The Neurology of Angels and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy Used
$5.31
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Good | Details
Sold by amitcj
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Buy with confidence. Excellent Customer Service & Return policy.We ship Daily.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

The Neurology of Angels Perfect Paperback – August 29, 2008


See all 4 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Perfect Paperback
"Please retry"
$12.55 $5.31
12%20Days%20of%20Deals%20in%20Books
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Hero Quick Promo
12 Days of Kindle Book Deals
Load your library with Amazon's editors' picks, $2.99 or less each today only. Learn more

Product Details

  • Perfect Paperback: 284 pages
  • Publisher: Friction Publishing (August 29, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0981880304
  • ISBN-13: 978-0981880303
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 0.6 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 14.4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (13 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,167,446 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
5 star
6
4 star
5
3 star
2
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 13 customer reviews
Her characters are well-developed and empathetic.
D. Salerni
Galen is a neurologist turned reluctant biotech entrepreneur who gives up everything to develop a cure for stroke.
Midwest Book Review
Emotions arise ranging from, love, frustration, helplessness, sadness and anger.
Sheri A. Wilkinson

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Michael Erisman on September 15, 2008
Format: Perfect Paperback
I read this book rather quickly because the story was so engaging and well written. I often read on the elliptical machine while working out and I kept adding minutes to finish the book which is high praise indeed. The premise of the book is based on how a new drug is brought to market and the politics behind how the drug companies use profits for research v. how the costs of these drugs impact the economic situation of those who need the drugs. While this is the premise, it is not in my opinion what the story is actually about.

The real story here was centered on the personal choices, intertwined family life, strained friendships and how we make hard decisions to prioritize the balance between our work and our family. The main character goes into medical research due to a loss of a loved one, and he is set on finding a cure for a rare neurological disorder. In the process he loses his family, as his wife leaves him and takes their daughter. I was in the middle of some very difficult personal family issues myself when reading and often found tears streaming down my face, in part because the pain and loss is so well depicted, and then obviously because it struck such a strong chord with me.

I do not want to spoil the rest of the story, because it is a very good one. The issues are well documented, including the medical research (or at least I assume they were not being a neurological scientist) and the political framing. I recommend the book highly as an emotional and touching depiction of choices and love and as a great backdrop for an important debate on health care.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Sylvia Wadlington on September 1, 2008
Format: Perfect Paperback
The Neurology of Angels by Krista Tibbs is primarily a story about people trying to do the right thing and not succeeding. The importance of more writers creating this type of story cannot be overstated. The really big problems of today have few Hollywood thrills, evil menaces or handsome heroes; they are wrought with ordinary people that are all trying to do what's right. Stories like this that entertain, educate and enlighten help enormously in solving these problems, because after reading them you can actually see what the problem is. The true villains in this story are fear and ignorance, fear of the trying new ways to tackle old problems and the ignorance of what can be accomplished by changing how things are done.
What makes it refreshing is the author actually does the math and tells how much it costs in labor and dollars to save the lives of children with rare diseases and dares to offer an idea that is "out of the box" and could possibly help some of them. Another important aspect of this story is that it clearly shows that traditional approaches will not solve our healthcare problems and we need a lot more bright people working on "out of the box", solutions. Sixty thousand dollars for an injection that allows one child to live another four months makes it appallingly clear that just throwing money at these problems is not going to solve them.
This story works through the struggles that pit parents, politicians and researchers against each other, yet surprisingly, it is a feel good book. The characters are flawed, but each want desperately to save the children and they are likable and real. The problems they face are clearly illustrated, and they are the same problems that touch everyone confronted by illness and disease.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Midwest Book Review on September 2, 2008
Format: Perfect Paperback
Suppose you had enough resources to make possible the cure for Leukemia or the cure for Alzheimer's -- but not both. Which one would you choose? Drawing upon her academic research and her experiences working for the Executive Office of the President in Washing, DC, her degrees in neuroscience and business, and her current profession in clinical research in the biotechnology industry, author Krista Tibbs has written "The Neurology Of Angels", a novel that provides fascinating insights into the process of drug development from the perspective of three professionals in a marathon race to save a life. Galen is a neurologist turned reluctant biotech entrepreneur who gives up everything to develop a cure for stroke. Eddy is a devoted father who enters politics on a mission to lower the cost of prescription drugs. Elizabeth is a pharmaceutical industry lawyer who is raising a daughter with a rare and fatal genetic illness. Their lives become forever entwined as the three parents engage in a tug-of-war over the failing system of good intentions which is our contemporary American health industry. What Krista Tubbs has accomplished through her novel is to lay out with vivid clarity the real-world issues facing national health care today where competing interests clash, where market forces and governmental policies collide, and where good people from differing perspectives find themselves having to make life and death decisions constrained by forces beyond their control. Superbly written from first page to last, "The Neurology Of Angels" is highly recommended reading (especially for anyone with an interest in contemporary health care issues) and a welcome addition to community library collections.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Jennifer Osterman on August 29, 2009
Format: Kindle Edition
I think this is a book that everyone should read in light of current politics. The story is reminiscent of Michael Crichton's works: a story told to dramatize an area of science in which real and ethical decisions are made every day. In this case, that area is US healthcare system. I think that Ms. Tibbs provides a compelling analysis of an area of health care that many people agree needs reform, but that is complex enough that many people don't fully realize how difficult and far-reaching those changes need to be. We essentially follow a drug from conception to testing to FDA approval to use, and uncover the process and stumbling blocks along the way. In an era of much needed discussions of health care reform, this book raises interesting questions through the actions of engaging characters and an interesting (though slightly contrived) plot. I find Ms. Tibbs' viewpoint comes through in this book in an instructional but not preachy or overbearing way.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews