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63 of 71 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Imaginative and well-written with unfortunate similarities to Tolkien
Alison Croggon is obviously a writer of great talent. I was sucked into her world and held riveted. Her language is lyrical and characterization is very strong. She's obviously put a lot of thought into her world.

Unfortunately for me, some of this was overshadowed by what I felt were unfortunate influences by Tolkien. Of course everyone who writes fantasy...
Published on May 24, 2006 by S. A. Cain

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81 of 91 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars The formula for success?
The scenario: An orphaned young protagonist is whisked away from a bleak existence by a mysteriously powerful stranger, introduced to a world of magic and intrigue in which she has by birthright a special place. In addition to her previously undiscovered, unpolished, and innumerable talents that stagger everyone with their power, she also happens to be the Fated One,...
Published on August 27, 2006 by C. Flanagan


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81 of 91 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars The formula for success?, August 27, 2006
The scenario: An orphaned young protagonist is whisked away from a bleak existence by a mysteriously powerful stranger, introduced to a world of magic and intrigue in which she has by birthright a special place. In addition to her previously undiscovered, unpolished, and innumerable talents that stagger everyone with their power, she also happens to be the Fated One, named in a mysterious prophecy as the hero to bring down a terrible villain so evil he is Nameless.

Sound familiar? It should, as it's impossible to skirt around the fact that The Naming is awash in clichés that evoke shades of every popular young adult fantasy series on the shelf today. But it would be a mistake to write this one off as just another would-be Tolkien-- despite the familiarity of the plot (and yes, a few settings ripped straight from Middle Earth), this particular attempt somehow manages to rise above the ranks of fellow imitators to become the real deal.

Surprisingly well-written (despite an arsenal of adverbs that would make even J.K. Rowling blanch, she said bewilderedly), the narrative is compelling even though one has the distinct feeling they know exactly where this one is headed. It's the characters, however, that drive this one, and though they might not be terribly original, they are nuance, complex, and compelling. Maered is a genuinely fascinating heroine, plucky and sympathetic, troubled and strong. Young girls looking for an inspiring fictional role model need look no further-- this is a girl who could twist Harry Potter into a pretzel, and then make him blush while discussing her menstrual cramps. Girls age twelve and up will most likely enjoy this series immensely.

In summary-- while the books of Pellinor are without question dwarfed among the ranks of fantasy classics, as a young adult fantasy series this one stands out above the rest. In fact, I'd even go so far as to say that it's series like these that are the reason The Formula works: although you know exactly how this one is going to end, you've become attached enough to the characters to follow them there. I know I will.
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63 of 71 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Imaginative and well-written with unfortunate similarities to Tolkien, May 24, 2006
This review is from: The Naming: The First Book of Pellinor (Pellinor Series) (Hardcover)
Alison Croggon is obviously a writer of great talent. I was sucked into her world and held riveted. Her language is lyrical and characterization is very strong. She's obviously put a lot of thought into her world.

Unfortunately for me, some of this was overshadowed by what I felt were unfortunate influences by Tolkien. Of course everyone who writes fantasy is influenced in one way or another by Tolkien. The Hulls didn't bother me as they did another reviewer--they're very obviously human and not nearly as powerful as Ringwraiths. But Ardina's forest hold did smack strongly of Lothlorien, and Cadvan, though I loved his character deeply, was more than a little reminiscent of Aragorn. There are numerous examples of times when, in my opinion, Croggon probably wrote what felt right to her without realizing how similar it was to Tolkien.

Does this mean the book isn't worth reading? By no means. I have read the Lord of the Rings so many times I can recite parts off by memory--there are doubtless many readers who aren't as obsessed with Tolkien as I am, and I am certain that those readers will be unhindered by these similarities. I enjoyed the books thoroughly, and will not hesitate to recommend them to several people I know who read fantasy.

Admittedly, I dislike fantasy stories that purport to be about this world in a long-gone age--that's a personal bias of mine, and for that reason I chose not to read the introduction. I don't think it takes away any of the pleasure of the books. I think Alison Croggon is very talented, and obviously, as a poet, she has a strong command of language. I do wish that there were fewer similarities, but I will point out that the first book bears much more similarity to Tolkien than the second book.

To me it feels as though Croggon became more comfortable with her own voice as she wrote the second book, and drew less heavily on the stories influencing her and more heavily on her own imagination. Definiately a strong addition to the Young Adult fantasy genre, and I look forward to the third book.
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18 of 22 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars It's a story you don't want to miss..., October 30, 2005
This review is from: The Naming: The First Book of Pellinor (Pellinor Series) (Hardcover)
I am a very big Tolkein fan. The style in which Alison writes "The Naming" reminds me in many ways of Tolkein. The Speech is spelt and sounds a lot like the Elven languages in Lord of the Rings, as well as all the poems that tell a story (and don't necessarily rhyme) but say so much in a few words.

However, I do not like Alison's books just because they remind me of Tolkein. They books are strictly Alison. I love them because you can tell they were crafted with thought and by someone who really loves to write.

I don't believe a story like this comes often. The Pellinor series is one of those rare books that come along that you just have to tell someone about, that you just have read over again, that you just have to scribble on your calendar the date the next book comes out and that you feel like you'd just go to pieces if you didn't have the books in your posession.

The imagery is fantastic, yet leaves so much for our imaginations to run. The story is timeless, yet it's one we've never heard before. The characters are endearing, no matter how brooding or tempered they are. The world it is set in is strange and so different from our own, but it feels like home.

I love this book simply because it gave me back the joy of reading and that elation that comes with being part of a wonderful story.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Beautifully crafted!, August 21, 2007
By 
I didn't expect what I would get out of this book when I first picked it up. When I started reading it, from start to finish, I was entranced in a world of fantasy. I will agree, there are some things about it that will turn some people away, which is understandible if you don't like how some books relate to others. For one, I immediately thought of the The Lord of the Rings. I don't think, however, that the characters or plot derived from the Lord of the Rings books. I honestly just think that it was written in a Tolkien fashion, as it was quoted by Tamora Pierce on the cover. But I think that some people will either like it or not like it because of that reason. Another thing that really drew me to this book was its very well written words and sentences. Because of its neatness and non-modern way of talking, the book had a very serious atmosphere. I wouldn't think that I would love reading about descriptions of landscapes in a book so much. I usually don't care too much for that. But in The Naming the author describes everything beautifully. If you don't exactly like detailed descriptions in fantasy books, I'd say give this one a try anyway. If you don't like it I understand. I was kind of surprised myself that I liked it so much. I felt like, by the end of the book, that I knew the characters that I had been journeying with throughout, which is a very good thing and sometimes for hard for authors to do. The central theme is, of course, good vs. evil. But I think that it goes a bit farther than even that. I think that, in the end, as it leaves it open for a second book, that Myraed will need to choose between that theme. I really don't have anything negative to say about this book. Myraed is very different from any other female heroine I've read about in books. Most of the time female point of views tend to get on my nerves. Their whiny, selfish, and too 'in distress'. But with Myraed, it's different. She hardly complains and goes about just trying to understand the world that she has never ventured into. Hem was a very likeable character but I didn't feel myself really warming to him until he left. I know that The Crow is pretty much about him, and I actually am looking forward to reading it. As long as the author continues to write in her well written fashion, then I would love to read it and The Riddle. Fantasy lovers, I suggest you pick this one up, even if it seems boring. If you don't like it, then toss it aside. But I truly do suggest this book. It is too wonderful of an experience to pass.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great Story!, January 16, 2007
A Kid's Review
This review is from: The Naming: The First Book of Pellinor (Pellinor Series) (Hardcover)
The Naming is about a girl named Maerad, a slave. She finds that she has the ability to use magic. Cadvan, a Bard, which is a sorcerer of light, helps Maerad escape slavery. By doing so, Maerad is enwrapped in a quest that will change her life.

The book starts in the household of Maerad's owner, Lord Gilman. His fortress, called Gilman's Cot, is dirty, stinky, and ugly. Maerad is protected there, because people think she's a witch, so Gilman makes sure that she doesn't come to harm. Only a few days earlier, some slaves were beaten because they tried to drown her.

This is when Cadvan comes into the story. He is so persuasive that Maerad goes with him to Innail, a fortress where many of Cadvan's friends, also Bards, live. Innail is a beautiful fortress, built with shining silver stones, and is filled with a warmth that Maerad is not used to. Everyone there is kind and happy, respecting her and letting her get used to Innail.

It is too dangerous to stay, so they travel through forests and plains. The forests are dense, dark and mysterious, while the plains are bland and open to all who come by. This is hard for them, because Cadvan is helping Maerad in her lessons on literature, magic, and warfare, so they have to be careful when they travel through plains.

Their destination is Norloch, a place where the Bards of power mainly are. Norloch is a place of beauty and wealth, where only the finest things are seen. The castle is gorgeous, and while the city isn't as nice, there are still many beautiful things. There is a deceitful glare that comes from Norloch, so Maerad and Cadvan are always on their guard. They meet with Bards, but these are not the kind Bards of Innail. These Bards are blank and cruel, led by the first Bard.

I really enjoyed this book. I read very quickly, but since this book was so long, it took me about the amount of time I like books to be. I would give it a 5 star rating, because it had action and mystery, but also a mixed balance of emotions. I would recommend this book to fantasy lovers, because it held a lot of magic inside!
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11 of 14 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Don't judge a book by its cover! Or the spine..., May 2, 2011
By 
Laura Merucci "marspeach" (Michigan, United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
I'm a big fan of fantasy and strong female characters. I also read a lot of young adult literature. The Naming, by Alison Croggon, combines all of these things. It's about a slave girl named Maerad who finds out she has special powers and goes on a journey to develop them. It's the first of four in the Pellinor Series. It sounds like a winner, right?

Wrong. The Naming, to me, is a prime example of why you should not judge a book by its cover- or in this case, the spine. I was browsing the YA section at my local Borders and this series caught my eye. The spines have a really nice design on them that I thought would look pretty on my shelf. Before you start laughing at me for blindly buying a book for that reason, just wait. I actually did read the blurb on the back and went home and read several reviews before I purchased it. The large majority of the reviews on Goodreads are very positive and it did sound good from all the summaries! It's supposed to be an "epic fantasy!"

Long story short, I was hugely disappointed. The storyline is very derivative, which is admittedly not necessarily a bad thing. There are no really original ideas anymore so everything depends on the execution- the author needs to put her own spin on things. Croggon did do this a little bit- her magical characters, or Bards, have powers based on language and music- that idea isn't all that common as far as I know. Yet this book only ended up as a poor man's Lord of the Rings for me. For one- it's boring. While nearly 600 pages, it's mind-numbingly slow-paced and nearly nothing happens! The majority of the book is just descriptions of the landscape and scenery on the journey Maerad and her mentor, Cadvan take. Croggon is apparently a poet and loves to describe all the forest and mountains and things in poetic detail. Although poetry's not really my thing, I thought it was nice at first. But it ended up probably taking up 2/3 of the book! I didn't need to read about every little thing the characters were eating.

Secondly, the characters are two-dimensional at best. At worst, less than one-dimensional. I knew nothing more about Maerad's personality at the end of the book than I did at the beginning, ditto Cadvan... and all of the other characters! I think the root of this problem was in the dialogue, or lack thereof. In between paragraphs of descriptions, the characters would have a couple lines of dialogue that usually sounded more like recited speeches than actual conversations. All the opportunities for character development were wasted.

I could go on and on about several more specific issues that bothered (or rather, bored) me, but this book isn't really worth it. It was dull and cliched; the few action scenes were not enough to save the rest of the story. I'm still baffled as to how this series is apparently so popular! There is a minority of negative reviews similar to my own that I've read, but very few. I won't be bothering with the rest of the series, no matter how pretty the set looks!
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11 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Captivating, fresh, and imaginative, June 28, 2005
By 
This review is from: The Naming: The First Book of Pellinor (Pellinor Series) (Hardcover)
Sixteen-year-old Maerad's life has been a difficult one ever since she saw her family and their home of Pellinor shattered by war. Maerad and her mother, Milana, were taken as prisoners and forced to work as slaves in a desolate place called Gilman's Cot. Years have passed, and now Maerad is an orphan with only her mother's lyre to give her peace in an otherwise wretched and miserable prison. Then one day, a mysterious traveler visits Maerad and brings surprising news about the girl. The traveler is named Cadvan of Lirigon and says that Maerad possesses a great potential for Barding --- a complex and magical craft in which a person's Gift can be used for the Light or sometimes the Dark.

Maerad is at first skeptical of the stranger, but accepts Cadvan's offer to help her escape from Gilman's Cot and take her with him to the School of Norloch. Maerad is soon on a journey through Annar, which slowly reveals secrets about her true heritage. Along the way, Maerad meets a cast of characters that are as unique as the many worlds of Edil-Amarandah. There's Silvia and Dernhil from the School of Innail, who each give Maerad friendship and knowledge unlike anything that she has ever known before, and Saliman of Turbansk, whose fiery wit and humor are much appreciated.

However, the path of self-discovery will not be an easy one as Maerad --- with the resilient and mysterious Cadvan as her teacher --- begins to learn how to use her amazing powers while on the run from the Nameless One's minions that threaten to disturb the Balance.

With a captivating plot and descriptive imagery, THE NAMING is both familiar and fresh in its originality. The concept of a lost manuscript makes the story seem strongly realistic while imaginative. This is the first book of a quartet that promises to be a favorite among fantasy fans. THE RIDDLE, the second installment in this thrilling fantasy adventure, is expected to arrive in the U.S. in 2006.

--- Reviewed by Sarah Sawtelle (SdarksideG@aol.com)
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14 of 18 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Interesting, July 16, 2006
I really enjoyed reading this book as it is so well written. The text flows right a long and you are rooting for the characters before you realize how attached you've become. Occationally, there is a very modern sounding phrase that pulls you out of the text a bit, but on awhole it is a very smooth and enjoyable read. When The ending is not really a cliff hanger it will leave you waiting impatiently for the next book in this series. Alison Croggon has made me a fan and I look forward to reading the rest of her work.
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20 of 27 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Flat Character, Predictable Plot, March 5, 2012
"The Naming" is described as being "Tolkien-esque." I'm fast learning that fantasy novels with this sort of description are generally very long and boring; this book is no exception. Spoilers follow.

"The Naming" tells the tale of Maerad, a sixteen-year-old whose story starts as a mistreated slave. She remembers nothing of her life before slavery, but soon discovers that she is descended from greatness when she is rescued from her plight by Cadvan, a mysterious and wise mage. Maerad begins to uncover her past, learning that she is the last of a once-noble family and posses great power.

She receives some basic training, and then she and Cadvan set off for the capital, travelling on back roads to avoid evil bards. From here, the novel turns into a travelling log with detailed descriptions of the land and its history. Along the way, Maerad learns more about her powers and family, the pair meets the Ice Witch, and they pick up Hem, a young boy who strongly resembles Maerad.

Upon reaching the capital, they find things to be in a dangerous state. The school of magic has barred women from attending and the head of the circle is cold and, it seems, corrupt. Cadvan and a few other bards determine that Maerad is, in fact, The One and that Hem is Maerad's brother. Maerad uncovers more of her family history, including who was responsible for the death of her parents. Cadvan's past is also revealed. It is determined that Hem and Maerad must be separated to continue their studies; while departing, Cadvan and Maerad are attacked by the head of the school but manage to escape. The novel ends with the pair sailing to a far off land.

The plot is, well, predictable...very predictable. It has a very typical story for the fantasy genre: orphaned teen discovers that they are the last of some faction capable of great power; they must travel with a mentor to become trained; they find out that they are the "chosen one," destined to rid the world of evil; for this reason, everyone wants to help or kill them. There aren't any surprises; for the most part, everything goes as you'd expect (with perhaps the exception of Cadvan's past, but that's a pretty small event). The book is over 500 pages long, but the story isn't nearly big enough to fill that many pages. Sticking to a tried-and-true story isn't necessarily a bad thing if the author puts a spin on it to make it their own. Croggon's concept of bards channeling magic through song and language is fairly unique (I don't recall having read it in a fantasy novel before), but nothing new is otherwise offered. A majority of the book is description of the land and its history, which gets very boring very quickly. That's the major complaint here: the story is predictable and boring.

The pacing of "The Naming" contributed to the story not feeling long enough. As mentioned earlier, a large percentage of the book is given to Maerad and Cadvan travelling to the capital. They get there about 100 pages from the end; a lot of that is contributed to the characters talking. The ultimate climax is short and unsatisfying, affirming that Maerad is The One, something most readers likely figured out long before this point. There is a brief battle as Cadvan and Maerad leave, but it's over after a couple of pages. The payoff honestly isn't worth getting through 400 or so pages of travelling. Most of the book is too slow and the climax and wrap-up are over too quickly. It was very difficult to stay engrossed in the story with its predictability and length to push through to the end.

Croggon's writing is actually very nice. She uses a somewhat poetic style to describe the world she created, and it works well. Everything scenic is described nicely and in a manner that seems to flow easily; it lends itself well to fantasy writing. The author is skilled and her writing style is beautiful.

It is also apparent that Croggon put a lot of time and thought into her world. This ends up being both a good and bad thing. Good because it gives the reader a pretty clear idea of where everything is and how things work. However, far too much of the book is spent describing the land and its history. Nearly everywhere the pair goes, Maerad asks Cadvan to tell her about the land, and then several pages are spent describing everything that has taken place in the area. It's not particularly interesting and it serves no purpose to the plot; it merely ends up wasting pages and dragging the book out far longer than it needs to be. It's great that the author put a lot of work into the setting, but she spends way too much time telling the reader about it.

While the author excels at describing the setting, she fails when it comes to the characters. The protagonist, Maerad, never demonstrates much of a personality. In the beginning, she has the maturity and mentality of a sixteen-year-old, which is perfectly fine. Unfortunately, she doesn't demonstrate any maturity by the end of the novel; her character never really grows. She spends most of the book, as to be expected from a character of this sort, being confused about her origins, powers, and future. This would work if the reader was given a decent idea of how Maerad actually felt; instead, we're bluntly told exactly how she feels. She's a boring protagonist who fails to show enough character to stay interesting. Her emotions seem to be getting mildly angry about something and sulking about it or passively watching and reacting to what's going on around her. A good fantasy series needs a captivating heroine, and Maerad simply doesn't fit the bill.

The other characters are equally as one-dimensional. Most can be split into two groups: those who like Maerad and are therefore good; and those who dislike Maerad and are resultingly bad. There is no room for ambiguity or complex characters, no shades of grey to be found. Cadvan and Hem show promise, but even they fail to be truly interesting. Things that should be big, such as Cadvan's reveal of his past, are brushed over rather quickly, leaving little room for any character development.

The character development is an issue that needs to be addressed. What little character-building there is happens far too quickly. For example, when Hem is introduced, he's scared and always on the alert, constantly looking for food, and attached to Maerad in a very child-like sort of way (that is, wanting to be around her for the feeling of safety and security). In the matter of a day, he is cleaned up, receives new clothes, and is suddenly more confident and mature than previously portrayed. Had this change taken place over time, it would have been believable; but he manages to get over a life of trauma in a day. He goes from being scared and unsure, to confidently reassuring his sister that everything will be all right in no time at all. It's not realistic, and unfortunately, most of the character development, what little there is, is handled in this manner.

A huge problem with the characters is that Croggon tells us about them more than she shows us. Rather than demonstrate how a character is feeling through actions or dialogue, she flat out tells us that the character is feeling this or that way. Adding to the problem is that the dialogue is very formal and flat, regardless of who is speaking. There is simply too much being told with no evidence of it being shown. For example, we're told that Maerad has learned a lot and matured for it, but we never actually see this; we're told that Cadvan and Maerad are very close, yet we never know or are shown why.

A couple more things regarding Maerad should be mentioned. First, many people either comment on her beauty or fall in love with her. When the character show so little personality and we're given very little idea of the appearance of any character, it's very difficult to figure out why Maerad is so popular. Second, did the author really need to update us on every period Maerad has? I feel that this was done to make the heroine more human and relatable, but it becomes eye-roll inducing and annoying. It's such a minor thing to bring up again and again and the characters make a big deal of it every time it happens. It's apparently so significant that, when given one wish by the Ice Queen, Maerad chooses to eliminate her period cramps, rather than something more important to her quest.

On a random note, Croggon includes a lot of her world's lore and language in the book. This isn't too uncommon for the fantasy genre and I can certainly appreciate the author giving it so much thought. However, I didn't find Maerad to be that intriguing of a character, so I wasn't very motivated to read the various poems and lore about her.

The best word to sum "The Naming" up is "boring." For something described as being "Tolkien-esque," it lacks the depth and excitement of Tolkien's books. The plot is very predictable and typical; the pacing is terrible with most of the novel reading like a travel log; the characters are one-dimensional; the dialogue is flat; character development is either too fast or lacking; and the book is entirely too long for what it is. Croggon's writing style is wonderful, she clearly put a lot of thought into the world presented, and her idea of bards using magic through language and music, but that isn't enough to make this book interesting or worth reading. I spent months reading it, often putting it down for long periods of time because I wasn't engrossed enough to continue; nothing about the book enticed me to keep reading or continue the series. One and a half stars, rounded down to one.
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7 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An Epic Adventure, May 18, 2005
This review is from: The Naming: The First Book of Pellinor (Pellinor Series) (Hardcover)
"A mist obscures the bright river, a mist on which no eye can fasten its sight, a mist that confuses the brave, and casts down the small in fear and trembling... All is in darkness and despair: corruption assails the High Seats of Annar, and those who truly follow the Light are cast into shadow. Seek then the one who comes Speechless from the Mountains: a Bard unSchooled and yet of this School. Seek and cherish the Fire Lily, the Fated One, which blooms the fairer in dark places and sleepeth long in darkenss; from such a root will blossom the White Flame anew, when it seems its seed is poisoned at the center." -Pg. 170, "The Naming"

Alison Croggon has created a world where magic, song, and adventure blend and merge into an incredible story about a female bard in this "First Book of Pellinor." "The Naming" is the first volume of four in the Pellinor series and is about the slavegirl Maerad who is discovered in the mountains by a bard named Cadvan (think of bards as magicians who can be gifted in craftsmanship, knowledge & lore, or healing similar to Tamora Pierce's "Circle of Magic" series but who also resemble Tolkien's elves).

Maerad and her teacher Cadvan journey through the lands of Annar in a desperate attempt to reunite her with her own kind but encounter many creatures of the Dark who would rather see her dead than fulfill an ancient prophecy that would return Annar to peace and prosperity.

Sometimes flowing as if a series of dreams, "The Naming" proudly marks itself as a great heroic tale that will certainly be placed with the likes of Tolkien's "The Lord of the Rings," Lucas' "Star Wars," and Tamora Pierce's "Trickster" duet. I am certain that the only disappointment readers will encounter with this book will be in the realization that only one of the Pellinor books will be released in America in 2005.
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The Naming: The First Book of Pellinor (Pellinor Series)
The Naming: The First Book of Pellinor (Pellinor Series) by Alison Croggon (Hardcover - May 10, 2005)
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