Customer Reviews

32
The Moons of Jupiter
Format: PaperbackChange
Price:$11.11+Free shipping with Amazon Prime
Your rating(Clear)Rate this item


There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

110 of 111 people found the following review helpful
on October 19, 2006
I won't tell you what to look for or how to feel when you read Alice Munro. If you've never encountered her before, The Moons of Jupiter is the best place to start, early Munro at the height of her evocative powers. Don't turn to the Selected Stories first. Each of Munro's books is a suite of stories, interlocking in themes and often in characters, on the model of a sonata, a suite of musical movements. The experience of reading the whole suite is more powerful than the sum of the separate stories. Perhaps the story-suite is the successor to the floundering form of the modern novel.

By the way, Munro is admittedly a woman writng about women for women to read, but I'm an outdoors guy, a baseball fan, a weight-lifter, and at least until my son was born something of a rascal, despite all of which I rank Alice Munro very high among my favorite fiction writers.
55 commentsWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
41 of 46 people found the following review helpful
In The Moons of Jupiter, Munro clearly reveals the universal perplexities of our everyday lives. The characters have a rich realness to them and must be commended for their candid honesty. The strength of this book lies in Munro's ability to create a genuine perspective in which the reader has no choice than to become emotionally connected to the characters. I enjoyed these stories because there are many "grey areas" in which the reader must rely on his own experiences to draw conclusions. There are no definative endings to these stories. They are written in such a way that there is often a fine line between hope and despondence; only the reader's morals and values can recognize one from the other.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
As usual, Ms. Munro tells these stories of small town characters of past decades with customary people and their emotions in mind. I enjoy reading about what people think and do without the crimes and warring so prevalent in much literature. These stories calm and entertain me.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on November 8, 2013
These relatively early Alice Munro stories are the best I've read and I am a real fan owning four of her last short story collections in hardback. Although in her last collection she mentions that several stories there are the most "personal," I find the the early stories in the book like "Chaddley's and the Flemings" and "Dulse" to the most emotionally involving of any of the many I've read. Highly recommend to any lovers of the well honed short story
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
on April 29, 2013
What an amazing writer! She captures the complexities, insecurities and emotional ambiguities of women's internal lives. Men seem to be more mysterious, inscrutable and mono-dimensional in these tales. The stories are artfully written. They are a pleasure to read. A great choice for book club discussions.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
on February 21, 2014
I haven't read all of Munro's books, but several of them, including her latest. They all are great. But the writing in this one, to my taste, is her best. Consider the first paragraph of the book, which includes this long, but awe-inspiring sentence: "In those days it seemed to be the thing for women's bodies to swell and ripen to a good size twenty, if they were getting anything at all out of life; then, accoding to class and aspirations, they would either sag and loosen, go wobbly as custard under pale print dresses and damp aprons, or be girded into shapes whose firm curves and proud slopes had nothing to do with sex, everything to do with rights and power." After reading that I had to just sit back and savor her remarkable artistry, let the glow settle a while before reading on. Can't recommend this one enough.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on March 17, 2014
Alice Munro can choose one action or decision and describe it so well, you can instantly recognize the character. She is all about characters. Unfortunately the stories are not only predictable but trite.
If you are interested primarily in character description, this will be a good read for you.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on December 25, 2013
The short stories of Alice Munro are quiet portrayals of small town women in mid stride sketched in pastels. In this collection there is an overarching theme of present day estrangement and seeking connections with place and past. .

In "Dulse" Lydia takes a mid life pause on an island of Nova Scotia's Bay of Fundy. A poet and an editor, she's recently been left by live in Duncan whom she self consciously refers to as "a man I used to live with" . "Connection" looks at one half of the narrator's family, through a magical summer visit of the narrator's mother's cousins to Dagliesh in Munro's Huron county remembered through the lens of cousin Iris passing through Vancouver years later on her way to Alaska; the companion piece "A Stone in the Field" recounts a trip up to her father's birthplace looking for the shack of a Mr. Black who died on the property. "Visitors" employs a similar motif where two brothers enjoy a reunion after 30 years and go looking for their old homestead near Hullet swamp, now a conservation area, but no traces remain.

Other stories I'd like to hilite as most enjoyable: The first is the story "Accident" about an affair between two school teachers in 1943 - Francis and Ted - interrupted by the accidental death of Ted's son. "Turkey Season" is a Christmas tale of sorts, about a 14 year old girl working as a turkey gutter observing the antics and complaints of the full timers. Then there is Julie's "Hard Luck Stories" of "almost affairs" which begins at the end of a librarian's convention, takes us first into a weekend designed for revenge by a socialite who wishes to show off her new lover, a poet, to an old one, then a remembrance of being pursued by the facilitator of her 70s encounter group, but it turns out she is only part of a pattern. However the gem of the collection is "Mrs. Cross and Mrs. Kidd", two friends of 80 years who meet again in a retirement home and go on living.

For me one exception is "Labor Day" where even on rereading the characters never quite gelled though the almost ending is intriguing.

A lovely read by a winter fire on Christmas Day. In a sense not much happens in each of the stories, but the language and characters are beautiful and much is revealed.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on March 5, 2015
Frankly, this collection of stories would seem to have far more appeal to women. It was sent to me by a Goodreads buddy whose female book club had used it as a selection and had been quite impressed. Typical of many collections of short stories, some end abruptly and caused a "say what?" reaction on my part (especially the tale for which the book is named) and some show women overanalyzing things to a great extent. I did enjoy "The Accident" which certainly illustrates the "connectedness" of events in our lives. So why did I rate it so highly? The quality of the writing. Truly a wordsmith at work and someone who can really drill down into the common elements of ordinary lives.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on January 22, 2014
This is a marvelous book with excellent stories. The language is excellent, very good ideas on women's life. Not only I read with great pleasure, I gave it to my sister for her birthday. Intimate and personal subjects very well developed.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Send us feedback

How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you?
Let us know here.