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The Moon's Fire-Eating Daughter: A Sequel to Silverlock (Prologue Books) Kindle Edition

13 customer reviews

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Length: 208 pages Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled

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Product Details

  • File Size: 1399 KB
  • Print Length: 208 pages
  • Publisher: Prologue Books (January 4, 2012)
  • Publication Date: January 4, 2012
  • Sold by: Amazon Digital Services, Inc.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00BB2GNMU
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Not Enabled
  • Lending: Not Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #557,044 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

14 of 14 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 11, 1998
Format: Paperback
If you get excited at the idea of eavesdropping on Avram Davidson and R.A. Lafferty getting drunk together and discussing literary theory, then you really ought to read this book. If you have strict standards about story, plot-line and character development, this book will probably drive you nuts. I read it because I loved Silverlock and this was the only other John Myers Myers book I could get my hands on. It doesn't have the storyline or the character development of Silverlock (or the wonderful poems and songs), but it is even thicker with literary and mythological references. There is a reference book for Silverlock, A Silverlock Companion by Fred Lerner, and there are several online reference guides for Silverlock. The Moon's Fire-Eating Daughter deserves an online reference guide too. The book is almost an incestuous literary orgy, literature feeding off of itself. One of the high points for me was a discussion among the gods and heroes over whether the rules of form in poetry are a rein on creativity or a goad.
This is a writer indulging himself. If you have a taste for the same indulgences, you may get a kick out of it.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Theo Logos on January 26, 2006
Format: Paperback
Marketed as the sequel to Myers' great underground classic, `Silverlock', `The Moon's Fire-Eating Daughter' is no such beast, although it does bear a family resemblance to that former work, as a particularly fierce house cat might to a tiger. Both books are romps through the entirety of literary history, but it is there that the similarities end. Whereas `Silverlock' was a feast of literary creations, `The Moon's Daughter' introduces us to the creators, or makers, as Myers would have it. But the most important difference between them is that while `Silverlock' functions on several levels, with a story that can stand alone as a fantasy adventure even to those who miss the most obvious of its literary, historical, and mythological references, `MF-ED' has no story worth speaking of, and if you are not amused and charmed by Myers' literary game playing, there is no reason to read it.

George Puttenham is the book's hapless hero, a bored professor of Economic Geography, who is swept out of his dull routine by the godess Venus (the fire-eating dame of the title, AKA Ininni, Ishtar, Aphrodite, Astarte, etc.), and assigned the task of making a survey of the Road - a highway that is none other than the continuum of all of literary history. On that Road, he travels from ancient Sumer to Homeric Troy, from deep in the Goof Stream of the Ocean to the star Aldbaran and the planet Mercury. Along the way, he encounters most of the great writers and poets of history, (also cut loose from their respective times), mostly in bars, and they all get blotto and sling about ribald tales.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Ken on October 28, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
It would be more accurate to describe "The Moon's Fire-Eating Daughter" as "written in the same manner as 'Silverlock'", than to claim it as a sequel. This novel also involves a mundane traveling through a land of wonder, but in this case rather than literature our hero is studying cultural history. Related, but not the same.
Most I've met who did not enjoy this book were expecting it to be an actual sequel, along the lines of "The Further Adventures of Shandon Silverlock." Don't be fooled, this is NOT that book. (Although Golias does make a brief appearance.) If you can make it past that, and you enjoyed SIlverlock, you'll probably enjoy this one, too.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By petermcl@ughlin.dnet.co.uk on August 16, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I first read this forty years ago at university. An exuberant energetic story that was not as good as Silverlock but still worth reading
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Paula Berman on October 17, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition
Worth reading, anyway; another roadtrip into the land of arts and letters, with another character who grows thereby. The framing romance is inconsequential and silly; as with Silverlock the fun is in playing "spot the reference".
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Not a true sequel to SILVERLOCK, but the Lady of the Lake does appear in both books, and there is a line about "Golias" in it.
SILVERLOCK had the reader bumping into literary characters, this book has you bumping into authors. The protagonist is on a journey to becoming a poet, and I had a rough time with about the first third of the book, but it picked up.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
The language of this book was amazing, the sense of transitioning through human history was also pretty darned cool, as was watching the characters morph from concept to concept. This is a good followup to Silverlock.
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