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Product Details

  • Audio CD
  • Publisher: Time Warner AudioBooks (May 3, 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 158621635X
  • ISBN-13: 978-1586216351
  • Product Dimensions: 6.2 x 5.1 x 1.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 9.6 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (506 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #228,516 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Those who are familiar with the audio adaptations of Connelly's books will be delighted to see that Cariou lends his talents to Connelly's latest mystery, which is a sequel to The Poet (1996). At the center of this engrossing thriller is world-weary, retired L.A. homicide detective Harry Bosch. While investigating the death of ex-FBI profiler Terry McCalab, Bosch begins to suspect that the notorious serial killer The Poet, presumed dead, may be the culprit. As he digs deeper, Bosch meets and eventually joins forces with FBI agent Rachel Walling, who went up against The Poet the first time around. The novel's point of view cuts from Bosch's first-person commentary to the third-person perspectives of Walling and The Poet. Cariou handles these changes with professional ease. He gives Bosch a rough voice, raspy with experience, and provides Walling with a younger, but no less tough, intonation. Cariou's vocal dexterity becomes truly apparent, however, when he reads Connelly's descriptive passages. Whether he is illuminating a grisly crime scene, a rainstorm pummeling a Los Angeles freeway or a soft moment between Bosch and his young daughter, Cariou perfectly captures the subtleties of Connelly's tightly written prose.
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

From Bookmarks Magazine

With a writer of Connelly’s popularity, particularly one that works with a regular cast of characters, mixed reviews are to be expected. Each successive book opens the possibility of a narrative letdown. Part of Connelly’s decision to collate a few of his most enduring characters into The Narrows was to address concerns many fans had with the ending of The Poet. Though it strikes a few critics as a risky move that doesn’t bear repeating, the general consensus is that Connelly pulls the sequel off. Some reviewers disagree about whether the back-story is ample enough for the uninitiated. But whether The Narrows is his best or his worst work, its has elements of both, and plenty of the subtle characterization and gripping storyline that fans have come to expect from Connelly.

Copyright © 2004 Phillips & Nelson Media, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.


More About the Author

Michael Connelly decided to become a writer after discovering the books of Raymond Chandler while attending the University of Florida. Once he decided on this direction he chose a major in journalism and a minor in creative writing ' a curriculum in which one of his teachers was novelist Harry Crews.

After graduating in 1980, Connelly worked at newspapers in Daytona Beach and Fort Lauderdale, Florida, primarily specializing in the crime beat. In Fort Lauderdale he wrote about police and crime during the height of the murder and violence wave that rolled over South Florida during the so-called cocaine wars. In 1986, he and two other reporters spent several months interviewing survivors of a major airline crash. They wrote a magazine story on the crash and the survivors which was later short-listed for the Pulitzer Prize for feature writing. The magazine story also moved Connelly into the upper levels of journalism, landing him a job as a crime reporter for the Los Angeles Times, one of the largest papers in the country, and bringing him to the city of which his literary hero, Chandler, had written.

After three years on the crime beat in L.A., Connelly began writing his first novel to feature LAPD Detective Hieronymus Bosch. The novel, The Black Echo, based in part on a true crime that had occurred in Los Angeles , was published in 1992 and won the Edgar Award for Best First Novel by the Mystery Writers of America. Connelly has followed that up with 18 more novels. His books have been translated into 31 languages and have won the Edgar, Anthony, Macavity, Shamus, Dilys, Nero, Barry, Audie, Ridley, Maltese Falcon (Japan), .38 Caliber (France), Grand Prix (France), and Premio Bancarella (Italy) awards.

Michael lives with his family in Florida.

Customer Reviews

This book is hard to put down, it keeps you on the edge of your seat.
pc
In essence, The Narrows just seems to have way too many spoilers of other Michael Connelly books.
Jack Wires
Connelly weaves an excellent story with excellent characters and plot.
J. Johnston

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

58 of 62 people found the following review helpful By Red Rock Bookworm TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on September 9, 2007
Format: Paperback
Most Michael Connelly fans will remember FBI profiler and heart transplant survivor Terry McCaleb, from the book Blood Work (and some may have seen the movie of the same name starring Clint Eastwood), as well as L.A.P.D. detective Harry Bosch (The Closers, Trunk Music, etc.) currently retired from the department and working as a P.I.. Then of course there is Robert Backus, villain extraordinaire with a penchant for the poetry of Edgar Alan Poe, who horrified us with his dirty deeds in The Poet.

In The Narrows, Connelly brings together all the characters from these previous novels and adds another, FBI agent Rachel Walling, to the mix as she and Bosch attempt to determine whether Terry's death is "by natural causes" as reported on his death certificate or, as his wife suspects, was in fact a deviously planned and executed murder.

Connelly is famous for his character driven plots and of course the world weary Harry Bosch is the driving force in this investigation. Connelly does however deviate from his previous works by delivering the story from the perspective of three characters rather than just one. Throughout, he completely involves the reader by leading us into the labyrinth, throwing us a curve here and there, and slowly feeding us clues that culminate with a solution to the mystery.

Although, in my humble opinion, not the best book Connelly has ever written, it is a solid mystery/thriller that is head and shoulders above a lot of the material currently rolling off the presses at some publishing houses.
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90 of 100 people found the following review helpful By G. Passantino on May 4, 2004
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Looking for proof that Michael Connelly is the best mystery novelist today? The Narrows is evidence enough. On a very simple level, this is a mystery novel about a serial killer, "The Poet," and at least 14 murders attributed to him in this current wave of mayhem. It's also about a complex ex-LAPD homicide detective, Harry Bosch, and a frustrated FBI Behavioral Sciences Unit reject agent, Rachel Walling. The characters are complex, conflicted, believable, and stretched beyond what is expected but not beyond the potential of each soul. Even the two major locations, Los Angeles and Las Vegas, are drawn with such intensity and multi-faceted power that they almost become characters in themselves. The plot is intricate, surprising, and challenging -- but ultimately so finely composed and exquisitely executed that even the final shock in the last few pages, while completely unsuspected, still resonates with complete authenticity and credibility. And underneath everthing beats the heart of Michael Connelly's mission: to describe the deadly dance between good and evil, a dance that comes within a hair's breadth of consuming both, but ends with hope. The book opens with the powerful intensity of the threat of evil: "I knew that my life's mission would always take me to the places where evil waits, to the places where the truth that I might find would be an ugly and horrible thing. And still I went without pause. And still I went, not being ready for the moment when evil would come from its waiting place. When it would grab at me like an animal and take me down into the black water." And it ends with the dawn of hope: "I looked out at the city and thought it was beautiful.Read more ›
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42 of 45 people found the following review helpful By Craobh Rua on June 25, 2004
Format: Hardcover
Michael Connelly's 14th book - his 10th to feature Harry Bosch - is the book he once swore he'd never write : the sequel to "The Poet". For it, he's assembled an all-star cast. Bosch, a former member of the LAPD and now a card carrying PI - is joined by FBI Agent Rachel Walling. Walling was one of the central characters of "The Poet" and - at the time - was based at BSS in Quantico. However, shortly after the events of that book, she was "demoted" to North Dakota. Terry and Graciela McCaleb and Buddy Lockridge - who all made their first appearances in "Blood Work" - also have parts to play. Of the three, Terry's is the smallest, but certainly the most significant. Cassie Black, the central character of "Void Moon", also makes an appearance - if you know where to look. And then, obviously, there's the Poet.
Bosch now divides his time between LA and Vegas, where he rents a small one room efficiency to be near his daughter. Things aren't going well between Harry and his ex-wife, Eleanor Wish - who makes her living at the city's poker tables. Harry's first appearance in the book sees him talking to Terry McCaleb's widow. Graciela. Terry was a former FBI Agent, and had previously worked a couple of cases with Harry. His first appearance was in the 'solo' novel "Blood Work". This was only Connelly's second book not to feature Bosch, and was later made into a movie starring Clint Eastwood. Terry has recently died of a heart attack while on a fishing trip, after having received a heart transplant a number of years earlier. Graciela, however, believes the heart attack was caused because someone interfered with his medication - essentially meaning he was murdered. Graciela wants Bosch to look into it, an assignment he is happy to accept.
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