Buy New
$20.77
Qty:1
  • List Price: $23.95
  • Save: $3.18 (13%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
The New Radicalism in Ame... has been added to your Cart
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The New Radicalism in America 1889-1963: The Intellectual as a Social Type Paperback – December 17, 1997


See all 8 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$20.77
$16.59 $0.01
Mass Market Paperback
"Please retry"
$0.01



Editorial Reviews

Review

Extraordinarily creative . . . an important and engrossing contribution to a complex and elusive subject. -- Newsweek

About the Author

Christopher Lasch (1932–1994) was also the author of The True and Only Heaven, The Revolt of the Elites and the Betrayal of Democracy, and other books.
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Image
Looking for the Audiobook Edition?
Tell us that you'd like this title to be produced as an audiobook, and we'll alert our colleagues at Audible.com. If you are the author or rights holder, let Audible help you produce the audiobook: Learn more at ACX.com.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 384 pages
  • Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company (December 17, 1997)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0393316963
  • ISBN-13: 978-0393316964
  • Product Dimensions: 0.6 x 0.1 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 13.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,392,134 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

14 of 15 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on March 10, 1999
Format: Paperback
In light of the "cultural turn" in the human sciences which has so frazzled many of us who subscribed to the "old" distribution of intellectual labor in the university, Christopher Lasch's early study of the "left"--in many ways the book which began his lifelong engagement with issues pertinent to the proper and actual character of the Progressive cause--provides a new depth to what has so self-consciously flaunted its "newness," its "Post-whateverness." His thesis is that around the turn of the century the "radical" developed a new self-consciousness, and that this posture manifested itself in "cultural" radicalism whose politics was no longer confined to political economy, but which psychologized social issues and personal "artistic" experience. His biographical-vignette approach is especially effective at driving forward the themes, though it weakens his own argument--weak of the whole on what the ancients called "refutatio." I think his periodization is a little too cute and pat. The importance of 1963 is clear; 1889 is never satisfactorily developed and the reader must accept this date as if a revelation. This arbitrariness aside, Lasch has a keen descriptive eye--his dissections of Schlesinger and Mailer are particularly droll--and clean prose style throughout. For all its flaws, this book earns itself a hearty recommendation.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
20 of 25 people found the following review helpful By Panopticonman on November 2, 2002
Format: Paperback
Lasch's "The New Radicalism in America," published in 1965 tells the history of radicalism in America through a series of portraits of well-chosen individuals. Some, such as Jane Addams and Walter Lippmann are still relatively well known, others such as Mabel Luhan Dodge, Lincoln Steffens, Colonel House, and Randolph Bourne as less well-remembered. Part of the appeal of this approach is the how Lasch positions and contrasts these leading and lesser lights within the context of the social and cultural movements they led, followed, or reported upon.
Lasch, the son-in-law of the liberal American historian Henry Commager, belonged to the post WWII generation of historians which searched for more objective ways to tell history than the progressive historians and writers such as Parrington and Croly, and the generation immediately afterwards, for example, Commager. Best known for his "The Culture of Narcissism," the "New Radicalism in America" is the work of a young historian attempting a critique of the grand, sweeping style of earlier generations, and to tell a story of a rise of a new class of personage on the public stage in America: the intellectual.
The intellectual in America rose out of the ashes of Victorianism. Its earliest avatars came from the bourgeoisie, appalled at the stifling, stunted one-dimensional roles assigned to their parents: the father as breadwinner, the predatory male who proved his fitness in the Spencerian business world, the mother who stayed home to create a haven in a heartless world for her husband and children, and who, as such was the arbiter of Victorian genteel culture and the inculcator of the social graces.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Paperback
Two major points about Lasch's book:

1) It's about the doctrinal disputes among liberals at the end of the 19th century.

2) Every 'intellectual' observed was, according to Lasch, a product of 'middle-class' affluence.

Lasch's radicals, Addams, Bourne, Luhan, (late) Lippmann, John Dewey and the rest are studied primarily in their relation to the cultural, artistic norms of the period, and are then later situated in reference to the great liberal confusion generated by WW1. All were university educated and only one was a professional academic. Lasch easily shows how the culture mongers among them were utter dilettantes, Addams especially. Prior to her awakening, Addams reads novels, goes to Europe, cultures herself and talks about beauty, all in the supreme dilettante manner of Oscar Wilde. Her Christianism impeded any potential seriousness with this cultural undertaking, and she recoils in horror when finally understanding that great culture requires great discrimination, after which she retreats to resolute Christianism and social service. Any real reader of Nietzsche will see the parallels.

The radicals are considered 'radical' because of how they differed from the period's main liberalism. That liberalism, or stage in liberalism, was, as Lasch shows, mainly 'political' and non-cultural, non-artistic, non-identity, unlike our time. I've noticed that Lasch is a descriptive writer and so sometimes doesn't take words seriously enough. 'Politics' here, for this outmoded liberalism, is the skeleton of the beast, concerning itself merely with elections, representation, and a very innocent idea of universal humanitarianism. In other words, it's anti-political.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 85 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on May 19, 1999
Format: Paperback
I see no reason for anyone to waste any time on this book or on Lasch. Those of us challenging contemporary paradigms have had to endure a lot of hypocritical criticism lately, and Lasch is really not so different from other clueless white males who used to refer to themselves as left before jumping ship and swimming to the right. The reason that the contemporary unviersity course of study in the humanities favors individual experience and expression is because white heterosexist patriarchy has denied us this expression in the past. It is the structuring of Difference that has finally received some attention, instead of the usual empty and dry western civ type of stuff. I am proud to be a radical interrogating paradigms and subverting other people's dearest assumptions. Who needs a tiresome white male like Lasch whining about how radicalism has departed from his narrow-minded "principles"?
6 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Frequently Bought Together

The New Radicalism in America 1889-1963: The Intellectual as a Social Type + The True and Only Heaven: Progress and Its Critics + The Revolt of the Elites and the Betrayal of Democracy
Price for all three: $60.72

Buy the selected items together