The Mozart Effect and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $14.99
  • Save: $2.51 (17%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Condition: Used: Acceptable
Comment: This book has already been well loved by someone else and that love shows. It MIGHT have highlighting, underlining, be missing a dust jacket, or SLIGHT water damage, but over-all itâ€TMs still a good book at a great price! (if it is supposed to contain a CD or access code, that may be missing)
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

The Mozart Effect: Tapping the Power of Music to Heal the Body, Strengthen the Mind, and Unlock the Creative Spirit Paperback – September 18, 2001


See all 13 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$12.48
$3.39 $0.01

Best Books of the Year
See the Best Books of 2014
Looking for something great to read? Browse our editors' picks for 2014's Best Books of the Year in fiction, nonfiction, mysteries, children's books, and much more.


Frequently Bought Together

The Mozart Effect: Tapping the Power of Music to Heal the Body, Strengthen the Mind, and Unlock the Creative Spirit + Music For The Mozart Effect, Volume 1, Strengthen the Mind + Music For The Mozart Effect, Volume 2, Heal the Body
Price for all three: $40.86

Buy the selected items together
If you buy a new print edition of this book (or purchased one in the past), you can buy the Kindle edition for only $2.99 (Save 69%). Print edition purchase must be sold by Amazon. Learn more.


Best Books of the Year
Best Books of 2014
Looking for something great to read? Browse our editors' picks for 2014's Best Books of the Year in fiction, nonfiction, mysteries, children's books, and much more.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 334 pages
  • Publisher: Quill; Reprint edition (September 18, 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0060937203
  • ISBN-13: 978-0060937201
  • Product Dimensions: 5.3 x 0.8 x 8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (39 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #500,994 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

With a subtitle of Tapping the Power of Music to Heal the Body, Strengthen the Mind, and Unlock the Creative Spirit, the casual reader might jokingly ask if the book could also improve chances for world peace, bring free and open elections to third world countries, and give your wash whiter whites and brighter brights. Don Campbell's premise is, however, reasonably straightforward: he asserts that the kind of noise to which one is exposed can have important effects on mental and bodily health. As a trial, try protecting your hearing for a few days from the continuous barrage of noise in a typical urban environment; it really does seem to improve one's attitude and fatigue levels.

Where Campbell's ideas become more provocative is in the realm of music. Supported by much anecdotal evidence, he proposes that Classical music with a big "C" (the music of Mozart's period) can reach out to those who are mentally isolated from their fellows, like the autistic, and can help infants react and think better. (Will prenatal music classes be the next big trend for yuppie babies?) In addition, the music of Mozart contributes to the improved functioning of the higher cerebellar functions, including the ability to deal with logical and mathematical concepts, while contemporary rock actually decreases mental acuity. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Review

Don Campbell is the dean of sound healers. His work is of inestimable value. Practical, mystical and visionary, he makes the world of music accessible, friendly and profoundly healing. Julia Cameron Intelligent, informed, and practical, Don is an excellent guide to the wide-ranging power of music to inspire, educate, and heal. The Mozart Effect could add a universe to the world you've been living in. Thomas Moore Campbell reveals how music is one of the most transformative forces in human experience - how it literally has life-and-death potency. Read this book. You may never hear music the same way again. Larry Dossey Don Campbell has written a fascinating and informative book - a tuning fork for our times. Clarissa Pinkola Estes --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

In other words, not a convincing thesis.
tertius3
Having read the book, I took his music for healing to her hospital ICU and instructed the nurses to keep the music on at all times.
Carol Cannon
Like most things outside the box, this one is best field-tested on your own.
Charlie Canning

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

107 of 114 people found the following review helpful By Bradley P. Lehman on November 4, 2002
Format: Hardcover
I enjoyed reading this: it has sparked my imagination about the uses of music (my own doctoral degree is in musical performance). I like books of anecdotes, like this one, as light reading. Campbell introduces the field of music therapy in plain and simple language. I read about half of this while attending a family member in the hospital, and read the rest of it in odd moments before and after that. It gave me a few ideas about how to bring in music that could help the healing.
But the "science" in this book is a mess (as other reviewers here have pointed out), and the musical references are even worse. There are so many errors of fact when Campbell refers to classical compositions and composers, it gave me serious doubt whether *any* of this book is actually well researched. Titles, dates, spelling, descriptions of the music...easily verifiable facts that are laugably wrong (for example, the author asserts that Ravel's "Bolero" accelerates). A competent editor should have caught those errors, and an author who really knows the field of classical music wouldn't have written them in the first place.
The author is content to pull together material from everywhere, without synthesizing it into a coherent argument. That's the strength and the weakness here. This book is fluff, merely a popularized introduction to a field. Don't expect to find convincing scientific reasoning here, or to learn much about music. Just take the music-therapy anecdotes for what they're worth: occasional success stories where people's lives have been turned around by music.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
37 of 41 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 16, 1998
Format: Hardcover
Don Cambell writes in a personal, engaging style, making the readers enjoy pursuing the premises which he purports to explore. Ranging in style from personal anecdotes to hard scientific evindence from peer-reviewed journals, Campbell attempts to build a case for the ability of music to heal a wide range of mental and physical ills.
Unfortunately, the evidence simply is not there on a scientific level. Though there are an impressive number of success stories in the book, the actual, citable research is scarce, especially for effects of music on physical health. Most of the replicable research to date concerns itself with effects mediated though stress reduction pathways: heart rate, blood pressure, and the like. When one looks for evidence of music altering immune function and disease course, the evidence becomes almost nonexistent.
Campbell seems to treat almost all forms of evidence as equal; from anecdotes to articles in the popular press, to scientific ! ! studies. A more stringent review of these pieces of evidence would be of greater service to the reader, if more difficult to get through. This is especially the case in the last segment of the book, which reads like a "laundry list" of disorders ranging from cancer to international aggression (!), but is generaly one "success story" after another, with little evidence and no critical review of how general these phenomena are.
Many other books in press today fall into similar traps. In defense of Mr. Campbell, it should be pointed out that when he writes of "healing," he does not generally mean "improvement in physical integrity." Rather, he appears to be more concerned with emotional/spiritual well-being.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
24 of 28 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on May 14, 2000
Format: Hardcover
This book is basically an advertisement for the author's line of CDs and cassettes. The author is highly biased towards an obscure 1993 study (which the author did not participate in) that seems to undoubtedly show that listening to Mozart for 10 minutes before a spatial/temporal test increased relative IQ by 9 points. Since then the term "mozart effect" has been trademarked but no government or university researcher has been able to duplicate the effect. One analysis of the results of 700 students showed a very slight (2 points) improvement in those who listened to the music, but it was deemed statistically insignificant. These research results were conveniently left out of the book. Notice that the "Customers who bought this book also bought" section here on Amazon shows that there is a strong correlation between the purchase of this book and the purchase of overpriced tapes and CDs from Don Campbell. That's the marketing tail wagging the dog. Before buying this book, search the Internet for "mozart effect" and find out the truth for yourself. Don't bother with this self-hyped panacea.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
35 of 43 people found the following review helpful By Arianna on March 11, 2004
Format: Paperback
There is no scientific basis for the "Mozart effect," none at all. The experiment in question was conducted on adults, not babies. The results of that experiment implied that the subjects actively listening to music immediately before taking intelligence tests performed slightly better on those tests because they were more alert than the subjects who had been day dreaming in silence.
Those seeking scientific papers thoroughly debunking this silliness will find them in "The Biological Foundations of Music," published by the New York Academy of Sciences (ISBN 1-57331-307-6), which is currently out of print, but is probably available at your local library.
"Music, the Brain and Ecstasy" by Robert Jourdain is an excellent introduction to music cognition. Howard Goodall's "Big Bangs" and Dowling and Harwood's "Music Cognition" can be purchased used and will be appreciated by advanced musicians and novices alike.
Parents wishing to introduce their children (and themselves) to music might consider purchasing "Leonard Bernstein's Young People's Concerts," which are insightful and an absolute joy to watch.
Do not buy "The Mozart Effect." It is a waste of your time and money. Instead, just order some Mozart or Brahms or Bach, sit down, and listen to it: you don't need Campbell's manipulative schlock to help you "unlock the creative spirit" within.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?