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The Metastases of Enjoyment: On Women and Causality (Radical Thinkers) Paperback – January 17, 2006


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The Metastases of Enjoyment: On Women and Causality (Radical Thinkers) + For They Know Not What They Do: Enjoyment as a Political Factor (Radical Thinkers) + Tarrying with the Negative: Kant, Hegel, and the Critique of Ideology (Post-Contemporary Interventions)
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Product Details

  • Series: Radical Thinkers (Book 12)
  • Paperback: 228 pages
  • Publisher: Verso (January 17, 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1844670619
  • ISBN-13: 978-1844670611
  • Product Dimensions: 0.8 x 5.2 x 7.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 9.1 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,110,003 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

“Discussing Hegel and Lacan is like breathing for Slavoj.”—Judith Butler

“The most formidably brilliant exponent of psychoanalysis, indeed of cultural theory in general, to have emerged from Europe in some decades.”—Terry Eagleton

“The Giant of Ljubljana provides the best intellectual high since Anti-Oedipus.”—Village Voice

About the Author

Slavoj Žižek is a Slovenian philosopher and cultural critic. He is a professor at the European Graduate School, International Director of the Birkbeck Institute for the Humanities, Birkbeck College, University of London, and a senior researcher at the Institute of Sociology, University of Ljubljana, Slovenia. His books include Living in the End Times, First as Tragedy, Then as Farce, In Defense of Lost Causes, four volumes of the Essential Žižek, and many more.

More About the Author

"The most dangerous philosopher in the West," (says Adam Kirsch of The New Republic) Slavoj Zizek is a Slovenian philosopher and cultural critic. He is a professor at the European Graduate School, International Director of the Birkbeck Institute for the Humanities, Birkbeck College, University of London, and a senior researcher at the Institute of Sociology, University of Ljubljana, Slovenia. His books include "First as Tragedy, Then as Farce;" "Iraq: The Borrowed Kettle;" "In Defense of Lost Causes;" "Living in the End Times;" and many more.

Customer Reviews

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8 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Edward G. Nilges on November 29, 2007
Format: Paperback
Zizek writes in the tradition of Adorno, because he takes the Continental philosophical tradition seriously, and, he understands it. I don't pretend to understand this book in full, but, reading it is not as anhedonic as my first encounter with Adorno in the 1980s, when I forced myself to attend to Adorno as a form of therapy-in-recovery.

That's because Zizek is much more chukka chukka hip about popular culture and uses it, along with the canon, to make his points, whereas Adorno would refer to far more obscure literary texts.

But both write in the shadow of what Arthur Koestler called a god that failed (Communism). Zizek writes as another Moloch, another god, fails, and that's globalized capitalism where the condition of entry is self-objectification narrated as freedom to choose.

Freedom to choose...what? Zizek writes from the standpoint of the idle fellow temporarily stranded in a small city on business back when there were movie theaters showing second-run films, and who wanders into the theater like Parsifal in the enchanted castle or at the puppet show, and masochistically gives himself over to an enjoyment which hasn't yet metastasised into its perverse reverse.

The chapter on the extreme, almost catatonically anti-feminist Otto Weininger is interesting because unlike traditional political movements, feminism doesn't get to see its opposite. The reaction towards feminism hastens, whether religious or not, for the most part, to agree with its adversary and to make all sorts of concessions which are often accepted with a great deal of suspicion...as if feminism sought more an adversary like the late Norman Mailer with a mind of his own, who believed feminism just wrong and who invited many feminists to fart in a bottle and paint it.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Etienne ROLLAND-PIEGUE on April 14, 2012
Format: Paperback
Who said that woman doesn't exist? Before becoming one of Lacan's favorite aphorisms--along with "there is no sexual relationship"--, this denial of woman's existence was pronounced by a minor Austrian philosopher in the beginning of the twentieth century. Born in Vienna in 1880, Otto Weininger died young: he committed suicide at the age of 23, not before publishing his maiden work, Sex and Character, in 1903. This essay, and the dramatic death of its author, had an impact on Viennese circles around that date: Ludwig Wittgenstein held the book in high esteem, and it may have inspired other Viennese luminaries.

But the truth of the matter is that Sex and Character was a misogynistic and antisemitic tract. For Weininger, woman was entirely dominated by sexuality: "Woman is only and thoroughly sexual, since her sexuality extends to her entire body and is in certain places, to put it in physical terms, only more dense than in others." Woman lives only for sex: "The idea of pairing is the only conception that has positive worth for women." The female life is consumed with the sexual function: both with the act, as a prostitute, and the product, as a mother. By contrast, the duty of the male, or the masculine aspect of personality, is to strive to become a genius, and to forego sexuality for an abstract love of the absolute, God, which he finds within himself.

Why does Zizek reproduce this sexist babble? What need is there to unearth this case of fin-de-siècle anti-feminism? The reason is that, for Zizek, there is no better way to conceal a crime than to confess it right away. Zizek specializes in borderline statements and outright provocations. His readiness to discuss anti-Jews propaganda, or violence against women, should not be read as an endorsement of hate speech.
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4 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Cynthia Liang on November 8, 2007
Format: Paperback
This book is complied of 6 short essays by Zizek. Here we have postmod writing; however, not as difficult as Derrida.

Zizek goes through a genealogy of psychoanalysis & film featuring Freud, Deleuze, Lacan, Hegel, Habermas & Frankfurt School, Derrida, Weininger and Lynch. He proceeds to discuss courtly love and anti-feminisms of Weininger.

His marxist inclinations do not come out as strongly as I thought he would.

His logic and analysis are not too difficult to follow but definitely require several re-reads.

The essays are well structured one after the other. I think this is a cohesive compilation. I have yet to read The Ticklish Subject but I have high expectations for it.

I find his essay on courtly love well-written - not surprising in thoughts but the writing is pleasurable to read. He's a feminist to an extent.
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