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The One Minute Manager Meets the Monkey Paperback – January 1, 1989


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The One Minute Manager Meets the Monkey + The One Minute Manager + Leadership and the One Minute Manager Updated Ed: Increasing Effectiveness Through Situational Leadership II
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 144 pages
  • Publisher: Quill; 1st edition (January 1, 1989)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0688103804
  • ISBN-13: 978-0688103804
  • Product Dimensions: 8.3 x 5.5 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 6.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (95 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,039 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

In this latest in the One Minute Manager series, the authors chastise executives who never have time for family or their own job enhancement because they accept too many responsibilities--"monkeys" clinging to their backs--that properly belong to their staffs. Based on seminars conducted by the late Oncken, the book explains in simple-minded if abstract terms how to achieve a balance between supervision and delegation for reduced tension and improved productivity. "There is a high correlation between self-reliance and morale," stress the authors. With humor and logic they describe the delicate business of assigning monkeys to the right masters and keeping them healthy, i.e., fed and cared for: " . . . if monkeys are managed properly, you don't have to manage people so much." Unequivocal assignments, proper coaching and interim check-ups, according to this program, can lead to effective delegation and, with it, a better life at home and office. BOMC selection.
Copyright 1989 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

Review

"Helpful, insightful...fits the one-minute theme perfectly." -- --Booklist

"Outstanding! Delightful reading and first-rate advice." -- --Forrest Patton, Author of Psychology of Closing Sales; President, Patton Communications Houston, Texas

"The 'Monkey Story' humorously illustrates invaluable principles for managers at all levels, principles that can be put to use immediately." -- --Phil Pellegrino, Vice President of Sales, Oscar Mayer Food Corporation, Madison, Wisconsin

"Unbeliebable! Three of today's literary business giants have temaed up to write an all-time best seller for business people everywhere." -- --Charles "Red" Scott, President and CEO Intermark Inc. and The Trident Group Ltd.

More About the Authors

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Customer Reviews

Great book and easy read!!!!
M. Hodgins
This easy to read book is definitely worth one's time.
Shawn White
This is a must read for all management.
DENISE

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

70 of 71 people found the following review helpful By Donald Mitchell HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on May 20, 2000
Format: Hardcover
Many people in an organization focus on managing the boss rather than doing their own job. What better way to manage the boss than to constantly seek her/his guidance on everything? Then, the boss can be flattered that you want his/her help, and will also take the blame if anything goes wrong. Insecure bosses like to be involved, so that fewer "errors" occur.
This wonderful book points out that no one can learn without making errors. Also, if you and your subordinate are doing the same job, one of you is superfluous. A common source of stalled thinking in this area is focusing on the fact that you, as manager, can do the job better and faster than you can teach the task or job to someone. What managers fail to realize is that someone closer to the source of the problem should be able to come up with a better solution. Also, the time taken to teach someone else to do the task is usually much less over a year or two than the time taken to help someone learn the task.
The key problem is that we all like to fall back on doing what we are comfortable with and are good at rather than new challenges where we are not so competent. Banish that feeling!
This book gives you lots of practical ideas for how to respond to efforts by your subordinates and colleagues to delegate their work and responsibility to you. You will learn how to see them coming and to keep the monkey where it belongs: with them.
If you find that you are pressed for time, this book is an important source of ideas to free up your life to have less stress while you and your organization both accomplish more.
Good luck with taking care of your monkey business! It's an important step toward developing an irresistible growth enterprise.
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33 of 33 people found the following review helpful By Sami Fgaier on April 5, 2000
Format: Paperback
The one minute manager's symbol, a one-minute readout from the face of a modern digital watch, is intended to remind each of us to take a minute out of our day to look into the faces of the people we manage. The monkey manger's symbol a stressed manager overwhelmed by a desk full of problems, is intended to remind us to constantly discipline ourselves to invest our time on the most vital aspects of management rather than dilute our effectiveness by "doing more efficiently those things that shouldn't be done in the first place." What follows, is a story of a manger who worked long hours and never seemed to get caught up with all the work he had to do. He learned about monkey management and how not to take initiative away from his people so they can care for and feed their own monkeys. In the process, he learned to be more effective in dealing with his own manager and the demands of his organization. The performance of his department drastically improved, as did the prospects for his career. The authors hope is that you will use what you learn in this book to make a difference in your life and the lives of the people you interact with at work and at home.
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38 of 42 people found the following review helpful By Donald Mitchell HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on February 9, 2001
Format: Paperback
This book does a great job of helping people focus on their own work.
Many people in an organization focus on managing the boss rather than doing their own job. What better way to manage the boss than to constantly seek her/his guidance on everything? Then, the boss can be flattered that you want his/her help, and will also take the blame if anything goes wrong. Insecure bosses like to be involved, so that fewer "errors" occur.
This wonderful book points out that no one can learn without making errors. Also, if you and your subordinate are doing the same job, one of you is superfluous. A common source of stalled thinking in this area is focusing on the fact that you, as manager, can do the job better and faster than you can teach the task or job to someone. What managers fail to realize is that someone closer to the source of the problem should be able to come up with a better solution. Also, the time taken to teach someone else to do the task is usually much less over a year or two than the time taken to help someone learn the task.
The key problem is that we all like to fall back on doing what we are comfortable with and are good at rather than new challenges where we are not so competent. Banish that feeling!
This book gives you lots of practical ideas for how to respond to efforts by your subordinates and colleagues to delegate their work and responsibility to you. You will learn how to see them coming and to keep the monkey where it belongs: with them.
If you find that you are pressed for time, this book is an important source of ideas to free up your life to have less stress while you and your organization both accomplish more.
Good luck with taking care of your monkey business! It's an important step toward developing an irresistible growth enterprise.
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18 of 18 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on March 24, 1999
Format: Paperback
The One Minute Manager's symbol- a one-minute readout from the face of a modern digital watch- is intended to remind each of us to take a minute out of our day to look into the faces of the people we manage. And to realize that they are our most important resources. The Monkey Manager's symbol- a harried manager overwhelmed by a deskful of problems- is intended to remind us to constantly discipline ourselves to invest our time on the most vital aspects of management rather than dilute our effectiveness by "doing more efficiently those things that shouldn't be done in the first place." What follows is a story about a harried manager who worked long, hard hours, yet never quite seemed to get caught up with all the work he had to do. He learned about monkey management and how not to take initiative away from his people so they can care for and feed their own "monkeys." In the process, he learned to be more effective in dealing with his own manager and the demands of his organization. The performance of his department drastically improved as did the prospects for his career. The authors hope is that you will use what you learn in this book to make a difference in your life and the lives of the people you interact with at work, and at home.
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