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The New Adventures of Sherlock Holmes Paperback – September 21, 1999


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 384 pages
  • Publisher: Carroll & Graf; 1 edition (September 21, 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0786706988
  • ISBN-13: 978-0786706983
  • Product Dimensions: 8.8 x 5.9 x 1.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,547,296 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

An absolute must for fans celebrating Holmes's centennial, this is also a first-rate collection of new stories that could serve nicely as an introduction to the famous sleuth. There isn't a bad tale in these 15although purists may balk at Loren D. Estleman's "Dr. and Mrs. Watson At Home," a snippy playlet, and at the rather nerdy Watson who narrates Joyce Harrington's "The Adventure of the Gowanus Abduction." Most of the stories are affectionate, accurate pastiches of the originals. Among the best are Dorothy B. Hughes's "Sherlock Holmes and the Muffin," and Stephen King's "The Doctor's Case," which keeps the old form while allowing the mystery to be solved by Watson, with a lovely twist at the end. "The House That Jack Built" by Edward Wellen is an hallucinogenic tour de force of a puzzle that revives Moriarty, with a startling idea about the real nature of that "Napoleon of crime." Michael Harrison's "Sherlock Holmes and 'The Woman' " identifies Irene Adler as Lillie Langtry in a brilliant now-it-can-be-told style from a nonegenarian Watson. A splendid addition to Holmesiana, worthy of its honoree. Period illustrations not seen by PW. 25,000 first printing; Mystery Guild main selection.
Copyright 1987 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Library Journal

To mark the 100th anniversary of the first appearance in print of Sherlock Holmes, the estate of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle has authorized an official book of new short stories, written by 16 British and American authors, including John Gardner and Stephen King. Among the more effective and successful tales are those that adopt the time frame and style of the originals, e.g., Stuart Kaminsky's "The Final Toast" and Barry Jones's "The Shadows on the Lawn." Stories with a modern setting offer a further extension of the Holmes mystique. Entertaining reading for fans of Conan Doyle. Lydia Burruel Johnson, Mesa P.L., Ariz.
Copyright 1987 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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13 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Jack Maybrick on December 22, 2002
Format: Paperback
Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's acquired disdain for his own renowned detective creation is legendary, and `tis said that when William Gillette wired him with the question, "May I marry Holmes?" (to a female character), Conan Doyle brusquely replied, "You may marry him or murder him or do what you like with him."
But one must draw the line somewhere. And notwithstanding Mollie Hardwick's excellent paean to the legend of Sherlock Holmes at the head of this collection of short stories, I wonder whether even Conan Doyle could have stomached some of these literary assaults upon it.
In "Sherlock Holmes and the Muffin", Dorothy Hughes presents us with a feminist Holmes and Watson who look forward to the day when women become doctors and scientists. Another swig of Women 100 Proof and Ms. Hughes would have had them lobbying from their 19th century perches for abortion on demand, free daycare, and a chocolate bar in the glove compartment of every SUV, a bottle of prozac in the pocket of every power suit.
And even THIS atrocity barely holds its own, as an atrocity, against the contemporary setting of Joyce Harrington's "The Adventure of the Gowanus Abduction", in which a delicate hippie-type Watson plays second fiddle to a ferocious liberated female Holmes - not only as "her" assistant but as "her " lover. Indeed, the story winds up with a broad hint of a rendezvous in the bedroom, but I think that this Watson will couple with this Holmes about as successfully as Tchaikovsky did with Antonina Milyukova.
This book also has its share of short stories that do considerably more justice to the Sherlockian tradition, and the best of these are Barry Jones's "The Shadows on the Lawn", Edward D. Hoch's "The Return of the Speckled Band", and Stuart Kaminsky's "The Final Toast".
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7 of 9 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on April 28, 2000
Format: Paperback
"The New Adventures of Sherlock Holmes" was like a breath of fresh air. Lately I have come across some anthologies which just aren't up to par as far as the quality of the plots. These stories I found to be entertaining and fun to read. Two which stood out for me were "Shadows on the Lawn" and "The Return of the Speckled Band". There's even a story in there for Watson lovers, "The Doctor's Case", penned by none other than Stephen King. Though there were a few which I didn't really care for, this is a worthwhile read.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on August 7, 2001
Format: Paperback
I love anything about Holmes and Watson. These were well written stories that I truly enjoyed reading. It took me back to when I read all of Doyle's stories about Holmes and Watson. I recommend it highly.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Acute Observer on November 24, 2012
Format: Paperback
The New Adventures of Sherlock Holmes, Ed. Greenberg

This 1987 book was authorized by Dame Jean Conan Doyle, the daughter and heir of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, on the 100th anniversary of "A Study in Scarlet". The stories created a standard for detective stories that solved crimes through observed clues. The stories in this book were created to pay tribute to Doyle's characters. The last three stories were added for this edition in 1999. These are the titles of each chapter and their authors. You should have first read "The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes" and "The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes" before reading this book.

01) The Infernal Machine, John Lutz
02) The Final Toast, Stuart M. Kaminsky
03) The Phantom Chamber, Gary Alan Ruse
04) The Return of the Speckled Band, Edward D. Hoch
05) The Adventure of the Unique Holmes, Jon L. Breen
06) Sherlock Holmes and "The Woman", Michael Harrison

07) The Shadows on the Lawn, Barry Jones
08) The Adventure of the Gowanus Abduction, Joyce Harrington
09) Dr. and Mrs. Watson at Home, Loren D. Estleman
10) The Two Footmen, Michael Gilbert
11) Sherlock Holmes and the Muffin, Dorothy B. Hughes
12) The Curious Computer, Peter Lovesey

13) The Adventure of the Persistent Marksman, Lillian de la Torre
14) The House that Jack Built, Edward Wellen
15) The Doctor's Case, Stephen King
16) The Second Treaty, Daniel Stashower
17) The Adventure of the Venomous Lizard, Bill Crider
18) Hostage to Fortune, Anne Perry

The Afterword tells about "Moriarity and the Real Underworld", the character from "The Final Problem". Moriarity is the respectable man who controls the criminal class. [Is this a subtle reference to a ruling class?
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By Acute Observer on November 24, 2012
Format: Hardcover
The New Adventures of Sherlock Holmes, Ed. Greenberg

This 1987 book was authorized by Dame Jean Conan Doyle, the daughter and heir of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, on the 100th anniversary of "A Study in Scarlet". The stories created a standard for detective stories that solved crimes through observed clues. The stories in this book were created to pay tribute to Doyle's characters. The last three stories were added for this edition in 1999. These are the titles of each chapter and their authors. You should have first read "The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes" and "The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes" before reading this book.

01) The Infernal Machine, John Lutz
02) The Final Toast, Stuart M. Kaminsky
03) The Phantom Chamber, Gary Alan Ruse
04) The Return of the Speckled Band, Edward D. Hoch
05) The Adventure of the Unique Holmes, Jon L. Breen
06) Sherlock Holmes and "The Woman", Michael Harrison

07) The Shadows on the Lawn, Barry Jones
08) The Adventure of the Gowanus Abduction, Joyce Harrington
09) Dr. and Mrs. Watson at Home, Loren D. Estleman
10) The Two Footmen, Michael Gilbert
11) Sherlock Holmes and the Muffin, Dorothy B. Hughes
12) The Curious Computer, Peter Lovesey

13) The Adventure of the Persistent Marksman, Lillian de la Torre
14) The House that Jack Built, Edward Wellen
15) The Doctor's Case, Stephen King
16) The Second Treaty, Daniel Stashower
17) The Adventure of the Venomous Lizard, Bill Crider
18) Hostage to Fortune, Anne Perry

The Afterword tells about "Moriarity and the Real Underworld", the character from "The Final Problem". Moriarity is the respectable man who controls the criminal class. [Is this a subtle reference to a ruling class?
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
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