Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

The Morning Star: In Which the Extraordinary Correspondence of Griffin & Sabine is Illuminated Hardcover – September 1, 2003


See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$26.98 $6.98

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Hero Quick Promo
Browse in Books with Buzz and explore more details on the current pick, "Landline" by Rainbow Rowell.

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 56 pages
  • Publisher: Chronicle Books; 1st edition (September 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 081183199X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0811831994
  • Product Dimensions: 8 x 7.8 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 15.2 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (24 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #221,206 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

In this sixth and final installment in his popular Griffin & Sabine saga (divided into two trilogies), writer and illustrator Bantock creates another jewel box of a book, rife with intrigue, legend and mystery. The exquisitely designed text features the series' trademark postcards and letters, written by archeologist Matthew Sedon, his true love Isabella de Reims, and the mysterious Griffin and Sabine, who have infiltrated the young lovers' lives. Fetchingly sepia-toned and exotic, the illustrated missives are charged with equal parts passion and mythology. Although newcomers to the story may be baffled by references to events that occurred in the previous volumes, they will find much to enjoy in the lush design and seductive tale. The suspense builds as Isabella, abandoning her studies in Paris, travels by land closer and closer to Matthew in Egypt. There is a voyeuristic thrill to reading someone else's mail, and Bantock exploits it thoroughly. When Matthew and Isabella come together at last, their union is a bit too breathless (Isabella engulfs Matthew "in her creature senses"), but readers who have followed the characters this far will appreciate the fireworks.
Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From Booklist

Artist and fabulist Bantock concludes the cosmic romance of his internationally adored creations, Griffin and Sabine, and their young disciples, Matthew and Isabella, in the final installment in a series that includes The Gryphon (2001) and Alexandria (2002). Elevating his exquisite and unique form of illustrated epistolary novels (beware: as before, some letters are not bound into the book) to new heights, Bantock's art has never been finer, the sweet sensuality has never been more poetic, and the drama of their spiritual mission has never been so exalted. As Griffin and Sabine encourage the intrepid Isabella on her urgent and risky journey from France to Egypt and instruct Matthew in ways to subvert the dark force that stalks him, Bantock orchestrates a fantastic battle between good and evil. Sabine writes that Matthew and Isabella are part of "an elite of the sensitive, the considerate and the tenacious" engaged in a "struggle against cruelty and unrelenting chaos," and, at the very least, best-selling Bantock's dreamy creations do good by adding beauty to the world. Donna Seaman
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

One, Mr. Lucas should never write his own scripts - he's horrible at dialogue.
Kelly L. Planer
I have no gripes with the story, or the whole second series for that matter, up until the final two postcards.
Mike
There was no real closure, and it seemed that the ending was rushed and not really well planned out.
Haumana

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

17 of 19 people found the following review helpful By Michael Mapa on October 12, 2003
Format: Hardcover
This book (and the second trilogy, for that matter) is neither as visually arresting nor as emotionally involving as the first one. Of course, it could be that the novelty of the gimmick (reading someone else's mail) is wearing off, but I think it is also because Matthew and Isabella are simply not as interesting as Griffin and Sabine. As for the art, it's still lavish, but it lacks the sort of dream-/nightmare-like quality that made the first series so compelling. In other words, there doesn't seem to be much spirit in this series.
And unless Nick Bantock has plans of coming up with a 3rd trilogy, I'm afraid the question will linger in my mind is: "What was THAT all about?" I wish he'd stopped at The Golden Mean--at least there were so many interesting theories about the series at that point (my personal favorite is that Sabine was a malevolent force that drove Griffin to madness). But now, there are no good theories.
Hardcore fans of Bantock's art will no doubt enjoy this series. But those hoping for a story worthy of the first series may be disappointed, as I was.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
14 of 16 people found the following review helpful By wiredweird HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWER on May 17, 2004
Format: Hardcover
Frankly, I'm disappointed. The original Griffin and Sabine series had a wonderful spark of originality. This series is just too derivative.
I wanted to like this new trilogy. I like Bantock's art. There is so much in each picture that I can barely pull myself away for the text. I like the new plot elements that Bantock introduced. The cat with a name, Isabella's roar - these could have been rich new elements in the G&S mythology. They never went anywhere though, and left us re-reading the G&S story in somewhat different words.
If you're new to Bantock, the first G&S trilogy is your best bet. It's fresh, mysterious, and exciting. I just wish that this series could have deepened the mystery or sustained the excitement.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
12 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Haumana on September 27, 2004
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
As always, the artistic value is great, but what happened to the story? Although I did not find The Gryphon & Alexandria as compelling as the original trilogy, it still had a decent story line to follow.

I have to say that I was deeply disappointed with how the story concluded. There was no real closure, and it seemed that the ending was rushed and not really well planned out. I basically felt like this book was strictly to showcase the art rather than the text content. Such a sad thing.

It had the making of being something so classical and great, but fell flat on its face. I would recommend that readers stick with the original Griffin & Sabine trilogy and stop there.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
9 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Mike on July 12, 2004
Format: Hardcover
...either that or Bantock just forgot to hit the light switch. I must admit, despite the enigmatic characters, intriguing plot twists and refreshingly exotic artwork I've come to love from this series, what I was really holding my breath for with this final installment was clarification. Alas, it didn't deliver.
I have no gripes with the story, or the whole second series for that matter, up until the final two postcards. After six books and twelve years, did Bantock just write himself into a trap? Could it be that he lost direction in the end and saw no way out but to flash-cook up a conclusion in the guise of another puzzle for us to figure out? I doubt it, but I can't help feeling shortchanged. What exactly was Frolatti, and why was he so intent on keeping Griffin and Sabine subdued (wherever the heck they were)? After so much time, why was Matthew and Isabella's reunion so vague?
I love cliffhangers as much as the next person, but not when there's nothing more to look forward to. Disappointing.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
8 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Eric Stott on December 21, 2003
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This book looks beautiful, but it tells nothing, explains nothing, just leaves the story hanging aimlessly. Please Mr Bantock, give us another volume- something that will satisfy us.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Michelle Boytim on June 8, 2010
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This is the concluding volume to the second Griffin and Sabine series, and is the final book to date. Told in the same format as the previous books in the series, the artwork continues to be rich and luscious, and the letter format keeps the suspense going. You enter this book wondering if Matthew and Isabella will get together, wondering if they will be caught by Frolatti, and if they will ever meet Griffin and Sabine. Some of these questions are answered, some eluded to, and some are left hanging. We meet the cat from Griffin and Sabine who is obviously more than an ordinary cat. A diversion is planned for Frolatti that revolves around a supposed hidden artifact which gives the main characters some breathing room. While I won't go into the ending, I found it dissapointing and was hoping for more. Overall, I found this trilogy to be not as strong as the prior trilogy. The first set may have set my expectations too high. I did purchase The Venetian's Wife and will see what else Bantock can do.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Sergio on May 3, 2010
Format: Hardcover
Curious - this trilogy (a sequel to the Griffin & Sabine trilogy) was in many ways a more exciting story than the first. And the format and artwork was comparable, but somehow, this final volume in the second trilogy did not seem to have the overall impact. This seems solely due to the amount of information Bantock hints at without ever revealing. If you're used to your novels ending in a nice tidy package, this isn't it. However, the overall storyline, the presentation, and the artwork are enough to encourage me to re-read the first trilogy (which I don't recall as well as I should) and then re-read the second, taking a bit more time and dwelling on the hints and symbols. In doing so, one may get a better idea of what exactly happened.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search