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The Multi-Site Church Revolution: Being One Church in Many Locations (Leadership Network Innovation Series) Paperback


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The Multi-Site Church Revolution: Being One Church in Many Locations (Leadership Network Innovation Series) + A Multi-Site Church Roadtrip: Exploring the New Normal (Leadership Network Innovation Series) + Multi-Site Churches: Guidance for the Movement's Next Generation
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Product Details

  • Series: Leadership Network Innovation Series
  • Paperback: 224 pages
  • Publisher: Zondervan; annotated edition edition (May 23, 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0310270154
  • ISBN-13: 978-0310270157
  • Product Dimensions: 7.9 x 5.3 x 0.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (20 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #62,775 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Geoff Surratt is on staff of Seacoast Church, a successful and high-visibility multi-site church. Geoff has twenty-four years of ministry experience in churches. Along with his wife and two children, he lives in Charleston, South Carolina. He is coauthor of The Multi-Site Church Revolution and author of Ten Stupid Things That Keep Churches from Growing.

Greg Ligon serves as Vice President and Director of Multi-Site Church Leadership Communities for Leadership Network, which involves location visits to over fifty multi-site churches. A capable writer, he also coauthored The Multi-site Church Revolution and is Leadership Network's Publisher. He and his wife have two children and live in Dallas, Texas.

Warren Bird (PhD, Fordham University) serves as a primary researcher and writer for Leadership Network and has more than ten years of church staff and of seminary teaching experience. He has collaboratively written twenty books, all on subjects of church health or church innovation. Warren and his wife live just outside of New York City. SPANISH BIO: Warren Bird, pastor ordenado por mas de veinte anos, obtuvo un doctorado en sociologia de religion en la Universidad Fordham y ademas maestrias de la Facultad Wheaton y el Seminario Teologico Alliance. Sirve como director del departamento de capital de investigacion e intelecto en la Red de Liderazgo y tiene mas de diez anos de experiencia ensenando en seminarios. Ha colaborado como autor en varios libros acerca de la salud e innovacion de la iglesia entre ellos, La iglesia emocionalmente sana. Warren y su esposa, Michelle, residen en las afueras de Nueva York.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

You Say You Want a Revolution? Meet several highly successful multi-site churches These men who have turned the world upside down have come here also. --- ACTS 17:6 ESV It is coming . . . a movement of God. Some even call it a revolution. On Sunday morning at Seacoast Church, where I (Geoff) serve on staff in Charleston, South Carolina, a band launches into a hard-driving worship chorus as lyrics and background images are projected on screens and television monitors throughout the auditorium. Everyone begins to sing along with the worship team. This describes the experience at many contemporary churches, except that this scene happens eighteen times each weekend in nine locations around the state, all of which are known as Seacoast Church. Using many different bands and worship leaders, Seacoast's eighteen nearly identical weekend ser vices represent the look of a church that chose not to fight city hall in order to construct a bigger building. We instead continued to reach new people by developing additional campuses. At another church across the country, a congregation just north of San Diego sings 'How Great Thou Art' in Traditions, one of six venues on the same church campus. North Coast Church in Vista, California, developed six different worship atmospheres, all within a few feet of each other. Traditions is more intimate and nostalgic, while other venues range from country gospel to a coffeehouse feel to vibrating, big subwoofer attitude. The elements unifying these six on-site venues are the message (one venue features in-person preaching, and the others use videocasts) and the weekly adult small groups, whose discussion questions center on the sermon that everyone heard, no matter which venue they attended. North Coast has now developed multiple venues on additional campuses, so that on a typical weekend in early 2006, worshipers chose between more than twenty different ser vices spread across five campuses. Over in Texas, Ed Young Jr., senior pastor of Fellowship Church in Grapevine, preaches every Sunday morning on four campuses --- Grapevine, Uptown Dallas, Plano, and Alliance --- all at the same time. Ed delivers his Saturday night message in person in the main sanctuary on the Grapevine campus. It is videotaped and viewed the following morning by congregations at the other venues via LCD projectors and giant projection screens, framed by live music and a campus pastor. 'We decided we could reach more people and save a huge amount of money by going to where the people are and doing smaller venues instead of building a larger worship center in Grapevine,' Ed says. In downtown Chicago at New Life Bridgeport, a small church meets in a century-old former United Church of Christ facility. The pastor, Luke Dudenhoffer, preaches a sermon that he's worked on with up to ten other pastors across the city. Each pastor leads a satellite congregation of New Life Community Church, which is known as one church in many locations. At Community Chris tian Church in Chicagoland, eight different drama teams perform the same sketch at eight different locations. Then up to three different teachers deliver a message they've developed collaboratively. Most ser vices have an in-person preacher, though some sermons are videocasts. These churches, and more than 1,500 churches like them across the country, are discovering a new model for doing church. Going beyond additional ser vice times and larger buildings, churches are expanding into multiple venues and locations, and many of them are seeing increased evangelism and even exponential growth as a result. The approach of taking one church to multiple sites seems to be the beginning of a revolution in how church is done in North America and around the world. When four university computers were linked together for the first time on something called ARPANET in the fall of 1969, there was very little press coverage of the event. Aside from the scientists working on the project, no one considered this event revolutionary; it was just an adaptation of concepts that had existed for many years. In spite of such simple beginnings, ARPANET, known today as the Internet, has revolutionized almost every aspect of our lives in the twenty-first century --- from how people get sports scores to how they buy airline tickets to how they size up a church before visiting it. Revolutions often begin with little fanfare. They are usually built on concepts that have existed for many years and are seldom recognized in the beginning as revolutionary. The measure of a revolution is its impact, not its origins. That is why we believe the multi-site church movement is revolutionary. The concept of having church in more than one location isn't new or revolutionary; the roots of multi-site go back to the church of Acts, which had to scatter due to persecution. Elmer Towns points out that the original Jerusalem church 'was one large group (celebration), and many smaller groups (cells). . . . The norm for the New Testament church included both small cell groups and larger celebration groups.'1 Likewise, Aubrey Malphurs observes that Corinth and other first-century churches were multi-site, as a number of multi-site house churches were considered to be part of one citywide church.2 The approach of taking one church to multiple sites seems to be the beginning of a revolution in how church is done in North America and around the world. The measure of a revolution is its impact, not its origins. What is a multi-site church? A multi-site church is one church meeting in multiple locations --- different rooms on the same campus, different locations in the same region, or in some instances, different cities, states, or nations. A multi-site church shares a common vision, budget, leadership, and board. What does a multi-site church look like? A multi-site church can resemble any of a wide variety of models. For some churches, having multiple sites involves only a worship ser vice at each location; for others, each location has a full range of support ministries. Some churches use videocast sermons (recorded or live); others have in-person teaching on-site. Some churches maintain a similar worship atmosphere and style at all their campuses, and others allow or invite variation. What kind of church uses the multi-site approach?

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Customer Reviews

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I whole-heartedly recommend this book!
Kent Shaffer
Geoff Surratt and team provide an amazing resource for any church considering a multi-site strategy.
Jennifer Catron
It's written for rural, suburban and/or urban churches.
M. L. Payne

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Mark C. Howell on July 4, 2006
Format: Paperback
The Multi-Site Church Revolution is the complete package! At just over 200 pages, it's packed with some really good back-story from churches where the idea is working. Equally helpful are examples of missteps in many of the model churches. Through the stories the authors effectively demonstrate that this is a strategy that is working in many different locations and in a variety of ways (Part One explores five different models).

The section that I found most helpful was on Building Better Leaders. Along with a list of 10 very practical ideas for leadership development, you'll find a list of 8 questions that will help you spot new leaders. No matter where you are on the multi-site journey, figuring out how to identify and then build more and better leaders is an ongoing challenge.

Another very helpful section is on the Secrets of Ongoing Replication. Organized around 7 thought-provoking questions, this chapter can serve as the basis for a very productive off-site for your team.

If there is a weakness, it might be in the chapter on defining your church's DNA. Hitting the Sweet Spot contains some helpful nuggets but you'll need to turn to other resources as you seek clarity on "what is foundational and what stands at the periphery."

All things considered this is a great new resource that will help advance the multi-site movement. If you're open to investigating a different solution, it could also open your eyes to new ways to advance the Kingdom. I highly recommend it.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Timothy Beavis on September 30, 2008
Format: Paperback
Honestly I was very skeptical going into this book. I picked it up because a pastors group that I am a part of were going to be discussing it together. Going into the book I had a particular picture of what a multi-site church looked like and was pleasantly suprised and even found myself enthusiastic about the concept after just the first few chapters. It is great to see the many varieties of multi-site out there and how God is working in incredible ways. A definite must read for anyone considering multi-site ministry or for anyone who wants to get a different perspective on it. Good, easy, quick read.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Tim Lubinus on August 18, 2012
Format: Paperback Amazon Verified Purchase
"The Multi-Site Church Revolution: Being One Church in Many Locations" is a very valuable book for churches that want to expand beyond their own location, are growing out of their building, or want to reach a new population of people. "A multi-site church is one church meeting in multiple locations... [it] shares a common vision, budget, leadership, and board."

One the main reasons to consider opening a multi-site church is from research that shows that the people willing to drive thirty plus minutes to a worship service rarely invite their friends and neighbors to church, participate in midweek activities and small group ministry, volunteer to serve, nor involve their children in church. A multi-site church brings the resources of a larger church closer to where people live and serve, often with an attractive smaller church atmosphere.

For churches considering opening a new campus, the authors of "Multi-site" give a history of the development of the multi-site movement and an explanation of how this approach has already been used by God to expand the ministry of hundreds of churches. After getting a vision for what multi-site churches can do, the authors give a step-by-step explanation of how to pick new sites, campus pastors, ministry teams, and budget for the new location. Then after the first campus starts, the book offers advice to help churches with staff organizational structure, leadership development, and financing that is necessary to continue and expand the multiplication of sites.

"Multi-site" is worth reading even if you are not considering starting a new campus because it will help you to understand the philosophy behind the multi-site church that probably will soon be opening near you; a high percentage of the nation's largest and fastest growing churches are multi-site. Take it a look, it is worth reading.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Shawn Wood on August 8, 2008
Format: Paperback
If you are a church leader even thinking about multi-site, are multi-site or want to know what multi-site is - you need this book. Geoff Surratt, Greg Ligon and Warren Bird have put togther a Master's Degree in multi-site in a readable and enjoyable book.
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Format: Kindle Edition Amazon Verified Purchase
Overall I think this was a very good presentation of the multi site church concept. However, it did seem largely one sided in that it primarily focused on the benefits of the multi site concept while largely ignoring the drawbacks. The author clearly is a proponent of the concept, seemingly to the degree of believing that most churches should be doing this. I would have preferred a more balanced approach. Overall, a good, informational book but not great.
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Format: Paperback Amazon Verified Purchase
Great Book. Even if you are not considering being multi-site this book is very inspiring and challenging. Especially as you discover four reasons to go multi-site. More seats, more parking, no building payments and more souls won to Christ.
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Format: Kindle Edition Amazon Verified Purchase
Very clear and useful tool to plan a multi site church. must have these in your kindle if you are planning a revolution in your city
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By Amazon Customer on December 26, 2012
Format: Paperback Amazon Verified Purchase
A very practical book looking at the trend to multi-site church campuses. It is written well and has a lot great examples of how churches are doing multi-site.
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