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  • The Nasty Girl [1991] [DVD]
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The Nasty Girl [1991] [DVD]


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The Nasty Girl [1991] [DVD] + Against the Stream: Growing Up Where Hitler Used to Live + Out of Passau: Leaving a City Hitler Called Home
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Product Details

  • Actors: Lena Stolze, Hans-Reinhard Müller, Monika Baumgartner, Elisabeth Bertram, Michael Gahr
  • Directors: Michael Verhoeven
  • Writers: Michael Verhoeven
  • Producers: Michael Verhoeven, Helmut Rasp, Senta Berger
  • Format: PAL
  • Language: German (Dolby Digital 2.0)
  • Subtitles: English
  • Region: All Regions
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.33:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated: PG-13 (Parental Guidance Suggested)
  • Studio: Arrow Films
  • DVD Release Date: June 29, 2011
  • Run Time: 80 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (45 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B0006SJ3IQ
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #183,013 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)
  • Learn more about "The Nasty Girl [1991] [DVD]" on IMDb

Special Features

None.

Editorial Reviews

United Kingdom released, PAL/Region 0 DVD: it WILL NOT play on standard US DVD player. You need multi-region PAL/NTSC DVD player to view it in USA/Canada: LANGUAGES: German ( Dolby Digital Stereo ), English ( Subtitles ), SPECIAL FEATURES: Cast/Crew Interview(s), Interactive Menu, Scene Access, Trailer(s), SYNOPSIS: Lena Stolze stars as Sonja, a young Bavarian woman whose submission to an essay contest explores her hometown's affiliation with the Third Reich; as she learns more and more of the truth, she is increasingly victimized by her fellow townspeople, who do not want the scars from their past ripped open anew. SCREENED/AWARDED AT: BAFTA Awards, Berlin International Film Festival, Golden Globes, Oscar Academy Awards, Vancouver International Film Festival, ...The Nasty Girl ( Das Schreckliche Mädchen )

Customer Reviews

Excellent story of a young German student who writes an essay about her town's history during WW2.
piki1
The director's deliberate choice of a surrealistic filming works perfectly, knowing that the main character's experience of her life is surreal in itself.
Michael A. Kalm
And the promising student who sees this can only be called "A Nasty Girl"... Like Sonja herself, this film has a way of getting under many viewers skin.
Winthrop Harrison

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

38 of 39 people found the following review helpful By Gary F. Taylor HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on August 31, 2002
Format: VHS Tape
German playwright Bertolt Brecht felt that theatre should teach the audience certain moral lessons, and to this end he developed a mode of presentation frequently described as "theatre of alienation"--a type of production in which the audience is never allowed to fully indentify with the characters and their situations and is instead asked to critically observe the material and draw conclusions from it. For the most part, this is a style that works best on the stage--but director Michael Verhoeven uses it as a springboard for THE NASTY GIRL. And the result is one of the few instances in which these Brechtian concepts come successfully to the screen.
The story is wickedly funny. A bright young lass, the daughter of two teachers, wins an essay contest--and when the next contest is announced she again decides to compete, this time with an essay on "My Hometown During The Third Reich," in which she plans to show how her small Bavarian town resisted Nazism. But few, even those regarded by the townfolk as heroes of that era, are willing to discuss it--and those that do provide conflicting information. She eventually gives up the project, but it continues to fester in the back of her mind, and some years later when she resumes her research with the idea of writing a book she discovers that the anti-Nazi heroes were not, perhaps, either anti-Nazi or heroic.
The main thrust of the film centers upon Sonja's relentless battle against the powers that be to obtain access to documents from the Nazi era, and how civic leaders work to frustrate her--both by persistently dodging her demands for the material and by direct terrorism. But their resistance makes Sonja all the more determined, and she becomes willing to pay any personal price.
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13 of 13 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on May 30, 1999
Format: VHS Tape
This is one of my favorite movies that I have watched countless times ever since I purchased it. It's got a great plot along with good acting. The movie's plot deals with how a girl researched and uncovered a lot of history that the town folks would rather have kept hidden and buried, regarding the role the German town took during World War II. Lena Stolze does a great job in the lead role. This is one of the best German movies I've ever seen. The only thing that should be changed is the title of the movie. It's misnamed. The title is very misleading and more than likely keeps people from viewing this. But other than that, this is a great movie that's also funny that you can watch over and over. Totally recommended.
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16 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Winthrop Harrison on July 1, 2002
Format: VHS Tape
Ahh. Germany has changed in the early '60s, trashing the ghost of Hitler's Third Reich. But has it really? Bright young Sonja researches the history of town of Pfilzing, to tell the story of how one German town resisted Nazi fascist ideas. The more she pushes, the more she learns a sad reality - in Germany's monumental tragedy, there were few true innocents.
The people of her town are not evil by any means, but their resistance to Sonja becomes increasingly aggressive, as they try to forgive the sins of their parents. The town is haunted by shame - shame is the central idea of the film. Pfilzing denies the past and protects the guilty. It is a town that cannot be free. And the promising student who sees this can only be called "A Nasty Girl"...
Like Sonja herself, this film has a way of getting under many viewers skin. Many reviewers - including Roger Ebert - admire the story but feel the arty "New German Wave" edits/art design clash badly with the subject matter. I could not disagree more. The story is unusually strong, so I suppose a somber po-faced approach might have made for an equally good film. But that would take out all I loved in this movie, making it a typical Holocaust film. The creative edits, avante-garde art design and cinematography create a world full of surprise and humor. By showing the comedy of life, you see how wonderful life is. And the fact that so many German Jews are not there to see it or share it, the tragic message comes clear. This movie may dare to smile - but the shadow of history is in every frame.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Rottenberg's rotten book review on November 8, 2001
Format: VHS Tape
Lena Stolze is Sonja, the "Nasty Girl", a pint-sized girl from a small homey but slightly sinister German town. Not slightly precocious, Sonja is an iconoclast in the Luther mold. As the middle-child in a comfy family in the fictitious Berg of Pfilzing, Sonja arouses ire as a schoolgirl by her attempts to write an essay on the experiences of "Meine Heimat in der Drechsen Reich" - my hometown during the Third Reich. Already famous for winning an earlier essay, Sonja presses ahead on this new essay, interviewing townspeople and meeting resistance from every direction. (Few believe Sonja's stated intention of depicting heroic commoners resisting the Nazi regime). Not ready to give way when her essay fails to materialize, Sonja turns her energies to writing a book, and resistance becomes more heated. Friends turn away from her, town fixtures turn on her, her family becomes embattled (her parent's house is bombed). Worse, just getting the documentary evidence proves virtually impossible, since those who run the town's archives want to avoid scrutiny on themselves. Through luck and pluck (she tricks an unwitting substitute archivist into letting her access the records, then sneaks them out of the library with the mail), Sonja manages to uncover the proof that implicates various respected citizens, which only gets her into more trouble.
"Nasty" is a peerless gem of a film. Michael Verhoeven (not the "Showgirls" guy) crafts a movie that aims to tell different kinds of stories - and manages to pull off each one. Verhoeven allows the film a tinge of lightness that doesn't undermine the seriousness of the subject matter, but does underscore the humanity of the characters, especially Stolze's adorable Sonja. Nobody's a hero, but it doesn't take a hero to be horrified at the specter of the Holocaust.
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