Engineering & Transportation
The Net Effect: Romanticism, Capitalism, and the Internet and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 6 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
The Net Effect: Romantici... has been added to your Cart
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Like New | Details
Condition: Used: Like New
Comment: Only slightly differentiated from a new book. Undamaged cover and spine. Pages may display light wear but no marks. Help save a tree. Buy all your used books from Green Earth Books. Read. Recycle and Reuse.
Sell yours for a Gift Card
We'll buy it for $2.00
Learn More
Trade in now
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

The Net Effect: Romanticism, Capitalism, and the Internet (Critical Cultural Communication) Paperback – December 8, 2010


See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$25.00
$17.69 $9.71

Roads and Ecological Infrastructure by
Roads and Ecological Infrastructure
Conceptual and practical, this book will influence the next decade or more of road design in ecologically sensitive areas and should prevent countless unnecessary wildlife fatalities. Learn more | See similar books
$25.00 FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Only 6 left in stock (more on the way). Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

The Net Effect: Romanticism, Capitalism, and the Internet (Critical Cultural Communication) + Human-Built World: How to Think about Technology and Culture (science.culture)
Price for both: $36.32

Buy the selected items together

Editorial Reviews

Review

“One part palm reader and one part politico, Streeter makes total sense of the Internet: its 60s roots, its 90s ethos, and why it works and feels the way it does today. Whether or not you remember firsthand what a long strange trip it’s been, The Net Effect will persuade you with its lucid rendering of the shared experiences, strange bedfellows, and stealth mythologies that have shaped what it means to be online.”

-Lisa Gitelman,NYU, and author of Always, Already New: Media, History, and the Data of Culture



“‘We are romantics even, and perhaps especially, in the face of high technologies,’ writes Thomas Streeter. In his profound and illuminating analysis of the interactions between technology and desire, Streeter shows how conflicting visions of the internet have not so much reflected the pre-given triumph of a new technology as shaped the possibilities and limitations of who we are and who we might become.”
-Peter Stallybrass,University of Pennsylvania



"The Net Effect is an excellent resource for anyone reseraching the influence of society on technology."
-CHOICE

"The Net Effect makes a great contribution to our knowledge on the question of labor in Internet technology."-International Journal of Communciation

About the Author

Thomas Streeter is Professor of Sociology at the University of Vermont. He is the author of Selling the Air: A Critique of the Policy of Commercial Broadcasting in the United States.

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Shop the New Digital Design Bookstore
Check out the Digital Design Bookstore, a new hub for photographers, art directors, illustrators, web developers, and other creative individuals to find highly rated and highly relevant career resources. Shop books on web development and graphic design, or check out blog posts by authors and thought-leaders in the design industry. Shop now

Product Details

  • Series: Critical Cultural Communication
  • Paperback: 240 pages
  • Publisher: NYU Press (December 8, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0814741169
  • ISBN-13: 978-0814741160
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 0.5 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 2.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,379,490 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Thomas Streeter (http://www.uvm.edu/~tstreete) teaches at the University of Vermont, and studies media, technology, law, and culture. He studies the soft side of hard issues, that is, the role of cultural beliefs in shaping things like institutions, property, legal regulation, and technology. From radio broadcasting to the internet, the adoption, use, and even the constitution of new technological systems are often influenced, not just by economic and structural factors, but by cultural trends and habits of belief.

His award-winning Selling the Air, a study of the cultural underpinnings of the creation of the US broadcast industry, was published in 1996. He edited, with Zephyr Teachout, a volume about the use of the internet in Howard Dean's run for President, called Mousepads, Shoe Leather, and Hope, published in 2007. The Net Effect: Romanticism, Capitalism, and the Internet, came out in December, 2010.

Customer Reviews

2.5 out of 5 stars
5 star
0
4 star
1
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
1
See both customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Mary J. on December 21, 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Streeter does an excellent job of weaving together the ideas, cultures, and individuals that came together to create the Internet. The story begins in the 1960's when computers were quite large (room or building size) and were financed by the US government for military purposes. These military goals and massive funding from DARPA intersected with the computer science counter-culture in the Bay Area (hippies from San Francisco, tech firms from Silicon Valley). The intersection of these two unlikely forces - military money and counter-culture values - came together to create the Internet of today. In the 1970s commercial firms also began to play a large role as the market for computers grew, first as an office efficiency tool.

Despite his rich use of history, the book has a couple of drawbacks. Streeter does not bring his history into the present day, stopping at the open source movement of the 1990's. Also, I found the sections on romanticism and the computer to be forced. It may be possible to use the ideas of Byron and Emerson to illuminate the social meaning of computers, but Streeter does not do so convincingly in this book. It is a strong intellectual history of computing, and Streeter should have left it at that.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 25 people found the following review helpful By Marcelo Trasel on March 28, 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I have bought the Kindle edition of Streeter's book and found, to my utter dismay, that the publisher imposes a limit on clippings. Wouldn't it be nice if Amazon warned readers about the limiting in the book info? In fact, I haven't seem anything about clipping limits in Kindle's user guide, webpage or FAQ.

When I trade money for something, I assume that something becomes my property, and I may do whatever I fancy with it. For example, the printed version of Streeter's book lends itself to limiteless annotating and clipping, sharing with friends, etc.

Also, this is an academic book, and academic books are expected to be severely annotated. If it was a new volume of Percy Jackson's exploits, or a new Sidney Sheldon best-seller, imposing clipping limits would make sense. Not in the case of Streeter, I'm afraid.

That's a shame, for "The Net Effect" is an original, insightful and solid analysis of the impact of the Internet and computing technology in the Western Society. Five-star content, unfortunately packaged in one-star DRM.
5 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more
The Net Effect: Romanticism, Capitalism, and the Internet (Critical Cultural Communication)
This item: The Net Effect: Romanticism, Capitalism, and the Internet (Critical Cultural Communication)
Price: $25.00
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com
Want to discover more products? Check out this page to see more: one click ordering on amazon