Buy Used
$0.08
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Good | Details
Sold by Books Squared
Condition: :
Comment: Only lightly used. Book has minimal wear to cover and binding. A few pages may have small creases and minimal underlining. Book selection as BIG as Texas.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Neoconservative Vision: From the Cold War to the Culture Wars Paperback – September 1, 1997


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$40.00 $0.08

Best Books of the Year
See the Best Books of 2014
Looking for something great to read? Browse our editors' picks for 2014's Best Books of the Year in fiction, nonfiction, mysteries, children's books, and much more.
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 368 pages
  • Publisher: Madison Books (September 1, 1997)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1568331002
  • ISBN-13: 978-1568331003
  • Product Dimensions: 5.6 x 0.8 x 8.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 2.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,799,382 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Contrary to widespread belief, neoconservatives generally support the welfare state as providing an essential safety net, though neocons such as Irving Kristol and Michael Novak want to restructure welfare programs in order to limit bureaucracy, maximize personal autonomy and discourage a cycle of dependency. This viewpoint emerges from Gerson's survey of neoconservative thought, based on his interviews with Kristol, Novak, Norman Podhoretz, James Q. Wilson, William Buckley Jr., Midge Decter, Gertrude Himmelfarb, Richard John Neuhaus, Joshua Muravchik and other leading neo- and old-line conservatives. Despite a wide diversity of opinions, there is much common ground; neoconservatives oppose affirmative action; they regard capitalism as essential to economic and moral prosperity and view communist systems as evil; pro-choice neoconservatives think abortion is wrong and should be stringently regulated and discouraged, while many Catholic neocons go further, opposing legalized abortion, which they regard as murder. Even readers who disagree with neoconservative philosophy will find much to ponder in Gerson's thoughtful intellectual history.
Copyright 1995 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Review

Readers who wish to learn more about the neoconservative movement should turn to Gerson's excellent, informative history. (Library Journal)

Gerson has written an invaluable guide to a group—the neoconservative intellectuals—that confuses and irritates both paleo-conservatives and left-liberals. (Robert K. Bork, American Enterprise Institute for Public Policy Research)

A definitive work of scholarship. (David Frum, The New Republic)

The best play-by-play account to date of the neocons' ferocious battles with the dominant (liberal) culture. (The Wall Street Journal)

A serious, well-written and well-researched book about an important subject. (The New Republic)

Even readers who disagree with neoconservative philosophy will find much to ponder in Gerson's thoughtful intellectual history. (Publishers Weekly)

Customer Reviews

2.8 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By S. Koropeckyj on June 2, 2004
Format: Paperback
Whether you are a liberal or a conservative should have no basis for whether or not you liked or disliked this book. If you are a liberal, there is plenty to learn about the traitors to the right and if you are an old conservative you can learn about the right's relatively new allies, or if you are a neo-con you can learn plenty about the movement that you claim to be a part of. This book provides more than enough information about everything neoconservative. However the books failing comes in the way that the information was presented. It is very obvious that Gerson was an inexperienced writer when he wrote this book, still being in graduate school. The rhetoric that he uses is unimaginative and overall sometimes painful to read. He employs constant use of sentence fragments and other grammer-nazi anathemas.
However the books biggest failing is simple: it is often very hard to connect two events in the book. Now bear with me here, this is a bit hard to explain. Basically the first hundred or so pages are about liberal anti-communists, now as you may or may not know the liberal anti-communists are those that would later become the neo-conservative movement. Then he says that the liberal anti-communists abandonned the left. He writes a total of 5 or 6 pages about this. Basically he doesn't provide many concrete reasons for the switch or how the switch occured. He merely said that it happened and I was only able to discern this based on the bolded titles of the two sections that dealt with the conversion.
Thus although this book is very informative about some things about the new conservative movement, it muddles some of the most important events and is written in an amateurish, aspiring tongue.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Lady on December 29, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book is painfully tedious to read, though I may not be an out of touch, ivory tower intellectual scheming behind closed university doors on how to bring democracy to the world through the barrel of a gun in order to impose my products on them. Like other neocons, Gerson is now capitalizing on his ideas by connecting contacts to new markets, forged through blood baths. Gerson is a terrible writer -- there is very little new or intersting in this book, which cannot be acquired elsewhere -- as a reviewer said, on the web for free. I would read the Nation's "Men from JINSA" to understand the movement or even Al Regnery's Upstream, which places the neoconservative movement within the context of the wider conservative movement. This book reads like a poorly written PhD thesis, which was sloppily put together after a night of partying by a self-important twit who was convinced of his superiority and genius by virtue of belonging or somehow finding membership in the neocon movement. This book was written to cement Gerson's neocon ties/credentials to help promote his future financial aspirations. The five star review(s) -- both by the same person, were probably written by Gerson himself, or Bill Kristol, or some other neocon punk who enjoys this pedantic, poorly written drivel.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Dr. Henry Lloyd on January 16, 2004
Format: Paperback
The access and interviews that Gerson got are moderately impressive, but the trade-off is that there is little origional or interesting in this collection. You can find similer content on the web for free, that is what I suggest you do instead of buying this book.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
13 of 25 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 28, 1999
Format: Paperback
Communism is bad. Any movement that begins there is headed in the right direction. Since it began with that simple proposition a few decades back, the neoconservative movement has had more influence on the political landscape than most of us realize. Many conservatives of differing sorts may think of the neoconservatives as a small cadre of northeastern Jewish intellectuals irrelevant to other forms conservatism, or may not think of them at all, but will learn when reading Mark Gerson's book just how much other brands of conservatism should credit the neocons for shaping their theories and paving the way for the resurgence of genuine conservatism in America. Mark Gerson set out to write a book about great thinkers like Irving Kristol and Norman Podhoretz, and in doing so has put his name on a level with theirs.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
8 of 20 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on April 24, 1999
Format: Hardcover
Mark Gerson has illuminated an intellectual movement that carries the promise of freedom from the worn out structures of both traditional liberalism and conservatism. By capturing the essence of neoconservatism in a clearly written volume, he has done a great service to American political thought.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.