Customer Reviews


6 Reviews
5 star:
 (3)
4 star:
 (1)
3 star:
 (2)
2 star:    (0)
1 star:    (0)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favorable review
The most helpful critical review


22 of 23 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Lucid, comprehensive and balanced
Given the speed with which the situation has continued changing in Egypt, Bahrain, Yemen, Syria and the remainder of the Arab world, it is inevitable that any book covering the events there will be outdated even as it is being written. This volume, which is astute and admirably balanced, will be of value for some time to come, though, in no small part because of its...
Published on May 21, 2011 by George Robinson

versus
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Current Arab Spring
There are quite a few reasonably good articles. However, there is much repeating of the old mind-set re the West help generate it. This attitude needs to be discarded in favor of Islamic undercurrents responsible for it.
Published on December 26, 2011 by Siraj I. Mufti


Most Helpful First | Newest First

22 of 23 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Lucid, comprehensive and balanced, May 21, 2011
By 
George Robinson (New York, NY USA) - See all my reviews
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
Given the speed with which the situation has continued changing in Egypt, Bahrain, Yemen, Syria and the remainder of the Arab world, it is inevitable that any book covering the events there will be outdated even as it is being written. This volume, which is astute and admirably balanced, will be of value for some time to come, though, in no small part because of its compendiousness. By focussing a lot of its attention on the public record and turning to long-time observers of the region, The New Arab Revolt guarantees that it will continue to be useful to both specialists and general readers for some time to come.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Invitation to follow the dramatic events unfolding in the Middle East, July 10, 2011
By 
Didaskalex "Eusebius Alexandrinus" (Kellia on Calvary, Carolinas, USA) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
This review is from: The New Arab Revolt: What Happened, What It Means, and What Comes Next (Paperback)
****
"Liberals tend to be coteries who like whisky and the west but the masses incline towards men in beards" -- David Gardner, Last Chance: the Middle East in the Balance

"For generations the Arab populations had bartered away their political freedom for economic protection. They rose in rebellion when it dawned on them that the bargain had not worked, that the system of subsidies, and the promise of equality held out by the autocrats, had proven a colossal failure," wrote Fouad Agami, describing the root cause of the Arab Revolt. Unprecedented convulsions across the Middle East, triggered by Tunisia and prompted by Egypt's historical leadership in war and peace, raised hopes and fears, with intellectuals around the world and left experts of political think tanks, with some dangerous alternatives from chaos to economic collapse.

It may turn out that, contrary to the opinion of David Gardner and many observers of the Middle East, secular liberals turn out to be more than just small coteries, but to influence much effective appeal to democracy. This seems to be the case in Egypt, revitalized peaceful 8th of July demonstration, and progressive Tunisia, but looks slightly harder in Libya and Yemen. It still sounds like wishful thinking, after six months of slow progress with many snags and debated decisions, which triggered random ups and downs. If, however, the democratic transition that we are now eager to see ends up bringing Islamist-centered governments to power, as was the case with Hamas, in Gaza strip.

Theocratic governed Iran, as the socialist driven experiments in Egypt, Syria, and Iraq were ardent critics of western notions of economic freedom and democratic equality. With a dictatorial theocratic rule of three decades in Iran, then what? Discontent with the Mullas regime in Iran was nationally manifest in 2009, when a rigged election brought massive crowds onto the streets, as was the case in Egypt, a year later. Despite Tehran's noisy claim of catalyzing the revolt across the region, said to be inspired by the Iranian revolution, three decades later, their brand of Theocratic Shiite Islamism does not sell well in the Sunni minds. The Arab revolt could more likely inspire Iranians to get rid of their oppressing regime.

"The New Arab Revolt," edited by The Council on Foreign Relations, attempts to persuade the American intellectuals to pay a closer attention to the dramatic events unfolding in the Middle East, and analyzes the best and worst case scenarios of the Arab Revolt. With a timely collection of about sixty articles, congressional testimonies, and interviews by experts on the Middle East. Bernard Lewis, Fouad Ajami, Richard Haass, Martin Indyk, lead a roster of thought leaders, to explore, analyze and evaluate different alternatives. The 500 page volume includes articles from Foreign Affairs media, and primary source documents, and major public statements by the main players, joined by Egyptian opposition writings.

Rock the Casbah: Rage and Rebellion Across the Islamic World
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Current Arab Spring, December 26, 2011
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: The New Arab Revolt: What Happened, What It Means, and What Comes Next (Paperback)
There are quite a few reasonably good articles. However, there is much repeating of the old mind-set re the West help generate it. This attitude needs to be discarded in favor of Islamic undercurrents responsible for it.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A great explanation of the Arab Revolt!, June 8, 2011
By 
John C. Navarra (Daytona Beach, Florida) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: The New Arab Revolt: What Happened, What It Means, and What Comes Next (Paperback)
I trust the Council on Foreign Relations to always provide me with good information on world affairs. The Arab Revolt is a combination of Foreign Affairs publication articles and blogs. Often political blogs today are opinion pieces that attempt to make who the author likes to look intelligent and who they don't like to look foolish. CFR writers are scholars who provide good reliable information. If your looking for true policy wonks to explain foreign policy to you, CFR is a good choice.

John Navarra
Daytona Beach, Florida
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3.0 out of 5 stars Not very much Haass, February 6, 2013
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
I should have previewed it. I was expecting the insights of Richard Haass but I found a compilation of essays that were somewhat dated. Still a lot of good info, just not what I was looking for
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The NewArab Review, December 11, 2011
By 
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: The New Arab Revolt: What Happened, What It Means, and What Comes Next (Paperback)
An excellent read -well worth it. I teach the subject and will recommend it to my students Neil Lazarus twitter:@awesomeseminars
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


Most Helpful First | Newest First

Details

The New Arab Revolt: What Happened, What It Means, and What Comes Next
The New Arab Revolt: What Happened, What It Means, and What Comes Next by Council on Foreign Relations/Foreign Affairs (Paperback - April 27, 2011)
$19.95 $13.61
In Stock
Add to cart Add to wishlist
Search these reviews only
Send us feedback How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you? Let us know here.