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The Mughal Throne: The Saga of India's Great Emperors Paperback – February 1, 2004


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The Mughal Throne: The Saga of India's Great Emperors + The Mughal World: India's Tainted Paradise + The Baburnama: Memoirs of Babur, Prince and Emperor (Modern Library Classics)
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 555 pages
  • Publisher: Phoenix (February 1, 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0753817586
  • ISBN-13: 978-0753817582
  • Product Dimensions: 8.4 x 5.4 x 1.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.6 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #359,333 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Booklist

This meticulously researched book that recounts late medieval Indian history--from 1526 to 1707--is part of a four-volume study that will cover the history of India from the beginning up to 1858. Chronologically, this is the third volume, although it is the first to be published. The author describes in detail two of the many battles the Mughals fought and depicts the everyday life of the six rulers and the people, saying that his objective is "to portray life rather than merely to chronicle history." Eraly discusses the camp followers, civilians fleeing the approaching armies, and soldiers suffering from thirst and hunger as they cross deserts and snowbound mountain passes. He tells of elephants and beautiful women exchanged as spoils of war and recounts the rulers' taste in clothes, perfume, liquor, wine, tobacco, opium, and concubines. This account of the Mughal conquest of India is essential in understanding that period of history. George Cohen
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved

Review

“Highly accessible history, full of illuminating asides.” -- Kirkus Reviews

“This account of the Mughal conquest of India is essential in understanding that period of history.” -- Booklist

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Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
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Anyone who likes history will enjoy this book.
Mr. C. A. Lachman
Abraham Eraly is a first-rate historian; he sets out his view of the historian's task in the erudite but readable "Preface" to the book.
Nancy Ann Nayar
Babur was succeded by his son Humayun, who has to be one of the most unlucky rulers of the 16th century.
M. A Newman

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

18 of 19 people found the following review helpful By M. A Newman VINE VOICE on May 18, 2007
Format: Paperback
This is a fascinating book involving a fascintating period in the history of India. During the heyday of Mughal rule, India was one of the world's leading civilizations. Here was an elite that ruled intelligently (at least at first), allowing Moslem and Hindu worship freely and equally and producing some of the great monuments of civilization, the Taj Mahal, the Red Fort, and the city constructed by one of the emperors, Akbar, Fatehpur Sikri.

The focus of the book is the emperors themselves. It begins with Babur, who came out of Central Asia, a descendent of Tamerlane, who established the dynasty in North India. Babur also wrote an autobiography which detailed the principle events of his life which makes fascinating reading even today (Modern Library has recently reissued it in paperback).

Babur was succeded by his son Humayun, who has to be one of the most unlucky rulers of the 16th century. There was the usual strife between him and his siblings (which became the standard way of doing business as time progressed) which undermined the stability of the throne. Humayan spent a lengthy period in Persia which had longstanding cultural implications for the Mughals.

Fortunately for the dynasty,during its exile Sher Khan, whose 5 year rule allowed for certain administrative reforms that allowed the restored Mughal dynasty a certain degree of financial independence and the resources to build the great monuments and to extend its control from the north of India down to south. Many historians have downplayed Sher Khan's legacy, but Eraly is quite thorough in addressing this point.

Humayan died of a freak accident while pursuing his hobby of astonomy.
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14 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Richard Wells on May 6, 2005
Format: Paperback
Arguably India's Golden Age, the near two-hundred years of the Mughal Empire from Babur to Aurangzeb was a time when the richest got richer, conquered and ruled SE Asia from Kabul to Konyakumari, built cities, forts, and fabulous tombs, lived fairly short lives, wept over trivialities, warred amongst themselves, blinded, maimed, and executed family members; and, after Aurangzeb, lost it all except in name.

"The Mughal Throne: The Saga of India's Great Emperors," is the first released third volume of a four part history of India, and though it is far from the definitive work on the Mughals it is a well written, and exciting saga - just what the title says it would be - a narrative that hits all the high points, and delves into just enough detail not to loose the casual historian or India-phile.

If you want to know India, especially Northern India, you must know the Mughals, and they're a family worth knowing. (If you like the Medici's, you'll love the Mughals.) Their reign was short in the scheme of Indian history, but stamped the country for all time.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By "puddlewonderful" on April 11, 2004
Format: Hardcover
This is an excellent book for anyone who is interested in the events in India just before the British came a'colonizing.
It is an excellent mixture of vivid story telling and clear factual progression. Eraly does more than simply recount dates and facts; he makes the people who moved these events come alive like the characters in a good novel.
I hadn't read any histories of India before this one, and I found it very easy to jump in and follow what was going on.
I believe this book is pretty much the same as Emperors of the Peacock Throne, just with a different title, so if this one remains unavailable Peacock Throne would be a good option.
Enjoy!
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Nancy Ann Nayar on October 30, 2006
Format: Paperback
The Mughal Throne is a well-researched, highly readable, extremely informative and detailed account of the great Mughal emperors from Babur through Aurangzeb. Abraham Eraly is a first-rate historian; he sets out his view of the historian's task in the erudite but readable "Preface" to the book. But not only is Eraly a first-rate historian - he is a first-rate storyteller, as well. Even the sections on military history (which I normally avoid) are written in a detailed but fascinating manner. I particularly like the way in which the various emperors' unique personalities come alive for the reader. The Mughal Throne is as engrossing and lively as any of the several historical novels set in Mughal times that I have recently read. I highly recommend this book not only for those interested in Islamic or Indian history, but for any tourist planning to visit Delhi, Agra, and/or Lahore. The many Mughal historical monuments in these cities will be enlivened for them because of their having read this excellent book.
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11 of 15 people found the following review helpful By ihsod on August 1, 2005
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is a very informative book, but I feel like it's a bit too long. I also felt like there was a huge emphasis on wars, but I wished there was more information about the culture of Mughal India, especially the lives of women. There were also references to some political figures (not the emperors) without a full description of who these people were. Without a background knowledge of Mughal history, it's hard to figure out who these people are. Despite these negative points, the history of Mughal India is presented in great detail so I'm glad I purchased the book because I learned a lot.
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