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The Naked God (Night's Dawn Trilogy) Paperback – March 10, 2000


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Product Details

  • Series: Night's Dawn Trilogy
  • Paperback: 1184 pages
  • Publisher: Tor; New edition edition (March 10, 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0333725034
  • ISBN-13: 978-0333725030
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 6.1 x 2.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 3.3 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (72 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #5,851,465 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Peter F. Hamilton was born in Rutland in 1960 and still lives nearby. He began writing in 1987, and sold his first short story to Fear magazine in 1988. He has written many bestselling novels, including the Greg Mandel series, the Night's Dawn trilogy, the Commonwealth Saga, the Void trilogy, two short story collections and several standalone novels. Find out more about Peter F. Hamilton at www.peterfhamilton.co.uk, or discover more Pan Macmillan and Tor UK books at www.torbooks.co.uk --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

More About the Author

Peter F. Hamilton was born in Rutland in 1960, and still lives near Rutland Water. His previous novels are the Greg Mandel series and the bestselling 'Night's Dawn' trilogy: The Reality Dysfunction , The Neutronium Alchemist and The Naked God. Also published by Macmillan (and Pan) is A Second Chance at Eden, a novella and six short stories, and The Confederation Handbook, a vital guide to the 'Night's Dawn' trilogy. His most recent novels were Fallen Dragon, Misspent Youth, Pandora's Star and Judas Unchained.

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

49 of 51 people found the following review helpful By Bob Nolin on July 20, 2009
Format: Paperback
I really enjoyed two of Hamilton's recent books (Pandora's Star and Judas Unchained), so I've been planning to read his "Night's Dawn Trilogy" for a while, due to the many positive reviews here. Problem was, it was released as six books back in the Nineties, and they were out of print. Last fall, Orbit republished the series as a trilogy of massive 1300-page doorstops. I dove in eagerly, hoping for a good, long story. Two months and nearly 4000 pages later, I'm finally done. My main impression? Good, but much too long. There's at least a whole third that should have been left out; the entire Neutronium Alchemist thread has nothing to do with the rest of the story. So, right there, the trilogy could have easily lost 1000 pages or so and been a stronger tale for it. As for the remaining 3000-page story, here are my thoughts. (This review treats all three books as one long story. It can't be read any other way.)

The reading of this thing took so long, and I invested so much time in it, it was almost like a small relationship: at first, NDT seemed like a good, meaty space opera, and captured my interest. Hamilton is an excellent writer, with some faults, but he's good enough to make you overlook them. The book began as a standard sf novel, taking pains to sound authoritative and scientifically accurate. But then it suddenly veered off into Stephen King territory, which totally threw me. I had bought all three volumes, was hundreds of pages in, and suddenly I'm reading a story about possession, ghosts, and human sacrifice, along with FTL travel and galactic empires. I opted to see it through, despite some grave (no pun intended) misgivings. I wanted to see how Hamilton managed to explain, in a scientific way, how the "beyond" (purgatory, to you and me) worked. So I kept going.
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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful By T. Zenner on June 29, 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I liked the first book a lot, especially the first half of the first book. Like many reviewers, I bought all 3 at once, and plowed thru. All in all, I liked the trilogy except for the ending, although there were a number of weak points.

SPOILERS AHEAD:

The main problem for me is how cheap, fast, and rudely he ends this book and the trilogy. After reading 3400 pages, and tracking 4 or 5 main plot lines that you just KNOW are destined to all meet up in some amazing conclusion: they don't.

All the way along you have various heroes and heroines exhibiting courage, cleverness, and determination to win the 'little' battles in their plotline. You just KNOW somehow, by winning some of those battles that lesser folks would have surely lost, it will somehow contribute to winning the overall 'war'. They don't.

Halfway thru this last book in the trilogy, I started thinking: Whoa, he BETTER hurry up and start converging these plots! He's running out of pages to bring all of this together! When I was 3/4 thru and there was NO converging in sight, I started to get confused: What? Is there a 4th book that ties this all up? When I was 9/10 thru and STILL no converging, my heart was sinking. Then in the last 10 pages of the 3rd monster book of the trilogy, literally a miracle happens. Then a few paragraphs are written on each plotline, showing how all is well for the good guys, and how the bad guys all got their just desserts.

Bottom Line: I felt like the author just got tired of writing this series, and wrapped it up as fast as he possibly could.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Kevin on February 21, 2009
Format: Kindle Edition
This is the final book in his Night's Dawn Trilogy. I really enjoyed the scope of worlds and characters he created and the universe he put them in. He is able to do a great job bringing them all together. You'll obviously want to read the first two books first - The Reality Dysfunction and The Neutronium Alchemist. As a bonus if you are looking at this for the Kindle search for 'The Night's Dawn Trilogy' and you can get all 3 books together for $7.99.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Steven M. Anthony on March 22, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is the third and final book in Hamilton's three volume Night's Dawn trilogy, a 3,600 page behemoth to be sure. These are not stand alone novels and must be read not only in sequence, but in continuous, quick succession if you hope to keep on top of the various story threads.

I must say, that while I initially enjoyed this work immensely, the novelty and the outstanding hard science fiction concepts and practices began to wear a little thin after about 2,000 pages. Such things as medical and neural nanonics, anti-matter fuel and weaponry, Edenism, sentient habitats and space craft, human possession, non-human species (xenoc) and the various political subdivisions and splinter groups, while captivating for a time, ultimately become second nature. At that point, only the underlying story can support the reader's attention. While I was not in any way disappointed, as I said, by the time I finished the third book, two months after picking up the first (reading an hour or two every day) I was ready to be done with it.

About a third of the way through this final installment, I felt that several of the threads began to take bizarre, and at times ridiculous, turns (Mortonridge disappearance, Valisk dimension shift, to name a couple). I suspect that this could have been a perfectly satisfactory, three volume, 2,000 page story without some of the more extreme twists and turns that quite frankly detracted from my enjoyment of the experience. Glad I read it; glad it's over.
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