very: very ill. He explains his symptoms in graphic and funny detail and he details his interactions with medical specialists in a way that made me just want to scream... him too I imagine. He goes on to discuss how they decided to go back to eating meat and the process they went through, from the way they felt about buying meat to detailed descriptions about how the first few meat meals were cooked and consumed.

The book also contains easily digestible snippets from the history of why we are told to eat the way most of us are used to - the food pyramids, my plates etc - and how the author thinks we should eat. Nicholson very strongly believes that we should eat home made foods as much as possible, that meats and fats are vitally important, fruit and vegies perhaps not as important as we are led to believe, and the starches, sugars and grains should be avoided for many of us. But he does also strongly feel that we must all work out what it is that works for us.

This is a very entertaining read, I laughed out loud and read many passages to whichever of my long suffering family were within hearing. This is also an easy book to read, the science is minimal and worded simply. I feel that this book has broad appeal but in particular I think it might appeal, much more than many other books, to males who aren't really readers and who like a bit of a laugh, don't mind the odd bit of swearing, and appreciate the British sense of humour. A great read and highly recommended.

http://healthierjane.com
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