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The New Testament Documents: Are They Reliable? Paperback – April 2, 2003


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 149 pages
  • Publisher: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Company (April 2, 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0802822193
  • ISBN-13: 978-0802822192
  • Product Dimensions: 8.3 x 5.3 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (79 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #75,474 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"Yes, they are. And it took F. F. Bruce only 120 tiny pages to show it."

"The New Testament Documents ranks as one of the most quoted apologia for the Bible."

"This is a treasury of useful material. . . . There is clearly a need for such a handbook." --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Review

"Bruce was a tower of strength in the worlds of scholarship and faith, and in particular to those who, like him, were and are determined not to separate the two. . . . We should be profoundly thankful." --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

F. F. Bruce (1910-1990) was Rylands Professor of Biblical Criticism and Exegesis at the University of Manchester in England. During his distinguished career, he wrote more than forty bestselling commentaries and books, including several titles published by InterVarsity Press, A Mind for What Matters and Paul, Apostle of the Heart Set Free. He also served as general editor of The New International Commentary on the New Testament.

Customer Reviews

I recommend the book, just not this Kindle edition.
A. Sanchez
This line of reasoning, and many other arguments, make Bruce's short book a compelling read for anybody interested in this topic.
"guy-72"
F.F. Bruce is a highly respected New Testament scholar who wrote this very short text in 1943.
Bruce L. Bronoske Sr.

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

78 of 78 people found the following review helpful By Tawa Anderson on January 13, 2010
Verified Purchase
Bruce's work on New Testament reliability is concise, incisive, and persuasive. The content of this book is outstanding.

However, Wilder Publications 2009 printing of Bruce's classic work is absolutely appalling. I honestly cannot believe that a publisher sent this copy to press with the number of errors, misprints, spelling mistakes, etc. that are contained. I have not yet read a complete page that was error-free, and ALL of the errors I have come across so far would have been easily identifiable through the use of a proofreader. A couple of examples: page 10, talking about the timeline of Jesus' ministry, Bruce writes that Jesus' public ministry would have commenced in September or October, AD 27.1. The Wilder edition presents it as "September or October, AD a7.1". A few pages later, while discussing the closeness of the NT manuscript tradition to the time of Christ, Bruce compares it to other ancient writings. At the top of page 13, the Wilder edition presents Bruce as writing: "For Caesar's Gallic War (composed between 58 and 50 BC) there are several extant MSS, but only nine or ten are good, and the oldest is some goo years later than Caesar's day." I don't know how many years "goo" is, but I suspect that it is 800. There are a few regularly-recurring errors: the word "in" is presented as "m"; there are random quotation marks that do not belong; words run into one another without a space between them. Occasionally letters are missing from words (e.g. Matta an logia instead of Matthaean logia), and sometimes entire words are missing from sentences.

It appears that Wilder Publications ran an earlier edition of Bruce's work through a digital scanner, and sent the resulting copy directly to the printing press without ever running it by a proofreader.
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129 of 138 people found the following review helpful By "guy-72" on January 1, 2001
Format: Paperback
This book is a fantastic guide for any person, Christian or otherwise, who would like to understand the level of historical accuracy that can be found in the New Testament documents. In that Christianity is a religion whose truth claims are allegedly rooted in historical fact, it is key that the works through which we read of those "facts" be considered reliable. Bruce does a great job of doing just that. No historical account, regardless of reliability, can prove miraculous events. However, Bruce argues, if a work can be proven to be historically and culturally accurate with respect to most of its content, that document then becomes-on the whole-more compelling. Any historian would then need to take more seriously the author's questionable claims such as the miracles, and Christ as God and savior of humanity. For if an author can be shown to be reliable in all other aspects of his work, why should he lie with respect to the documentation of miracles? This line of reasoning, and many other arguments, make Bruce's short book a compelling read for anybody interested in this topic.
Several sections of this book stand out. Bruce provides an introductory discussion regarding how historians have arrived at different dates for the original writing of the NT books. That particular chapter thus demonstrates how soon after the actual events of the NT that those events were actually captured in written form. Also, he briefly explains how the different NT books came to be "canonized" during the first three centuries the Christian Church. Throughout the rest of this book, Bruce provides internal and external evidence that point to the historical reliability of the NT.
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30 of 31 people found the following review helpful By commandergil on April 23, 2011
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F. F. Bruce has written a magnificent book, certainly worth having in your library. Unfortunately Amazon chose to buy this book from a publisher who must employ illiterate non-English speaking typists or proof readers, because there is NO WAY a competent publicist could have ever produced such a horrible product. Nearly every page contains typos, misspellings, punctuation errors, or even weird numbers (example: g00 for 800?). I was going to give this to my son who is having difficulties regarding the legitimacy for the New Testament claims about Jesus. But as an English major in college he would not get past the first ten pages before rejecting the book. I enjoy Amazon and have bought many books from them, and will continue to do so in the future. But do yourself a big favor and buy this book from a different publisher. You will be sorry if you don't.
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21 of 22 people found the following review helpful By Dennis K. Gabos on December 21, 2010
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I am shocked by the reprint of this classic work-FULL of Typos and errors. Obviously Wilder Publications is a counterfeit company that scanned and OCRed the text and never proof read. This is plainly unreadable. Does Amazon do any Quality testing of products it sells. I will have to go to a reliable vendor to get this venerated text. I had to give this 1 star to complete the review- I meant 0/5 it is worthless. AMAZON should be embarrassed by this.
DGThe New Testament Documents: Are they Reliable?
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49 of 58 people found the following review helpful By Jack Turner VINE VOICE on March 25, 2003
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
F.F. Bruce is probably one of the finest New Testament scholars there ever was and possible there ever will be. Why? Because my New Testament Studies professor in college said so, despite disagreeing with every single conclusion Bruce ever made about authorship, dating, or importance of the various books of the New Testament, not because of a lack of scholarship or invalid arguments or data, but simply because he did not wish to have the same conclusions as Bruce. That says a lot for a scholar. In addition, the research he has done is superb and the writing style is sublime. You will see other New Testament authors go into lengthy discussions on dating alone, but Bruce somehow manages to condense his entire argument into something that will fit in your shirt pocket. That also says a lot, both for the man and the work. The fact that it is still so widely regarded among not only NT studies folks but laymen only further proves its staying power. However, despite its refreshing brevity, I do wish Bruce had taken the time to go into greater depth on the books themselves, tackling some of the more complex problems of authorship of more of the NT books. Still, it's quite good and worth your time to read no matter which side of the fence you're on.
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