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The New School: How the Information Age Will Save American Education from Itself Hardcover – January 7, 2014


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The New School: How the Information Age Will Save American Education from Itself + The Higher Education Bubble (Encounter Broadside) + The K-12 Implosion (Encounter Broadside)
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 112 pages
  • Publisher: Encounter Books (January 7, 2014)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1594037108
  • ISBN-13: 978-1594037108
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 6.1 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (45 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #268,490 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Glenn Harlan Reynolds is the Beauchamp Brogan Distinguished Professor of Law at the University of Tennessee. He blogs at InstaPundit.com and writes for such publications as The Atlantic, Forbes, Popular Mechanics, The Wall Street Journal, and USA Today. He lives in Knoxville, TN.

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Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
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See all 45 customer reviews
This book was very easy to understand and very thoroughly researched.
Carl L. Sawyer
I find the solutions suggested for higher education to be much more palatable than the status quo - so, to borrow a phrase, let's roll!
Wilfrid Nixon
All in all the book is great if you haven't read much at all about the changes that might be coming in education.
M. C. ALLEN

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

42 of 43 people found the following review helpful By Johnny & Riza on January 5, 2014
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Heh. A blogger known for his brevity produces a substantive view of both K-12 and higher education -- in 103 pages.

I had read both of his Broadside books. Between that and reading Instapundit, many of the ideas in The New School are familiar. But I would still highly recommend buying a copy for yourself and one to pass around to parents you know and any open minded teachers.

Reynolds is an expert on the topic as he is Beauchamp Brogan Distinguished Professor of Law at the University of Tennessee, married to PhD Psychologist Dr. Helen Smith, yet the perspective of New School is much more about his role as a consumer of education for their daughter and for the bloggers' desire to assemble elements into social and political patterns. The joy of the book is its academic cred without the academic's diffidence (or turgid prose...)

I don't think I need post a spoiler alert that there are problems in education. But it is a huge, complicated, interconnected system with the distortions of more than a hundred years of government involvement. It is easy to choose one failed facet (for me it is Teachers' Unions) to hang all the deficiencies upon. New School broadens the concerns and adds significant new concepts.

Reynolds's Instapundit writings cherish modernity, and the "New" part of the "The New School" is to rescue 21st Century students from a 19th Century Prussian model which was imported to train good 20th Century factory workers.

"On his return, [Horace] Mann extolled the Prussian model in his seventh annual report.
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17 of 17 people found the following review helpful By hodge001 on January 4, 2014
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
But imho he's right about everything else. This is a must read for parents, and it'll be a scary read for folks in the industrial/governmental educational complex. It's quick and concise, but packed with documented info and keen insights. The response he got from his dean, when he mentioned that he hadn't gotten as much flak as expected, was enlightening. "Everybody knows there's a problem; they just don't want to talk about it because they don't know what to do about it, and they're afraid of what they might have to do if they did."

We're in uncharted territory here but, as the author says (with attribution), something that can't go on forever, won't. He doesn't offer a one size prescription, but acknowledges that there will be many possible solutions, based on the needs of the kid and resources of the parent. And now there are a much wider array of tools and resources available to us all. With apologies to Homer, I, for one, welcome our brave new school.
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16 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Kevin Currie-Knight TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on January 13, 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Glenn Harlan Reynolds, founder of Instapundit and writer of two other (brief) books on the necessity of education reform, has written a more comprehensive book explaining the how, why, and (kind of) the what next of the education bubble. Unlike some pundits, Reynolds suggests that there is a bubble not just in higher education, but in k-12 education too: a perfect storm of education becoming more expensive, the (economic) value of diplomas and degrees declining, and the technology that makes creating and using new educational forms more and more viable. As Reynolds likes to put it (in the words of economist Herbert Stein), "If something cannot go on forever, it will stop." And that is what he sees for both higher education and k-12.

Simply put, the education bubble - like any bubble - bursts when the cost of an investment begins to outweigh the likely return on investment. And, at this point, the cost of college degrees is proving to outweigh the rise in earning potential one gets by getting one. (And if anything, some have argued that increases in earning potential of college degrees owes more to the value of the certification - the degree itself - than the skills gained in obtaining the degree. So, what happens when employers start to question whether they are putting inflated value on the piece of paper and start hiring more people without degrees? Can you hear the bubble bursting?)

Oh, you say; well, education should be about personal growth and not increasing one's future earning potential? Well, sure, but not when it carries a five-figure price tag! (How many consumer services carry that steep a price... and still have willing consumers?) Or, maybe the government should subsidize more?
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14 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on January 12, 2014
Format: Kindle Edition
Glenn Reynolds is a constitutional lawyer and long-time blogger who works harder than just about anybody, and it shows in this book. He started writing about the "bubble" in higher education years ago, long before anybody else took up the cudgel, and more or less single-handedly moved the issue into the forefront of public attention.

His dissection of the ills currently afflicting American education is as sharp as one would expect from a highly-trained and talented legal mind, but his prescription for those afflictions could only come from an observer equally familiar with the potential offered by the myriad products of Moore's Law.

If you've been feeling depressed about the current state of American education, buy this book and read it. It is a hopeful take on a seemingly hopeless situation, and you're feel considerably more cheerful after reading it.
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