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22 of 24 people found the following review helpful
If your primary concern in your kitchen is nutrition using organic and unprocessed ingredients, The Naked Foods Cookbook fits the bill very well. Written by a nutritional therapist and a chef, their emphasis is invariable obtaining the best nutritional value. The cookbook is not vegetarian or vegan though many of the recipes are. Yet the authors, Floyd and Barry, also stress flavor.||The 33-page introduction provides everything you need to know on the "naked food" principle; how food is grown, processed and prepared, your kitchen equipment and appliances ("Naked Fridge"), your pantry ("Naked Spice Rack") and cooking techniques. The recipes are good and most not hard to prepare but a good health food store in your neighborhood is essential. Even so, some ingredients will be difficult to find (young green coconut, umeboshi paste). The authors emphasize scratch cooking, making your own butter, buttermilk, mayonnaise, cream cheese, and so on. They designate each recipe as In a Rush, Everyday or Impress Your Neighbors, also whether vegan, vegetarian, pescatorian or omnivore. Unfortunately, errors slipped in here and there (wrong referred page numbers). This cookbook was inexpensively produced with occasional black-and-white illustrations. Well cross-referenced index is excellent. (As reviewed for Sacramento/San Francisco Book Review.)
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
on May 28, 2012
I purchased the kindle edition of this cookbook. I love the content, the first chapters were very informative in regards to preparing yourself and your kitchen to go naked. My only reservation thus far are the multitudes of typos in the recipes. For instance, the recipe for Quinoa says to use 1 cup quinoa and 12 cups water. I don't believe that is correct. Hopefully they will fix the typos before more people attempt the recipes.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
on May 9, 2012
I've been working at Eating Naked since January, and have lost 27 pounds (even with a few detours). I've been anxiously awaiting the new cookbook. I made the peanut butter cookie recipe last night and it was awesome! I love peanut butter cookies, and this gluten-free recipe was one of the best I've tasted. And it has the added benefit of actually providing nutrition while being a great occasional snack. Took one to my trainer and he was also SOLD!

But one of my favorite chapters is about what a Naked kitchen looks like. What is in the fridge, what is in the pantry, how to store things. Even what to cook with (not a microwave!). Trash day is next Tuesday and I'm hoping to purge another layer of non-Naked foods. It's a process, but Eating Naked is a sustainable way to eat and I'm getting better every week. Soon, I'll be soaking my raw nuts....

I never thought I'd buy sorghum or gorgonzola flour or ghee. But thanks to this cookbook, I understand what these foods are and how to use them. I am embracing the journey. Can't wait to try the marinara sauce, the chocolate chip cookie and the caesar dressing. Everything is gluten-free, which a family member requires.

Can't say enough great things about the book!
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
on May 4, 2012
I was first "met" Margaret Floyd while following a recipe trail via several food blogs: I landed on EatNakedNow the day after she posted a video clip on how to crack open a young Thai coconut. I had recently seen the white shrink-wrapped white things whilst roaming the produce section at my local New Seasons market (I was looking for fresh dates, if you must know, for a sugar-free-raw-vegan-ice-cream) and I stood in front of them for a while, wondering what the slightly unearthly things were. Call it Jungian synchronicity that I stumbled upon her wonderful site about 24 hours later.

That post was my first introduction to Margaret Floyd's writing, and two lines from that one post, since then, have stuck in my head, resonating like a kind of mantra. I found myself reciting the first one aloud the other day while stuck in traffic to one of my friends: "Those tetra packs of coconut water that are all the rage don't hold a candle to fresh coconut water straight from the source." Having consumed a lot of those tetra packs this summer to stay hydrated, now that I have switched to fresh, I keep marveling at this simple truth, expressed so eloquently. The second line I recite to myself every time I open a coconut (which is at least three times a week now): something along the lines of how opening a coconut is "no gentle act," and if she can do it-- well, I (you!) can too! Cracking open a coconut DOES take courage-- it took me about a week to work up the nerve. I credit Margaret Floyd for giving me the gentle push I needed.

I get crushes on artists (witness my obsession with Richard Brautigan in graduate school.) I haven't experienced a good food crush (yes, chefs are artists) in years (I think my last one was Nigel Slater) and I'm ashamed to admit, I've never had a food crush on a woman. But now that I have discovered, in addition to her wonderful voice, her recipes in The Naked Food Cookbook-- it is time. I'm excited.

I've been obsessed with food for the last decade or so, and like everything, it's been an evolution. About six weeks ago I started the Clean Program, and after over a month of intensive detoxing, the way I look at food has changed completely. I'm still a foodie-- obsessed with sensual, erotic, sustaining, pleasurable food . . . but with this wealth of new ingredients.

At first, I kept focusing on what I couldn't eat. The simple shift to focusing on what I COULD eat opened up a whole new world for me in regards to food: nut milks, grains like amaranth and quinoa . . .

The question at a certain point, however, is once you've learned the basics, how does one PLAY with these foods-- to make entirely new dishes AND new versions (revisions-- I'm a writing teacher) of old favorites?

Although I am not gluten intolerant, I am committed to eliminating gluten from my diet, as well as sugar. To do so means making my own milks, yoghurts, etc. from scratch. And while I am flirting with veganism (I can't give up raw honey or bee pollen!), I want to experiment with vegan baking techniques that use "real" ingredients ( (rather than synthetic egg replacements) like flax eggs (page 41).

Therefore, the two sections "Basics" and "Better than Naked" are invaluable to me. Yes, I can find all of this information on individual blogs and the internet, but the ease of having it all in one book feels like such a relief. In addition, as I've already mentioned, I love Margaret Floyd's voice-- her writing is energizing and empowering-- as enlivening as her food. Why not get it all from one source that has already proved so . . . well . . . fun?

I'm particularly excited about the recipe for vanilla hemp milk (page 53) I've been searching the last few weeks for a good recipe (synchronicity again!) And I'm eager to experiment with foods like raw coconut butter (51.) Crispy Shitake Faux Bacon(57?) Yes, please-- that and cultured vegetables (72). And I want to start making my own yoghurt (page 66).

I currently receive a bag of vegetables from a local biodynamic farm (we share the same zip code!) and I can't wait to try the Curried Swiss Chard with Almonds (page 102) and the Omega Rich Arugula Salad (page 111.)

Don't get me started on the desserts . . . but raw chocolate fudge and chocolate chip cookies . . . mmmm.

Note: I will post updates to this review as I cook with this book (it JUST came out today.)
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on July 7, 2013
I think it is good in the basics but should be more well rounded with other types of recipes in it. I do like the ability to now make my own fermented foods.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on May 3, 2012
An ever-busy lifestyle, general laziness and a lack of knowledge means that more and more people are eating out, particularly at fast-food restaurants, or reheating processed foods. At the same time health and obesity concerns are rising throughout society as a whole.

"But I am too busy", "I don't know what to do" and "I'll heat up this ready-meal at home" are commonly-heard phrases, yet many people don't realise that they can save a LOT of money, eat much healthier and prepare and cook a meal in often less time than it takes to go and fetch a takeaway meal.

Here the authors set out to teach the wary how to cook healthy, delicious and affordable meals with ease in the "comfort" of their own home. Focussing on fresh, whole, organic ingredients (thus the "naked" part of the title) that contain no additives, preservatives or fillers, the authors hope to drive home their message. There is more to these meals than a lettuce leaf, half a tomato and a bit of pasta. Recognition is given that we can be in a hurry, yet we want to eat well, particularly if we need a meal of substance to help sustain us and stop us snacking along the way which can soon put the weight on!

It must be said that one of the objectives for the authors it to help you switch to a specific lifestyle or diet-type, yet even if you are not prepared or willing to do that there is still a lot that you could gain from within this book. It does not, unlike many contemporary books, seek to educate you through nagging and claiming that this is the only way for success. A degree of practical pragmatism is also employed which is a nice touch.

Interestingly the authors do not give caloric information for their recipes as they feel that by focussing on the calorific level your attention may be shifted away from what they view are the key things to consider, namely nutrient density, freshness and quality of a meal's component parts. Of course an "somewhat arbitrary number" - as calorific figures are described - can give a guideline but it does not specifically address the quality of the fuel being put into the human machine.

Consideration is given to how an individual ingredient has been produced and the path it takes until it arrives in your kitchen. Even small things along the way can adjust the "purity" of your naked meal, such as for example whether a vegetable has been preserved with gases for a longer life. How the ingredients are handled during preparation into the final dish make a difference too. This is not a recommendation to eat everything raw and all forms of cooking are considered along with the nutritional impacts that accompany them.

Deep-frying is, however, verboten, save for the very, very special occasion!

You might need to reconsider a lot of the techniques that you have previously learned if you wish to make the most of this lifestyle, yet it is possible to test certain elements to see if it is for you, rather than taking an "all or nothing" approach. Even if you adopt the "naked food" regime for a couple of meals a week, the benefits of doing so will at least be positive rather than negative and it can lead to greater things. Rome wasn't built in a day.

The mass of recipes are relatively easy to follow (unless you don't understand "cup" measures and imperial things - nowadays there should be no excuse to having both measures in a recipe) and thought-provoking in part. Certainly it might be worthy of a little investment in time to check out something else to boot. By focussing on ingredients so much one is also tempted to try the unfamiliar.

Overall this book is quite interesting, even for a dedicated meat-eater and someone who has a slight scepticism (or is that openness?) to such matters. The book is not nannyish or pretending to know the answer to everything and its openness encourages both the die-hard enthusiast and the slightly-more sceptical alike. One good thing about this book is that you could always take advantage of the quick yet filling recipes as a in-road to possibly greater, healthier living and eating. Success by stealth?
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on January 15, 2013
The Naked Food Cookbook has a new place on go-to shelf for handy choices. Not only is the cover friendly (my counter wasn't clean) which is easy to wipe off and stain resistant -- the recipes were a great mix of things I have tried, and those I have not. It is packed with information about healthy methods of cooking and how to make your own ingredients like ghee, coconut butter, salad dressings! I'm about to clear the cookbook shelf of those that have processed foods as an ingredient and fill the empty space with ingredients for Naked Eating! Mrs. "Game Gary" / Cyndi
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on May 21, 2012
I have the Kindle version of the book and have only read a bit of the book and LOVE LOVE LOVE it. It is super user friendly and written as if being talked to by a best friend. I look forward to completing a 1st read through and adopting new ways of preparing the delicious foods nature provides. Thank you Margaret & James! (FYI: I recorded a short video testimonial but it won't upload :/)

June 2013:
I just fininshed doing the Sugar Control Detox with Margaret and James and I have learned so much from them. I used the book regularly ever since my purchase last year and use it even more now that I'm hooked on being sugar-free until I lose all my weight. It has phenominal recipes with excellent descriptions and easy to follow directions. Some recipes are super quick while others take a little more time. What I like best about he book is that it's always with me being the digital version.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on August 20, 2013
I thought this would be more of a cook book, but there is much more to it. Lots of reading and extra stuff that I wasn't really looking for.
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on September 6, 2014
Excellent Cookbook if you are wanting to make everything from "scratch" That is what me and my husband have been doing since last Sept.
It has some excellent receipts. I haven't tried all of them but quite a few and i can say of the ones I have tried, can't say I disliked any of them.
I would certainly recommend to friends and family who are interested in cooking "the old fashioned way."
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