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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Critical Ground or Not?
On July 2, the Confederates launched attacks that included the Union's southern flank. The fighting around Little Round Top, the anchor of that flank, was fierce. The Union defenders included the 20th Maine led by Joshua Chamberlain. They held their line and the Conferates did not renew their attacks. As time passed, public awareness of this successful defense grew: the...
Published on September 19, 2009 by Philip Long

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5 of 9 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars An Alternate Reality
This slightly cynical, somewhat smug thesis tries to show that the key battle for Little Round Top achieved grand mythological status as time progressed but that neither the Union left and center positions, the Battle of Gettysburg itself nor the war for Union itself was really in much danger from a Confederate victory there on the rocky hill. One wonders then, why the...
Published 19 months ago by Nathan Forbes


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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Critical Ground or Not?, September 19, 2009
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This review is from: The Myth of Little Round Top: Gettysburg, Pa (Paperback)
On July 2, the Confederates launched attacks that included the Union's southern flank. The fighting around Little Round Top, the anchor of that flank, was fierce. The Union defenders included the 20th Maine led by Joshua Chamberlain. They held their line and the Conferates did not renew their attacks. As time passed, public awareness of this successful defense grew: the loss of Little Round Top would have meant defeat.

But was that true? Adelman's book is a well thought out assessment. He considers the Conferates' desire to win this ground, their ability to hold it if won, and how much damage they might have inflicted from it upon the Union line. He also traces how and why it became such an icon in the collective memory of the battle.

Agree or not, this is a great read.
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9 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The myth rings true, January 19, 2007
This review is from: The Myth of Little Round Top: Gettysburg, Pa (Paperback)
The author's approach by describing the battle, how the myth came about, and then debunking the aspects of the myth, was very effective. It would appear that had the Confederates captured Little Round Top, that they could not have done much with it. I'm convinced.
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5 of 9 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars An Alternate Reality, July 17, 2013
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Nathan Forbes (Rochester, NY USA) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Myth of Little Round Top: Gettysburg, Pa (Paperback)
This slightly cynical, somewhat smug thesis tries to show that the key battle for Little Round Top achieved grand mythological status as time progressed but that neither the Union left and center positions, the Battle of Gettysburg itself nor the war for Union itself was really in much danger from a Confederate victory there on the rocky hill. One wonders then, why the Rebs fought so hard to capture it (and nearly did, twice!) Moderately well researched, a bit uneven in its presentation, the author's conclusions amount to an alternate reality that some of the actual participants in the battle, Yank and Reb, could not see. Nor can most historians. What he regards as a steadily growing mythos is in fact the increased understanding, over time, of that key struggle and its prime importance. I say prime importance because it, along with the successful Union defense of Culp's Hill and the Cemetery Ridge section of III Corps, decided the Battle of Gettysburg, not Pickett's Charge which was always doomed to fail. (I maintain that Pickett's charge decided nothing, nothing except the final casualty count. That assault only served to alert Lee, finally, that he had lost the battle.) The author's too narrow focus ignores some critical issues like combatant psychology and the political realities of the time and treats the battle as mostly a numbers game, e.g., the greater numbers will win. He avers that if the Confederates had taken the hill they never could have kept it because they would have been vastly outnumbered by Union reinforcements. I say tell the commanders of the Army of the Potomac that the Rebs under Lee could not win a thing because they were outnumbered! Serious students of the war and of the battle may want to read this but can disregard its conclusions.
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2 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A great resource for the serious student of Gettysburg., February 22, 2013
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This review is from: The Myth of Little Round Top: Gettysburg, Pa (Paperback)
With so much being written about Gettysburg in general and Little Round Top in particular it's good to see a work that seriously examines the "what if" question. "What if" the Confederates had captured Little Round Top? Could they have held or exploited the position? Not to take anything away from the gallant men who defended the position, but the fall of Little Round Top would not have meant Southern victory in the Civil War as some have suggested. Well worth reading!
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0 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Little Round Top - Overblown rhetoric by Hollywood, January 20, 2015
This review is from: The Myth of Little Round Top: Gettysburg, Pa (Paperback)
Unfortunately Hollywood has distorted the Battle of Gettysburg into most accounts being pure fiction at its worst. Contrary to Hollywood and popular belief, General Lee did not lose the Battle of Gettysburg. Lee simply chose to retreat and fight another day. The supplies and Yankee prisoners that General Lee took from Gettysburg proves he did not loose the battle. Lee fought successfully for another year with the supplies gathered from the battle. Even the great northern General Armstrong Custer was unable to capture Lee or his troops as Lee pulled out of Gettysburg. History would be better served if the false tales of Hollywood written by Yankee revisionist historians would stay out of the history writing business.

And we can't forget the blow-hard Joshua Chamberlain, who did much to aggrandize his own participation in the battle after the war. Colonel Calvin Oates the Confederate commander on little round top tried many years to reason with Chamberlain. Each time Chamberlain chose to ignore any input from Colonel Oates in favor of his own wild tale of personal heroism and valor.

150 years later we can only speculate whether little round top is significant to the battle. One thing I can agree with the author is the story of little round top and the Battle of Gettysburg has been way overblown in Hollywood and most printed media.
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3 of 18 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Myth revealed, March 28, 2007
This review is from: The Myth of Little Round Top: Gettysburg, Pa (Paperback)
What was the Myth? Get the book. All will be revealed. A great read. Everything you wanted to know about "Little Round Top" is here. Do not miss this book.
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The Myth of Little Round Top: Gettysburg, Pa
The Myth of Little Round Top: Gettysburg, Pa by Garry E. Adelman (Paperback - May 2003)
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