The Motley Fool Investment Guide and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $15.99
  • Save: $4.23 (26%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 11 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Eligible for Amazon's FREE Super Saver/Prime Shipping, 24/7 Customer Service, and package tracking. 100% Satisfaction Guarantee.
Add to Cart
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

The Motley Fool Investment Guide: How The Fool Beats Wall Street's Wise Men And How You Can Too Paperback – January 2, 2001


See all 19 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$11.76
$2.12 $0.01

Frequently Bought Together

The Motley Fool Investment Guide: How The Fool Beats Wall Street's Wise Men And How You Can Too + The Motley Fool Investment Workbook (Motley Fool Books) + The Motley Fool Million Dollar Portfolio: How to Build and Grow a Panic-Proof Investment Portfolio
Price for all three: $33.84

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Product Details

  • Series: Motley Fool (Book 10)
  • Paperback: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Touchstone; Rev Exp edition (January 2, 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0743201736
  • ISBN-13: 978-1402871818
  • Product Dimensions: 8.4 x 5.4 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 11.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (121 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #457,089 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

"Thanks to online communication," say David and Thomas Gardner, founders of the Motley Fool investment Web site, "it is now little-guy investors, not huge-guy brokerage firms, who hold the most valuable cards." The Gardners, narrating their own Guide, lay out their Foolish market-beating techniques like the college economics instructors you wish you'd had. They explain, in everyday language (and with just the right touch of sarcasm), exactly why some people do better than others when they invest their money. Most important, they tell how you can be one of the few who do better. (Running time: 1.5 hours, one cassette) --Lou Schuler --This text refers to the Audio Cassette edition.

From Publishers Weekly

This update of the Motley Fool's first book offers the same smart-aleck advice found on the Gardners' popular Web site and in their other books: "Dear Fool, you must ask yourself: Are this company's products likely to fulfill needs in the future even better than they did in the past?... Does management have the vision?... These are extremely difficult questions to answer. But to the best of your ability, you'll want to answer 'em." Their useful tips on researching stocks, avoiding scams and tuning out the Internet din will best be appreciated by those new to the series. (Jan.)
Copyright 2000 Reed Business Information, Inc.

More About the Authors

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

The part that I like the most was when authors explained why mutual funds underperform the general market.
Mariusz Skonieczny
Aside from these criticisms, however, I recommend this book as a very good primer on how to evaluate a company you are thinking about investing in.
Ruth Henriquez Lyon
Great for people who don't want to do a lot of work and have time to do this; not great if you want to make money faster though.
MISTER SJEM

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

81 of 83 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on September 26, 2000
Format: Hardcover
MFIG was a great book at the time, but Father Time has not smiled on the book or the strategies contained within. In short: if you a market novice looking for a good intro book, look elsewhere.
These are the sections of the book:
1. Mutual funds. They point out that most funds actually do worse than the market averages, and you would do better to invest in the average itself - an index fund. This is good, solid advice, but nothing too revolutionary nowadays.
2. The Dow Dividend Strategy, aka the Foolish Four. Unfortunately, this strategy has been all but shot down - it has done very poorly recently. Even the creator of the original Dogs of the Dow strategy has disowned it, and the Fool doesn't pay much attention to it anymore. Time to move on.
3. Small cap growth stocks. The Fool has abandoned this in favor of newer strategies.
4. Shorting stocks. The Fool doesn't do this anymore, and it is much too risky to be talking about in a beginners book anyway, because you can lose more money - potentially much more - than you invested.
If you want to learn the basics of finances, try Jane Bryant Quinn. If you want to learn to invest in stocks, try O'Neil's "How to Make Money in Stocks", or some of the Fool's newer books.
This is not to book to get anymore.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
60 of 62 people found the following review helpful By Ruth Henriquez Lyon VINE VOICE on February 23, 2000
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This was the first book I read on picking stocks, and I still refer to it occasionally. It contains some very good information on how to evaluate companies. Some of this information has since been updated on the Motley Fool website, and continues to be. That's one thing I like about their outlook: they are willing to change their approach as they continue to learn. On the downside, I find that they completely rule out some very worthwhile aspects of investing as being worthless. For instance, they have a section in the back of the book which practically compares technical analysis (chart reading) to snake oil. Although I personally would not pick a stock only on the basis of its chart, I must allow that charts help us pick good entry and exit points, and provide other pertinent information as well. One of my favorite investment authors, John Murphy, has an entire book on technical analysis. I regard him as a scholar and a very astute thinker who would never dabble in snake oil.....with resources like Murphy's books out there I can't understand TMF's cavalier dismissal of the entire field. They similarly denigrate the entire field of options and futures, which I think perhaps shows a lack of understanding on their part. Aside from these criticisms, however, I recommend this book as a very good primer on how to evaluate a company you are thinking about investing in.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
27 of 27 people found the following review helpful By "lovelycj" on December 6, 1999
Format: Paperback
I highly recommend this book for people interested in investing but are not sure where to begin. It gives you the basics of getting started and the motivation to handle your own money. The Gardner's gives a little more attention to the "younger generation" and therefore makes reading comprehensive and entertaining. A Must Buy, for new investors.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
49 of 54 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on January 17, 2000
Format: Paperback
-- People who *should* read this book: 1) Beginning Investors. 2) Conservative Investors. 3) People without the time to manage their investments, and who are willing accept smaller returns.
-- People who *should not* read this book: 1) Experienced investors. 2) Short term investors. 3) Day traders.
In short, this book is a good intro. to investing for beginners and has a long-term, conservative slant. The first part of the book is easy reading, but it gets a little drier toward the end.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
38 of 43 people found the following review helpful By "readerordinaire" on December 22, 1999
Format: Paperback
The rating of four stars is primarily due to the edifying experience of digesting pages 71-180; though that text was worthy of five stars, it was necessary to penalize the fools for making me read through the rest of the very bland book, albeit in front the television. In "the rest of the book", the fools first take 70 pages to tell us that they have a strategy, which is like telling you to close your eyes and then boring you with self-congratulatory blather. Then, they yarble on and on from page 180 to the end discussing the kind of things they like to ignore. Who cares? The foolish striving to thicken the width of the book spine reminded me of page requirements that we all had to fulfil writing papers in high school.
Despite the odds, the book remains worthwhile. The excerpted section is a comprehensible, lively introduction to investing in the market. The fools' best skill is presenting their original and borrowed (Peter Lynch is a key figure) mathematical formulas and then massaging them to allow for human judgments based on interpreting financials and income statements (which they cover in palatable form). It is tempting to see this strategy (precise formula plus the leeway for human reevaluation) as covering one's bacon, the customary allowance for errors, namely the ones that the reader may make. But the pure numbers and their comparisons marking differences and similarities are brought to life, coursing through a company body. By the time you finish the book, you will know more than your fellow puffers.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
58 of 68 people found the following review helpful By Donald Mitchell HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on April 30, 2000
Format: Paperback
THE MOTLEY FOOL INVESTMENT GUIDE is a rare creature: A book full of valuable wisdom and ridiculous conjecture at the very same time. Pay attention to the former and you will be better off, and you face major risks with the latter.
As long as the book focuses on long-term research and trends, it is on solid ground. But the authors are quick to move into conjecture, based on no proof. That is where you are in danger with this book.
The section on short-selling is particularly naive. It makes it sound like you can always cover a short with only a 20 percent loss. Not!
The small cap investing advice is good up to a point. The authors totally ignore research that shows vastly better returns from small-cap growth stock investing at times when small-cap growth stocks are cheapest relative to the p/e ratios of the large cap stocks.
On the dividend-based Dow investing, the authors miss the most important point. Each of the techniques for buying "the dogs of the Dow" has quickly become obsolete in the past. Back testing provides great historical returns, and lousy future returns in this area.
On the most important point, how to use on-line investing to be more successful, the book is almost totally silent.
This book gives the impression to me of being written by inexperienced people who do not have the background to understand what they are thinking about. Through the index fund discussion, though, this is an outstanding and accurate book. It just dives off the deep end without enough swimming lessons in the other areas.
In an overpriced market like the current one, following the Motley Fool theories could make a fool out of you. If you want to try this Motley Fool approach, my advice would be to limit yourself to 10% of your stock investing.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search