Buy Used
$3.96
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Good | Details
Sold by bookfinders
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Ex-library book in good condition with typical stamps and markings. Pages are clean and the binding is tight. *NOTE* Stock photo may not represent the actual book for sale.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Music Teacher Hardcover – March 1, 1997


See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$0.01 $0.01
Best%20Books%20of%202014
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Hero Quick Promo
Year-End Kindle Daily Deals
Load your library with great books for $2.99 or less each, today only. Learn more

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 208 pages
  • Publisher: Overlook Hardcover; 1st edition (March 1, 1997)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0879517565
  • ISBN-13: 978-0879517564
  • Product Dimensions: 8.3 x 5.6 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 13.4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #5,608,210 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

When pianist Bernard Winter first meets his student, Lydia, he doesn't see anything particularly extraordinary about this recently divorced woman who hopes playing piano will soften the pain of her failed marriage. Then Lydia plays for him, and beneath her amateurish technique, he detects a conviction, a joy in the music that sets her apart. Winter takes her on and soon falls in love with her. So much faith does he have in her musical ability that he decides to return to the cutthroat world of professional music in order to play with her in a joint recital at Carnegie Hall, where a terrible secret is revealed.

From Library Journal

Concepts of success and failure float through this first novel from Starer, whose autobiography (Continuo, LJ 3/1/87) detailed his life in the music world as a composer and friend of Martha Graham, among others. Here, Bernard Winter, a failed concert pianist and music teacher, is impressed by new student Lydia Harding's powerful playing and her ability to remember pieces she learned over eight years earlier. As their lessons progress, Bernard not only connects with her musically but also emotionally. Starer reveals the behind-the-scenes nature of the concert circuit?getting a manager, planning a repertoire, and booking dates?while contrasting Bernard's earlier marriage to a rising opera star with his relationship with Lydia, filled with shared enthusiasm. Despite this unexpected glimpse into the classical music world and the reader's satisfaction when Bernard finally understands the true nature of success, the book suffers from a thin plot and flat dialog. An optional purchase.?Joshua Cohen, Mid-Hudson Lib. System, Poughkeepsie, N.Y.
Copyright 1997 Reed Business Information, Inc.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

3.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
1
4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
2
1 star
0
See all 3 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on August 19, 2002
Format: Hardcover
So here we have a music teacher who is about to become a fifty something, with great skills and talents to play the piano but to whom the word "success" have many dark undertones. Firstly because he feels that the love of music does not have any need of it, and secondly out of the failure of his first marriage, largely as a consequence of his wife obssesion with it, and its willingness to ignore and set aside all persons who might interfere with such purpose.
Then, while he feels at ease with himself, and nothing new seems to occur in his life one of his new students will propel him again the the world of performances and the slavery of critics with painful consequences.
I give it five stars not because it is a great piece of literature, but the author do have the power to convey how for someone whose life is truly absorbed by music and the pleasure it provides to our soul, even when arbitrary persons and absurd emotions cloggle their everyday life, music will provide unshakable foundations to return them to their center. The dialogs are a secondary issue, because music is the only "feeling" that truly matters and it does not need success to exist.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 2 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on April 26, 2000
Format: Hardcover
The inside flap purports that a "devastating secret" is uncovered and when I finished the novel I still couldn't figure out what the horrid secret was. It was simply a story about a love affair brought together and torn apart by music. It's a quick read, but I found the dialogue to be clunky. I felt that Lydia (the student/lover)did not receive enough attention. I think there were characters in the novel that were close to her, other than Bernard (the music teacher)who could have been used more to illuminate Lydia's strange actions.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on March 26, 2002
Format: Hardcover
I give this two stars instead of one so as not to have the devastating effect an unfavorable review in the story has. Just kidding; actually I give it three stars for content, one star for execution. Yes, as several of the reviews here state, the dialogue just doesn't come off. It IS "clunky"; it IS stilted. Everything about the book seems amateurish. On the other hand, this is a first novel, and its author is professionally a musician, not a writer. You have to start somewhere. I think the real problem is that this book needed to be refashioned in collaboration with an experienced, talented editor, and nowadays money-games-playing stockholders consider editors an expense corporate publishing companies can do without. In any case, I read it in one sitting, and overall I enjoyed it.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again