Qty:1
  • List Price: $62.00
  • Save: $6.20 (10%)
Only 2 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
Used: Like New | Details
Sold by be_bop_bookshop
Condition: Used: Like New
Comment: Binding is tight; pages are bright; text has no markings. DJ is bright and crisp. Hardcover.
Add to Cart
Trade in your item
Get a $1.35
Gift Card.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Minimum Dwelling Hardcover – July 30, 2002


See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$55.80
$36.40 $37.28
Paperback
"Please retry"

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

China
Engineering & Transportation Books
Discover books for all types of engineers, auto enthusiasts, and much more. Learn more

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 360 pages
  • Publisher: The MIT Press; 1st edition (July 30, 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0262201364
  • ISBN-13: 978-0262201360
  • Product Dimensions: 10.2 x 7.1 x 1.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.4 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,901,364 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

"Today's proletarian dwellings... despite their current revolting appearance of hovels, housing barracks or overnight shelters, will be reproduced in the future on a higher level." Say what you will about his dubious faith in socialist housing schemes, celebrated Czech avant-garde artist and designer Karel Teige (1900-1951) elaborates some provocative and humane ideas for modern housing. His treatise The Minimum Dwelling (1932), translated into English for the first time by MIT architecture professor and Teige scholar Eric Dluhosch, surveys interwar European housing and argues, among other things, for the demise of the eat-in kitchen (the proletariat have no time to cook) and suggests the hotel, with its centralized services, as an ideal model for workers' dwellings.
Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information, Inc.

From Library Journal

A Communist architect and theorist, the Czechoslovakian-born Teige (1900-51) aimed to develop, as scientifically as possible, a modern architecture that solved housing shortages. In this book, first published in Czechoslovakia in 1932, he detailed the need to develop a new model, especially for those suffering from tuberculosis. After looking at 19th-century dwellings, Teige considered the European housing exhibitions of his era and compared the nature of the modern house with that of the modern apartment. He also looked critically but admiringly at theories of multiunit designs by Le Corbusier, Gropius, and Wright. He then proposed the Socialist concept, adopted by kibbutzim in Israel, of abandoning the family household and socializing children at a very early age. With statistical tables, numerous interior and exterior views, floor plans, axonometric projections, and quotations from philosophers at the start of chapters, this book is a virtual synthesis of Teige's ideas. Teige was among the first to observe that the importance of the kitchen in the modern dwelling had decreased, and his commitment to small, economic spaces, in contrast to Le Corbusier's villas, expresses the true sense of the machine a habiter. For larger collections. Paul Glassman, New York Sch. of Interior Design Lib.
Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information, Inc.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
1
4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See the customer review
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Margaret Picky TOP 500 REVIEWER on February 3, 2010
Format: Hardcover
The Minimum Dwelling explores the social aspects of early twentieth century domestic architecture and the problem of providing salubrious housing for the working masses. This is a new (and first) English translation of the original work published in Czech in 1932 and it is long overdue.

The author, Karel Teige, was a well-known figure in his time, influential in CIAM and the international architectural dialogue of the 1920s and '30s. He was an avowed Marxist and he saw minimum dwellings for families merely as a step towards community housing in which every individual would live in a small cell and functions such as food preparation and consumption would take place in shared space, similar to a hotel. The discussion treats all aspects of the housing problem in a holistic manner that reminds us how daring the golden era of early modern architecture was, even by today's standards.

The translation is very competent and respectful of the original book and readers should take the time to read the translator's notes in the foreword to fully appreciate this. There are over 400 pages of text, photographs, and plans. Works by many unfairly-obscure architects are presented alongside those by architects who have become well-known in the intervening years.

The Minimum Dwelling still manages to convey the spirit, excitement, and freshness of the time in which it was written. Very highly recommended.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Search