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The Nargun and the Stars (Puffin Books) Mass Market Paperback


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Product Details

  • Series: Puffin Books
  • Mass Market Paperback: 168 pages
  • Publisher: Puffin (May 1, 1988)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 014030780X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0140307801
  • Product Dimensions: 0.5 x 5.2 x 7.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 6.4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #282,702 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

The Hans Christian Andersen Medalist writes of Simon, an orphan who must come to terms with a mythic creature that threatens to destroy the boy's new family and everything else in its path. Ages 12-up.
Copyright 1988 Reed Business Information, Inc.

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By E. Lindsay on May 6, 2005
Format: Hardcover
This book stamped itself indelibly on my mind as a young girl growing up in Australia. It evokes the land and it's inhabitants, plant and animal alike, in a beautiful haunting story that never fails to rouse my love of this big red land on every read. This book gives insight to the heart and minds of every Australian and the bittersweet relationship between us and the environment. If you are a foreigner, it will give you a taste of the terrible beauty and history of this place. The story relates to the conflict of white australians in learning to live and respect this land that we love despite it's harshness, and find ways to live harmoniously with it's aboriginal people and it's history. But it is told in a fantasy that reminds me of dreamtime stories. This story is told so that past and present exist simultaneously, as it does in dreamtime history.

An orphan boy Simon is sent to live with some relatives in the country, and discovers that life is not always as it seems. As machinery goes missing from a local road project, he encounters strange creatures that live in the bush and the rocks and the trees, and works with them to divert a fearsome primitive being that is rampaging through the area. He learns to really see the world, to trust, to believe and ultimately to live his life fully.

Read it, and then take a walk in the Australian bush next visit- I promise you will have a new 'sense' of what surrounds you, and the possibilities of what may be encountered....
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Format: Paperback
An Australian fantasy which introduces us to the mythical beasts of this continent. The nargun is a rock-like being disturbed by a bulldozer and grader. The boy who lives on his family's station discovers that this ancient being has woken up and is not in a good mood. A pot-koorock - a mischievious but helpful froglike creature comes to talk to him and tells him about the nargun. There is also a bunyip or dangerous creature living in a waterhole.
I came to this book through reading other Australian books about brumbies and dingoes, but while there is less animal life in this one, the native monsters have never left me. The adventure is good and the writing is excellent.
Good for pre-teens to young teens.
Another book by this author is The Bunyip Hole but we do not get to meet a bunyip.
For stories of growing up on a station try Mary Elwyn Pachett, Elyne Mitchell, Reginald Ottley.
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By JF on March 19, 2011
Format: Mass Market Paperback
There is something about this book that reminds me a bit of that delightful classic The Princess and the Goblins, though it is much shorter and (judging only from my own experience) far less well-known. Although I am an American and (if I remember right) the story is set in Australia, and I was well into adulthood when I first read it, for me, this book is a keeper. There is something mystical or magical or whimsical about it, with just a light touch of scary, and I found it delightful. The first half was more interesting to me than the part that takes place underground, though.
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