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The Narrated Bible in Chronological Order (NIV) Hardcover – August 1, 1999


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 1728 pages
  • Publisher: Harvest House Publishers; Subsequent edition (August 1, 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0736902392
  • ISBN-13: 978-0736902397
  • Product Dimensions: 9.5 x 6.7 x 1.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.6 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (117 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #28,508 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

F. LaGard Smith is the author of more than 25 books. He is the arranger and narrator of The Daily Bible and its companion volume, The Daily Bible Devotional.Smithdoes much of his writing in the quiet Cotswold countryside of England. In the States, Smith has spent a lifetime teaching both law and religion at Christian universities.

More About the Author

F. LaGard Smith was born in 1944 in Houston, Texas, thereafter living in Shawnee and Tulsa, Oklahoma, Lancaster, Texas, and Birmingham, Alabama, before heading off to college at Florida College, graduating from Willamette University with both an undergraduate and law degree.

Smith was a District Attorney for Malheur County, Oregon for three years, served as an administrator for the Oregon State Bar in Portland for a year, then spent 27 years teaching at Pepperdine University School of Law in Malibu, California, focusing on Criminal Law, Criminal Procedure, Trial Practice, and Law and Morality.

For five years, Smith was Scholar in Residence for Christian Studies at Lipscomb University in Nashville, Tennessee, then taught for two years at Liberty University School of Law, and currently is Professor of Law at Faulkner University's Jones School of Law in Montgomery, Alabama.

Smith has written some 30 books--legal, social, doctrinal, and devotional. He is most widely known as the compiler and narrator of "The Daily Bible," the NIV in chronological order.

A popular speaker, Smith has been on the circuit for many years, and has also made frequent guest appearances on radio and television.

Smith and his wife Ruth live in Alabama, Tennessee, and--with every opportunity--at their cottage in the English Cotswolds where he does much of his writing.

Customer Reviews

We have purchased several copies of this book over the years.
Sharon Kay Harris
We thought that a chronological Bible would keep their interest and give them an understanding of the Biblical events within a historical background.
PastorB
He also divides The Narrated Bible into daily readings for those wanting to read this through in a year.
Soozie4Him

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

169 of 171 people found the following review helpful By Roger L. Johnson on August 13, 1999
Format: Hardcover
A very excellent work which shows a tremendous amount of research. F. LaGard Smith has attempted and succeeded in accomplishing what the title says: to lay out the entire Bible chronologically. When the term "narrated" is used in the title it should not be miscontrued as his narration. His comments are kept to a mimimum and are highlighted as his. His perspective is clear. The Bible is capable of standing on its own to express itself historically. The only time he breaks with the historical narrative structural theme is when the purpose counteracts the historical narrative, i.e. the grouping of the religious, criminal, and civil laws of the Israelites. I did not feel I could agree on the placement of both Job and the Book of Galatians in the structure of the historical narrative but those are minor criticisms compared to the tremendous work that went into it. His choices for their inclusion at the points he chose are valid options among scholars and are not lightly discounted. I have read through the "Narrated Bible" at least four times and I am now on my fifth. The breakdown into daily readings provides an easy way to use it as a daily devotional tool. The indices include a chronology of significant events, a daily Bible Reading Schedule, and a cross reference index as well as a various assortment of maps. The text is from the New International Version. I wholeheartedly recommend the volume to anyone who enjoys daily Bible readings and a study of the scriptures in general.
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106 of 107 people found the following review helpful By Soozie4Him VINE VOICE on November 15, 2001
Format: Hardcover
This Bible is wonderful for putting events into historical context. While it should not be the only Bible you read, or the Bible you take to church with you, this is unique and can help you GREATLY in understanding the order of events in the life of God's people.
The 4 gospels are put into one long story called "Life of Jesus". This is a HUGE help! You can so much more easily take in all that the Bible tells us about our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ! In the Old Testament, the author combines the events of Samuel, the Kings and the Chronicles - most layment are confused by these books and if you're reading them in order, you'll find yourself saying "Didn't we cover this already?". Having it all put together in one story is so helpful!
F. LaGard Smith includes some "devotional commentary", which is clearly marks as such. He also divides The Narrated Bible into daily readings for those wanting to read this through in a year. The sun icon tells you you've reached the end of that day's reading. If you want this same text to be divided up by date (like the One Year Bible), you can get "The Daily Bible".
You will find the prophecies of Isaiah and Jeremiah put into their historical context - I believe that your faith will be enriched and your understanding improved by this wonderful book!
Oh, something important to mention is that you can always easily find exactly what verse you're reading. The reference is in the margin, and in the case of the Gospels, all references to that event are noted, with reference used by the wording of the passage is highlighted in bold.
There is also a complete index, so you can quickly find any verse in the Bible. So you needn't worry about not knowing what book of the Bible you're reading.
Read more ›
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146 of 154 people found the following review helpful By B. Herman on August 29, 2002
Format: Hardcover
I have been enjoying The Narrated Bible for a year and a half now and have specifically enjoyed the chronological order. However, just recently, I was reading a portion in the Gospels (page 1375) that had Mathew 8::14-15, 16-17. This happens to be one of my favorite portions of scripture, so I was excited to read it. However I noticed that it didn't contain verse 17 (which is a quote from Isaiah 55). I thought that was rather strange, so I looked up Mathew 8:17 in the index (page 1712) in the back of the Bible. It indicated that this particular verse should be found on page 1385. So I flipped over to 1385, and there isn't a single scripture on that page from chapter 8, its all from chapter 7.
I called Harvest House Publishing to ask them about the missing scripture, and they told me that they used a parallel account of Peter's mother in law getting healed where it doesn't mention the fulfillment of the Isaiah text. I understand there need to make the Bible flow correctly, but leaving out that particular piece is rather disturbing to me.
So basically, this single scripture (Mathew 8:17) does not appear in this Bible. It makes me wonder what other scriptures are missing. I will continue to use this Bible, but I will always be wondering what is being left out.
Though you should know before you pick one up.
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49 of 51 people found the following review helpful By Joseph O. Perry on August 11, 2001
Format: Hardcover
When reviewing this book, one must remember that it is not the NIV translation of the Bible that is being reviewed or the Holy Scriptures themselves. This review is purely based on the narrative that F. LaGard Smith has provided and the order in which the scripture is presented. I have read the KJV, the NLT, the NAS and the Amplified translations previously and I find that the "Narrated Bible" is by far the easiest to comprehend. The narrative commentary is brief but most helpful in giving a general overview of the scripture to follow. Is enlightens but never overwhelms. The sections in which Smith fills in gaps in the scripture (such as the intertestiment age) are very enlightening. The real strength of this book is in the ordering of the material. By grouping the material chronogocially the scriptures seem to flow and connect better than in the more traditional Bibles. Events that relate more clearer to the people involved and when they happens in relationship to other events and people make more sense.One could dispute the placement or order of some of the material (The scholars have not reached full consensus about the dates of many events),but Smith has done a very reasonable job of chronological organization. I would not suggest that this be the Bible that one carries to church each Sunday as following along in the service would require cross referencing the material (even though a cross reference is included in the book)or that this be the only Bible that you have. I would suggest that this would be an excellent Bible to read and study from if you wish to keep things in their proper historical perspective. It is an excellent addition to one's religious library and I would heartily recommend it.
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