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The Mysterious Universe Hardcover – Import, 1931


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 150 pages
  • Publisher: Cambridge; Reprint edition (1931)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0521054176
  • ISBN-13: 978-0521054171
  • Product Dimensions: 7.9 x 5.4 x 1.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 10.4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,666,260 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Format: Hardcover
Sir James Jeans (1877-1946) was an English physicist, astronomer and mathematician. (Bertrand Russell was fond of quoting him is his books such as Religion and Science.)

Jeans states in his Foreword, "There is a widespread conviction that the new teachings of astronomy and physical science are destined to produce an immense change in our outlook on the universe as a whole, and on our views as to the significance of human life. The question at issue is ultimately one for philosophic discussion, but before the philosophers have a right to speak, science ought first to be asked to tell all she can as to ascertained facts and provisional hypotheses. Then, and then only, may discussion legitimately pass into the realms of philosophy."

He states in the opening chapter, "Into such a universe we have stumbled, if not exactly by mistake, as least as the result of what may properly be described as an accident. The use of such a word need not imply any surprise that our earth exists, for accidents will happen, and if the universe goes on for long enough, every conceivable accident is likely to happen in time.... In the same way, millions and millions of stars wandering blindly through space for millions of millions of years are bound to meet with every sort of accident, and so are bound to produce a certain limited number of planetary systems in time."

Here are some representative quotations:

"It is always the puzzle of time that brings our thoughts to a standstill.
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