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The Men Who Lost China


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Product Details

  • Actors: Dave Hickman - Narrator, GUNGWU WANG PHD, MINXIN PEI PHD, RICHARD BAUM PHD, YANG RUI
  • Directors: Mitch Anderson
  • Format: Multiple Formats, HiFi Sound, NTSC, Widescreen
  • Language: English
  • Subtitles: Mandarin Chinese
  • Region: All Regions
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Studio: Deep Waters Films
  • DVD Release Date: May 15, 2013
  • Run Time: 52 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B00CIYZW0E
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #497,310 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)

Editorial Reviews

It is often said that history is the sum total of the things that could have been avoided. While a tremendous amount of literature has been devoted to the turning points of the Western History, little attention has been paid to the US and European policies towards the Chinese Revolution of 1911 and the Middle Kingdom s involvement in World War One. As today s China is gaining its undisputed superpower status, the world press speculates with tremor of its intentions. However, any worthy prediction must be rooted in the diligent study of past events and the comprehension of the Western and Chinese perception of these events. The US involvement in Revolution of 1911 and the perceived Western betrayal in the aftermath of World War One are the two most pivotal points in the Chinese modern history. Their memory is deeply etched in the Chinese national identity and these two milestones will affect the Beijing government outlook for decades to come. This documentary aims to enlighten anyone interested in the history Far East and the in the future of the East-West power balance. Subtitled in English, Chinese and Spanish.

Customer Reviews

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See all 10 customer reviews
I found it very surprising.
B. Hauser
This documentary analysis is comprehensive and informative and a valuable tool in assessing how past events are affecting the modern global community.
Elaine Smith
I would highly recommend this to anyone with an interest in Chinese history, World War history or the modern shaping of global powers.
Justin H

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By B. Hauser on August 17, 2013
This is a remarkable documentary covering the history of China in the first half of the 20th Century. It shows how after centuries of monarchy, there were a number of opportunities for China to become a modern, democratic republic. Those opportunities were squandered, however, and this film explains the reasons, most of which I wasn't aware. I found it very surprising.

The overall failure of Western diplomacy, especially the US, to befriend China early on (after the fall of the last emperor), and then again and again when the chances were there, is one of the great tragedies of the last hundred years or so, I think, and this film points out all the familiar reasons: self-interest, hypocrisy, arrogance, simple inattention and incompetence--the list is endless. (A couple of World Wars didn't help, either.)

But at the top of the list you'd have to put straight ignorance: our ignorance of Chinese history, culture, thought and sensitivities, plus Chinese misunderstanding of Western motives (and idealism). I think this documentary and other programs like it go a long way toward rectifying that situation.

This is especially interesting and thought-provoking because so many Middle Eastern nations are trying to make the same transition from totalitarianism to democracy that might have been China's road a hundred years ago. Making that shift--zero to democracy in years, not centuries--at the moment doesn't look like it's going to work for the people of the Middle East any better than it worked for China, but we in the US are still working on it after a couple of hundred years and one civil war, so maybe it just takes time.

It would be nice if we didn't make the same mistakes with Egypt, Syria, Iran, Iraq, Libya and Turkey that we made with China, but right now it sure looks like the same movie again.

"Those who cannot learn from history are doomed to repeat it." -- George Santayana
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By C. Dan on June 8, 2013
I was a bit skeptical about what seemed a low budget, no name documentary, but I was pleasantly surprised by how good it turned out to be.
The writer did extensive research on the intricacies of the East-West politics of a hundred years ago, and this definitely shows in the film. The story was laid out logically and drew me in, by the end of the film, I wished the makers went even deeper in the subject matter.
Finally the film made me reflect on how the misguided decisions our leaders made a century ago, still haunt us now.

Good job to the makers,

I also enjoyed

China From the Inside
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Jean Le Lupi on May 23, 2013
I watched countless WW1 documentaries, including a "WW1 in Color" believe it or not... They are generally very well done but they all have been neglecting the Far East. They all seem to cover the same things: the Sarajevo assassination, the battles of Verdun, the birth of USSR, but lets face it, a hundred years from now all these events will become footnotes on history books. A colossus is rising from the Far East, and weather we like it or not, the way China feels about us, "The West", will one day matter more than everything else. Yet, historians and authors are rather slow in delving in the deep issues of Asian history.
I guess there is an inertia in the curriculum, like in everything else. Generation after generation of professors hands down textbooks covering our over glorified "History of the Western world", while Far East matters are reserved for "Asian Studies" classes.

Well, I am glad to see that this film is an exception to the rule. While is still far from a complete analysis of the China-West interaction at the beginning of the 20th century, I must confess that it made me realize how much I didn't know about the history of that region.

Kudos to the makers. I'd strongly recommend it to anyone.

PS, I also liked:
The World Without US - With Niall Ferguson
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Mitch Anderson on May 23, 2013
In the age of cheap sensationalism, it was quite refreshing to see the subject of China being treated seriously for a change.
Great storytelling, great interviews and research.
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By C. A. on August 31, 2013
An hour-long documentary about the late 19th century - beginning of the 20th century China and the US involvement in the region. It's well informed, very detailed and educational. Although it's an independent documentary, it is professionally made. It raises many interesting questions - in fact, I think that is its strongest point: it leaves you with many more questions than it answers. In this case this is a good thing because one feels better educated on a very current subject in the modern world and better informed and prepared to follow developments on it. Interesting piece of work.
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