Customer Reviews


49 Reviews
5 star:
 (37)
4 star:
 (8)
3 star:
 (4)
2 star:    (0)
1 star:    (0)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favorable review
The most helpful critical review


41 of 42 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fantastic book on the importance of bringing nature home
Now having read an advanced copy of Louv's new book The Nature Principle, I am moved by his case for bringing nature into our urban centers. Louv is correct that adults need nature too...we need it to weave our affinity for nature together with our day-to-day surroundings. This book is the best overall summary of many different works, and does exceptionally well at...
Published on April 20, 2011 by Elliott Wright

versus
41 of 45 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Very Pop-Science
I had never read Louv before; only read of him. And I always seemed to agree with his diagnoses of modern people, especially children: too little nature, too little unstructured time. I bought this book with the hope of it addressing that problem in a social, or at least personal way: what are we going to do about all this? And the introduction was promising...
Published 22 months ago by Jasper L. Mcchesney


‹ Previous | 1 25 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

41 of 42 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fantastic book on the importance of bringing nature home, April 20, 2011
This review is from: The Nature Principle: Human Restoration and the End of Nature-Deficit Disorder (Hardcover)
Now having read an advanced copy of Louv's new book The Nature Principle, I am moved by his case for bringing nature into our urban centers. Louv is correct that adults need nature too...we need it to weave our affinity for nature together with our day-to-day surroundings. This book is the best overall summary of many different works, and does exceptionally well at revealing the growing body of research around the influence of nature on human health. His findings suggest that a lack of `nature nearby' may be associated with an epidemic of obesity and diabetes, asthma, behavior disorders, depression and a diminished sense of place and community. However, as Louv conveys in his book, he is optimistic the trend can be reversed if we bring nature back into our backyards, neighborhoods, and schools. This book is not simply to be read in passing, but incorporated into our daily experience of life.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


41 of 45 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Very Pop-Science, February 23, 2013
I had never read Louv before; only read of him. And I always seemed to agree with his diagnoses of modern people, especially children: too little nature, too little unstructured time. I bought this book with the hope of it addressing that problem in a social, or at least personal way: what are we going to do about all this? And the introduction was promising.

Sadly, only a few sections resemble that introduction: the chapters dealing with Louv's family and personal experiences are well written and have some real force behind them. But they're only short intermissions between pages and pages of enumeration. The bulk of this book is a catalog of recent scientific experiments, most of which "hint" or "suggest" that nature is good for us in one way or another. The formula is for Louv to tell us about a scientist or institution, describe them, then describe their experiment, then meekly repeat its tentative results. Now science is supposed to be tentative, but I kept thinking (even as someone who fully believes nature is important), "That's it? That's your evidence?" The problem is, I think, the whole approach: Louv likes nature, and he's convinced that only a barrage of science will be adequate for convincing anyone else. I'm trained as a scientist, and yet I don't believe that: maybe we can just, yunno, like nature, and think it's important. Instead Louv falls into a sort of science fetish, especially around new whiz-bang apparatus like neuro-imaging (your thoughts are only valid if we can see what part of your brain "lights up" when you think them). It's all very breathless, with no end of goofy coined phrases -- like a less clever Malcolm Gladwell (who is himself not all that clever).

I don't disagree with Louv in the least. And if you want an armory of studies to throw at other people, this will certainly familiarize you with what's out there. But do I really want to value nature because "vitamin N" might improve my test performance 2%, or increase my seratonin levels? This line of thinking misses the point. And in fact, it falls into just the trap that harms nature the most: quantifying its specific functionality to us, and not actually seeing anything inherently worthwhile in it.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


16 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great, May 28, 2011
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: The Nature Principle: Human Restoration and the End of Nature-Deficit Disorder (Hardcover)
I would reccomend the Nature Principal to anyone interested in improving their health and well being of the environment. I am a teacher and I have gotten tons of ideas on how to help my students and families for their homes and the classroom. It is also a great reference book to keep going back to for a lot of home, gardening, and community activities.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


19 of 20 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Nature Principle, May 5, 2011
By 
Amy Beam (Derwood, MD United States) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Nature Principle: Human Restoration and the End of Nature-Deficit Disorder (Hardcover)
I wholeheartedly recommend this book to every human who has a body, mind and spirit! The Nature Principle is so informative and inspiring. Not only are the authors observations and concerns explored in an easily accessible manner, but they also provoke thoughtful consideration and suggest reasonable action. I had intended to read this book outdoors, but found myself moving inside to my reading lamp as the sun went down! It was too compelling to put down as night fell!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Pull yourself away from electronic connections, July 26, 2011
By 
AJ Turner (Grafton, ND USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: The Nature Principle: Human Restoration and the End of Nature-Deficit Disorder (Hardcover)
Louv's first "nature volume"(Last Child In the Woods, The Nature-Deficit Disorder)reminded us of the need to get our kids into the outdoors, someway, somehow. Now, he reminds us that we adults need some "nature treatment" ourselves. We have to set the example for our families. He does it in readable/scientific/storytelling way. A fast, easy read? No, not if you want to understand the problems and connections to ADHD and obesity, not only in kids, but adults, too. I recommend both books!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Inspiring and Full of Hope!, July 1, 2011
This review is from: The Nature Principle: Human Restoration and the End of Nature-Deficit Disorder (Hardcover)
After reading Last Child in the Woods: Saving Our Children From Nature-Deficit Disorder, I was deeply moved and inspired to focus my career on this path. And seeing him speak at a Long Island event confirmed my resolution to do what I can to move myself and others away from nature deficit disorder.

Now this book brings much hope and inspiration for me and hopefully many, many others to follow. Louv covers a broad range of related topics and ideas for us to all find our own way of deepening our connection and helping others to find theirs.

Now, I am researching for my own book, taking much inspiration from Louv's books, to go deeper into how we can connect to nature within the built environment from a biophilic design and feng shui perspective. I am grateful to Louv, the broad range of like-minded individuals he interviewed and for Algonquin Press, to see the vision of how we can move into a more hopeful future. Bravo!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Get off the computer, put down the iPod and go outside!, September 11, 2011
This review is from: The Nature Principle: Human Restoration and the End of Nature-Deficit Disorder (Hardcover)
This book offers empirical evidence that time outdoors in nature makes us healthier, calms people with ADD, and lowers chances of obesity. In addition, studies have proven that time in nature makes a person more creative and increases intelligence levels. This does not have to be access to "100 acres" in the back woods of Oregon. Even people who have a view of a tree outside their window are positively impacted.

This book showed me that experiencing nature doesn't have to be complicated or expensive. It just needs to be regularly incorporated into our lives.

I highly recommend this book, with the one caveat that it is not light reading and is not a book to be read in one sitting. It's a book to be pondered and acted upon.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Wake-Up Call to the Slaves of Technology, September 7, 2011
This review is from: The Nature Principle: Human Restoration and the End of Nature-Deficit Disorder (Hardcover)
In this sequel to Last Child in the Woods: Saving Our Children From Nature-Deficit Disorder, Louve continues his powerful plea for people to get back outside and reconnect with nature. No, this isn't some new-agish-touchy-feely movement. This is simply back to a few decades ago when children (and adults) ran wild outside, not living in fear in their homes, growing fat and unhealthy in front of their televisions. You had to drag kids back in. Adults spent the weekends outside, not paying the cable company obscene amounts of money to sit in their own living rooms. It was common sense that enjoying the outdoors was healthy. Since man first appeared, the wilderness helped him relax, unstress and heal. After much progress in health and conservation, now we are on the backward slide of seeing the potential of the new generations not being as healthy or living as long. Too much blind acceptance that everything we eat or do is safe. Addicted to technology so that we can't socially function or have any survival skills. There is, however, hope. Many see that simpler is sometimes better. Nature isn't some abstract hippie theory. Our excesses have impacted health. Yes, technology is important, but has its limits. The past futurists saw it as an aid, a time saver, not a hinderance to human function or our future development. Future-thinking towns are building parks again. Trails. Outdoor church. These aren't new ideas. Just forgotten ones. Sometimes Louv, and others, make our connection to nature to be a result of the failed evolution paradigm (Origins of Life, Who Was Adam?, The Cell's Design). We wouldn't be here if we relied on chance. No, our many thousands of years of living in nature has made the connection. Our sharing of the same elements and structures. We are connected deeply, but also are still very unique. We are designed to be compatible, to eat from nature, our bodies don't know what to do with synthetic food and chemicals, we get sick. We are a technological society and always will be. Man, however, has a history of over-doing it and self-destructing. Louv's books are an important wake-up call to all. The sort of books all should read. See also Simple Life, Back to Basics & Better Off.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars eye opening, July 11, 2013
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This book has totally changed my outlook on the importance of being outside especially with my kids and has sparked a idea in me, my goal is to change the playgrounds around our neighborhood and cities from the mundane plastic monoculture they are now a natural free flowing playground that uses natural materials like logs, rocks anything from the surrounding environment. It's time for a change and this book made me realize it.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Another great Louv read, May 29, 2011
This review is from: The Nature Principle: Human Restoration and the End of Nature-Deficit Disorder (Hardcover)
Just as The Last Child in the Woods ignited by passion for re-connecting kids with nature, The Nature Principle is likewise challenging me and exciting me for the future, especially as a designer. Louv writes with humor and modesty but at the same time offers up challenges for all of us to look at and treat the world differently.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 25 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

Details

The Nature Principle: Human Restoration and the End of Nature-Deficit Disorder
$24.95 $17.02
In Stock
Add to cart Add to wishlist
Search these reviews only
Send us feedback How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you? Let us know here.