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22 of 22 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Wonderful!
I love this book because it reinforces the idea that people have a right to their given names and that they have a right to expect people to learn how to pronounce them. I work with many Chinese, Korean and Japanese students and it is common for these kids to feel the obligation to change their name, allow teachers and students mispronounce them if they do use their...
Published on April 1, 2008 by Lynn Ellingwood

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars Very long
It was lovely book for multiculturalism. It was however very long for 4-5yr olds to sit through. Nice message however.
Published 8 months ago by Julie-ann


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22 of 22 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Wonderful!, April 1, 2008
This review is from: The Name Jar (Paperback)
I love this book because it reinforces the idea that people have a right to their given names and that they have a right to expect people to learn how to pronounce them. I work with many Chinese, Korean and Japanese students and it is common for these kids to feel the obligation to change their name, allow teachers and students mispronounce them if they do use their given names, and their parents often tell them to get used to it rather than teaching them to assert themselves and expect people to learn how to pronounce them. If the child feels that they have a right to their name, the keep it, teach people how to pronounce it and feel better about themselves. If they change it, the given name still pops up on paperwork, people still mispronounce it and they are always trying to hide it away before it pops up again. Accepting your name and teaching people how to pronounce it, provides people with empowerment and a sense of some control over their lives. It helps a lot in the acculturaltion process.
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24 of 27 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Should be read in every elem.school. What does yr name mean?, October 26, 2002
This review is from: The Name Jar (Hardcover)
Yangsook (Rachel) Choi has written AND illustrated another illuminating book. Unhei has moved from South Korea with her family to America; she has brought her clothes, bags, and a name "chop" stamp from her grandmother. Her schoolmates cannot pronounce her name on the bus, so she doesn't reveal her name to her classmates. Is it good to be different? Should she embrace her difference? In America she can still eat seaweed and kimchi; she can shop at Kim's Market and Fadil's Falafel. But maybe a name of Amanda, Miranda, Daisy, or Tamela would be better than Unhei (Yoon-hye). The kids at school put name suggestions in a jar on her desk, but on the day she will choose her name, the jar has disappeared. Who took it? What will Unhei decide to do? Did Mr. Cocotos her teacher have a hand in this? Will all the kids want to choose a new name? A must read for every elementary school.
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13 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Name Jar by Yangsook Choi, February 7, 2002
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This review is from: The Name Jar (Hardcover)
Excellent piece of literature that addresses the emotional impact of change. The Name Jar pulls at the core of American assimilation and a loss of individuality to appease the intolerance of differences. Unhei must adjust to a new country, culture, school, and classmates, while she finds the transition from Korea to America difficult.
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9 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The author chose Rachel as her name. What will Unhei do?, May 5, 2004
This review is from: The Name Jar (Hardcover)
Unhei is starting school in America. Although she has a lovely Korean name that means "grace," she thinks maybe she would like a more American sounding name. Her classmates make a name jar and offers suggestions. This story is affirming of the multicultural experience. When Unhei complains about her name, saying that she doesn't want to be different, her mother counters, "You are different, Unhei....That's a good thing!" Choi superbly illustrates her own story. The characters, though simply painted, have expressive faces.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Explores issues of assimilation and cultural duality faced by immigrant children and their American classmates, October 5, 2009
This review is from: The Name Jar (Paperback)
Clutching the small wooden block with the characters of her Korean name carved into it, Unhei worries about being accepted and fitting in at her new school and new country. When she finds that the children have difficulty pronouncing her name, she decides to pick a new American name. Sensing her difficulty in choosing a name, Unhei's classmates create a name jar with suggestions for her. Finally, with the help of a new friend, she not only chooses a name that reflects her heritage and culture but also inspires her classmates to better understand cultural differences and similarities.

Yangsook Choi's charming story and illustrations explore issues of assimilation and cultural duality faced by immigrant children and their American classmates. It could well serve as the basis for classroom discussions of these issues and would be a welcome addition to class libraries.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Blending cultures, November 16, 2008
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This review is from: The Name Jar (Paperback)
I chose this book to introduce my children to literature written about Korean culture in America. We love the parallels to our life- a Halmoni living far away, a young girl nervous about school and fitting in with her classmates, and especially that the title character shares her Korean name with my daughter! This story crosses cultural differences to embrace the concepts of family love, friendship, cultural sensitivity and self esteem. What a wonderful story!The Name Jar
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars sweet, March 19, 2008
This review is from: The Name Jar (Hardcover)
i enjoyed this book. i was in the book store one day and it caught my eye so i flipped through it, and i'm glad i did. its about a little girl who comes from korea and moved to north america. she goes to school and doesn't want to tell the class her name because it is different, so she says she doesn't have a name, so her classmates make a name jar for her and put in names that she can use. then she gets a letter from her grandmother who is still in korea saying how much she loves her and in the letter was a seal with her name on it. after getting this she is once again proud of her name and goes back to school and tells her class mates her real name and what it means (i apologize if i got some of the details mixed up it was a while back that i read it). this book was a tear jerker for me. i'm not korean, nor have i had major problem with my name (though people often mispronounce it when reading it), but the struggle for the acceptance of one's self and one's own difference in comparison to others is something we all go through, and this story successfully displays that struggle and overcoming that struggle in a simple way. i think its a good way to get children to understand that though they are different, they will be accepted by someone, and opens them up to other cultures at the same time. worth the read.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Wonderful multicultural story!, February 22, 2014
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This review is from: The Name Jar (Kindle Edition)
This was a great story about a girl who moves to America from Korea. She feels uncomfortable that her name is so different from the American names. She learns that it is okay to be herself and that no child chooses his or her own name and that she is not so different after all.

This would be an excellent book to read to an elementary classroom to help children understand that it is okay to yourself and to learn about the similarities in all children.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great for teaching Cultural Awareness, January 5, 2014
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This review is from: The Name Jar (Paperback)
I bought this book to use in a college class I was taking. We had to find a cultural awareness book that would be good for children. This book fit the bill! It is about a girl who is embarrassed by her name. The kids in her class end up writing names in a "name jar" so she can pick a new name. In the end, she ends up embracing her name. It shows children that it is okay to come from another culture. It's good for students who are coming from another country and feel like they don't "fit in" and feel the need to assimilate. This book is filled with great pictures. It also shows a little bit of the Chinese culture (how her mom came to pick her name, and her family going to a Chinese market). I would recommend for any teacher!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Super book, October 22, 2013
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BK Shaw (Greenville, TX, US) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Name Jar (Paperback)
I love to use books in my classroom that encourages students to be more thoughtful of each other's feeling. Character education is needed in all schools.
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The Name Jar
The Name Jar by Yangsook Choi (Paperback - October 14, 2003)
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