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The Movement Toward a New America: The Beginnings of a Long Revolution (A Collage) - A What? Paperback – 1970

4.7 out of 5 stars 3 customer reviews

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 768 pages
  • Publisher: Alfred A. Knopf / Pilgrim Press; 1st edition (1970)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0394709446
  • ISBN-13: 978-0394709444
  • Product Dimensions: 10.8 x 8.9 x 1.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 3.8 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,461,565 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I first came across this book in a library in DC in the mid 1990's. I was fascinated with it. Being born in 1962, the hippie movement flourished when I was a child, and it is just a blur to me. This book is like going back in time. It is not a novel. Not a story. It is what it says on the cover, a collage. A collection of articles, pictures, editorials and such spanning the entire sixties (the book was published in 1970). The man responsible for this, Mitchell Goodman, (1923-1997) was an American writer, teacher, and activist. He is best known for his role in the Vietnam draft resistance movement, which drew the high profile 1968 federal prosecution of the "Boston Five." If you are a socialiologist or just interested in the 1960's and what was going on in the United States, buy this book.It's really groovy, man!
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
a wonderful artifact. underground newspapers!
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Format: Paperback
I purchased this book in 1970 during the height of the anti-Vietnam-war protest era. Over the years, it's turned out to be a perfect documentary of the practical results of the misguided theories of the American left of that era. Amusingly, nothing much has changed in forty years. The Occupy Wall Street protesters of today are spouting the same failed theories and demonstrating the same personal-hygiene habits as the hippies did back in the day. I give the philosophy espoused by this book a "1", but the documentation a "5". Overall, I give it a "4". If you want to understand the sixties counterculture, this is your book.
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