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The Moves Make the Man Mass Market Paperback – May 6, 2003


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Product Details

  • Age Range: 8 - 12 years
  • Grade Level: 8 and up
  • Mass Market Paperback: 256 pages
  • Publisher: HarperTeen; Reprint edition (May 6, 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0064470229
  • ISBN-13: 978-0064470223
  • Product Dimensions: 0.8 x 4.2 x 7.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (51 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #392,471 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Bruce Brooks was born in Virginia and began writing fiction at age ten. He graduated from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 1972 and from the University Of Iowa Writer's Workshop in 1980. He has worked as a newspaper reporter, a magazine writer, newsletter editor, movie critic, teacher and lecturer.

Bruce Brooks has twice received the Newbery Honor, first in 1985 for Moves Make the Man, and again in 1992 for What Hearts. He is also the author of Everywhere, Midnight Hour Encores, Asylum for Nightface, Vanishing, and Throwing Smoke. He lives in Brooklyn, NY.


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Customer Reviews

You need to read the book to know anything about it.
computer pro
Jerome Foxworthy and Bix River become best friends when Jerome teaches Bix how to play basketball.
Mauricio Rojas
My critique is on the book called The Moves Make the Man by Bruce Brooks.
A Reader

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

13 of 13 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on August 23, 1998
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I first read this book when I was about eleven years old. I read it about seven more times in the next year or so. I am nineteen now, but I ran across it the other day and read it again. To my surprise, it still offered everything it did when I was younger. Jerome and Bix are excellent characters, very realistic, and the story builds nicely to the unexpected ending. The real treat for me was that I hadn't read the book in so long, the ending was a surprise to me all over again. I definitely think this book is worthwhile for readers of all ages.
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14 of 16 people found the following review helpful By D. McDiffett on April 28, 2002
Format: Paperback
This is a wonderful, thought-provoking story that my 7th graders have enjoyed very much. The relationship between Jerome and Bix is well-drawn and intriguing. The racist language has not been a problem, but the profanity has caused a little concern with some parents. That said, my personal problem with the book--and one that caused some confusion with my students--is the lack of quotation marks to indicate dialogue. The better readers pick up the flow of speech easily, but the slower ones get quite confused at times. I suppose the idea is to recreate the writing style of a young boy, but I tend to see it as somehow saying, "Look at my style--I'm writing like a young boy." Otherwise, certainly a book for basketball fans to enjoy.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 8, 2000
Format: Paperback
In this book, I met Jerome Foxworthy-he's a seventh grade African American boy with a love for basketball, the French language, and his family. I also met Braxton Rivers the 3rd, a non-lying caucasian boy, and I adopted his nickname for myself-Bix. Now, me being a scruffy loud-mouthed basketball fan, I don't cry too much. But when I finished this book-for the 5th time, no less-I was blubbering like a baby. Bruce Brooks is a wonderful author who tells stories that are technically fiction, but that would not be unlikely to happen. I highly recommend this book.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By tsuchida, kayo on March 13, 2001
Format: Paperback
This book is talking about great friendship between a young black guy and a white guy. They both are really good at sports, especially, Jerome, who is the only black student at his junior high school, is an excellent basketball player and smart. Jerome is also the narrator of this book and trying to explain what's happened between him and Bix before he left from Jerome. Jerome was trying to teach Bix how to play basketball and make moves, it means fake, which is the most exciting thing of playing, but Bix'd never tried to learn how to do those things. He insisted that he'd never tried them when played any sports and won't. He thought they are lie, not real. What's going to be happened between them???? One reason I chose this book is because I'm in love with playing basketball even though I'm a girl from Japan. It's fun to imagine how Jerome was playing basketball at street in North Carolina. Besides, it's exciting to realize how relate between "The moves" of basketball and real life through the change of Bix's attitude after he used "The moves" in the game which is between Bix and his stepfather. This book tells not only how basketball is a fascinating sport but also how friends are precious through basketball. If you like basketball, this book is for you.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Kian on May 10, 2005
Format: Paperback
This is a story about two young men who come from two different backgrounds and places. In an unexpected meeting in home economics class they form a bond that can't be broken. Jerome, a young African American, who loves playing basketball and knows all the right, moves on the court. Bix, a white boy, from the other another part of town is an ace at baseball, but is suffering from severe psychological issues. Although, Jerome loves playing basketball by him-self, he cannot help how much affection he has towards Bix. So, Jerome decides to teach Bix the moves of basketball, but Bix is not willing to learn them. Together, they will teach each other the meaning of the moves both inside and outside of the court.

This Newberry winner is a book with many different layers in the story. At first glance, this book strikes you as a story about a young man who loves basketball. But this story is much more intricate than just that. The two main characters, Jerome and Bix, are very interesting and keep my attention. Jerome, and African American raised by a mother and two brothers, is a very bright, intelligent youth. Bix, a white boy from the white part of town is a very disturbed young man raised by his mother, who is in an institution and a secretive stepfather. Honestly, I thought that the author is too descriptive in the basketball scenes. But, since the book is about the "moves" it stopped bothering me midway through.

The friendship between Jerome and Bix is the main element in this story. Even though they are different races, they do not question it. It seems as though the communities have the racial problems and not the individuals. In a chapter where Bix takes Jerome to see his mother, they stop at a gas station.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By dpark3 on May 16, 2005
Format: Paperback
This book is a great book for basketball fans and readers who just want a solid book to read. It's a story about the friendship of two very different boys, Jerome Foxworthy and Bix Rivers. Jerome is a black kid who befriends Bix who is white. Together, they overcome obstacles like being the only boys in a home economics class. A major conflict in this book is between Bix and his stepfather. Bix wants to see his mentally ill mother in the hospital, but his stepfather won't let him. The reason she is in the hospital is more or less Bix's fault. One night, she woke Bix up and asked him if he loved her. Bix was all scared because she was naked and was holding a knife so he said no. Then, she went crazy and stabbed herself in the arm, and has been in the hospital ever since. Bix hates lying and he thinks that basketball is a game full of lies and deceit. But Jerome offers to teach Bix basketball to overcome his fear of lying and organizes a basketball game between Bix and his stepfather for the right to go to the hospital. If Bix wins, he gets to go see his mother in the hospital, but if his stepfather wins, Bix can't go to the hospital. The game gets started and the stepdad is crushing Bix. The only way Bix has a chance is to use fakes to get his stepfather off balance. The one problem is that Bix can't use them because of his fear of lying and deceiving. Will Bix be able to overcome his fear? Or will his stepfather be victorious? Find out in this book full of the highs and lows of friendship and family.
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