Customer Reviews


490 Reviews
5 star:
 (192)
4 star:
 (75)
3 star:
 (63)
2 star:
 (56)
1 star:
 (104)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favorable review
The most helpful critical review


145 of 160 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Everything I had hoped for the Blu
I figure if one is reading this they already know the film and are questioning whether to buy this upgraded version or not - I would have to say a resounding yes.

Knowing how he filmed this and with what equipment I had very high expectations on clarity. I tested this thoroughly by pause checking over 50 different scenes and light levels (dark, dim, bright,...
Published on September 4, 2009 by Steve Kuehl

versus
19 of 24 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Probably comes off differently on the big screen...
I watched this movie on DVD, and that probably made a difference in my experience. With that said, I found this movie very poetic and beautiful, but rather slow moving and in need of editing.

On the plus side, I admire Colin Farrell, who always offers a powerful performance, and newcomer Q'orianka Kilcher was marvelous and has enormous potential for future...
Published on December 23, 2006 by Tim Warneka


‹ Previous | 1 249 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

145 of 160 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Everything I had hoped for the Blu, September 4, 2009
This review is from: The New World (The Extended Cut) [Blu-ray] (Blu-ray)
I figure if one is reading this they already know the film and are questioning whether to buy this upgraded version or not - I would have to say a resounding yes.

Knowing how he filmed this and with what equipment I had very high expectations on clarity. I tested this thoroughly by pause checking over 50 different scenes and light levels (dark, dim, bright, motion, fine detail, etc.) and I could not find fault in anything; The running water scenes, moving pans through trees - all of it. The colors, contrasts and light level all came across beautifully. The smaller LCD panels looked wonderful, but I even scrutinized on the larger Plasmas and it still looked awesome. The sound has the TrueHD and English 5.1, and the mix maintains being able to crank up the volume above normal listening levels as to immerse in the sounds/music but still hear the dialogue adequately.

This is the 172 minute version with the 10 part documentary series from the other releases included. I am very happy with this preservation so I hope that those who enjoy his work will appreciate this package.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


32 of 35 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Sweeping visions and grand history in a story of obsessive and mature love., January 23, 2007
By 
C. B Collins Jr. (Atlanta, GA United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: The New World (DVD)
The tale of the English settlers at Jamestown gets a wonderful retelling here revealing the hunger, struggle, disease, hardship, cold, and superstition that the early settlers encountered in the new world. I actually think this film does a wonderful job of revealing the wonderful paradise that was the new world before the arrival of the Europeans. The native people here are shown as primitive aboriginals, complete with tatoos, rituals, a power hierarchy and complex societies. The views of Virginia are stunning in their beauty, what a wonderful sight Virginia must have been to these early European arrivals, and how dreadful their lives could become as they learned how to survive in a world full of plants, insects, and animals they had never encountered before. The film gets 4 stars for giving us a glimpse of what the encounters between the old and new world must have been like for all parties involved.

The love story between John Smith and Pocahontas is dream-like, a world not unlike Adam and Eve in the Garden of Eden. Yet the story is one of JOhn Smith's betrayal of Pocahontas and the incredible price she pays for her loyalty to him. Yet the film is also one of her recovery from this obsessive love so that she is free to accept the love of her husband, John Rolfe. Colin Farrell does a great job of playing the brash, brave, adventurer John Smith. Smith sees the time he and Pocahontas were in love in her father's village as a dream that he must leave behind. She on the other hand saw it as a reality that she wished to pursue to the end.

Thus in some ways the film is also about obsessive first love and the strong mature love that holds relationships together for decades. Christian Bale plays Rolfe, a tobacco farmer, who loves and marries Pocahontas, and fears losing her to Smith, but is finally rewarded in the end when she realizes that Smith was an obsession that is now passing and she must cling to the true love of her life, her partner, Rolfe.

I found the Wagner music grand, sweeping, and perfect for the grandeur that is found in North America. This is a tale told with images rather than words. It is well done and not typical.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


248 of 297 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Terrence Malick's Counterpart To The Thin Red Line, It's Beautiful, Visually Stunning, & Poetic, January 25, 2006
By 
Kaya Savas (Studio City, CA) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
MOVIE: Terrence Malick is not a mainstream director, his films while few in number, are incredibly rich with detail and visual language. Only a very few people can appreciate one of his films, mostly because they tend to run longer than mainstream movies and they don't follow the traditional formula. If you've seen The Thin Red Line then you know what a Terrence Malick film is. The Thin Red Line is in my opinion one of the finest cinematic accomplishmensts in the war genre. The New World is basically Malick's counterpart to The Thin Red Line. While The Thin Red Line was a look into the dark nature of mankind and how we destroy ourselves, The New World is the opposite of that. This film is about the celebration of the human spirit and the wonder of life. It is a truly poetic film that uses the story of John Smith and Pocahontas to express this commentary. The New World focuses on the clash of differences between two civilizations and how in the mess of differences two people are able to connect and see the beauty of each other. The movie moves slow though, and there are some parts where I found the editing to be a little confusing. Otherwise, I think the film is an incredible emotional journey filled with poetry and brilliant cinematic images. This film and The Thin Red Line are very similar in style. Malick even uses the same motif with birds as he does in The Thin Red Line. You also have the poetic narration of the main characters, and the narration itself can stand alone as poetry, it is truly remarkable. Beautiful landcapes captured brilliantly with the camera, long tracking shots, and many wide shots enhance the surrounding for the audience. He also uses his "sun through the trees" shot multiple times, which I personally loved in The Thin Red Line and even used it a couple times in my projects. All the shots are accompanied by James Horner's acceptable yet somewhat flawed score. In my opinion I thought the score sounded exactly like his work on The Perfect Storm. I was devestated when Hans Zimmer was detached from the project due to scheduling problems, because it was with The Thin Red Line that Zimmer composed his masterpiece. Horner does a good job in my opinion, but at times I felt like it was all too similar and sometimes lacking. The characters are all wonderfully expressed as well, and the change that Pocahontas goes through basically defines the film's central theme of change in surrounding while still retaining your individual personality. This film celebrates humanity and is his counterpart to The Thin Red Line, which basically shows the flaws of humanity. See both film if you have not already, and if you are new to Terrence Malick please have an open mind. This man is a wonderful filmmaker, I wish he wasn't so elusive and would actually do interviews as well do maybe more than 1 movie every decade. Then again, the fact that he has only directed 5 movies in his career since 1969 maybe is his greatest strength, and puts him on the list of top directors in the industry.

ACTING: The film is almost absent of any structural dialogue. Dialogue between characters is rare and brief yet oh so meaningful, and then there is the poetic narration. The actors do a fine job with facial expressions and evoking the right emotions. Colin Farrell is great and plays a character who is in love with Pocahontas and embraces her world. Christian Bale does a fantastic job as the man who falls in love with Pocahontas yet tries to make part of English society. Then we have newcomer Q'Orianka Kilcher who plays Pocahontas, and does an amazing job with the role. The acting is all emotion and hardly any dialogue.

BOTTOM LINE: I talked to my parents after I saw the film, they said that people walked out of the movie at the showing they saw, which didn't suprise me at all. I was happy that no one walked out of the showing I went to. The Thin Red Line got the same response by movie goers that this one is getting. They walk in expecting an intense action drama and end up at a poetry reading, but you can blame decieving marketing for that. Like I said, Terrence Malick isn't for everyone, but if you see it with an open mind you will experience a truly amazing and meaningful film.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


244 of 299 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Dreams, December 30, 2005
By 
MICHAEL ACUNA (Southern California United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
"It seems like a dream." So intones John Smith (an emphatic and forceful Colin Farrell) describing his time with Pocahontas (a gorgeous newcomer, Q'Orianka Kilcher) in what would come to be known as Jamestown, Virginia circa 1607.
And so much like a dream is Terence Malick's newest "The New World." There are long stretches of this film in which there is only action without or with minimal sound: the Native Americans going about their day-to-day lives, working, playing, training, eating and celebrating while the King James sent Englishmen, looking for a quick way from England to the "Indies," basically go about their day scavenging for food, fighting amongst themselves and acting like savages. In fact, the Native Americans are mostly gorgeous, clean, well groomed while the supposedly civilized Englishmen are smelly, scuffy and ill-mannered. One of the funniest scenes comes at the beginning of the film when a Warrior approaches Captain Newport (Christopher Plummer) and squinches his nose due to the Captain's body odor. There is no doubt that the peaceful, though wary and intelligent Natives as presented here: regal, civilized are superior to the intruders.
In a mesmerizing almost stuperous mist, in a land so new and fresh and rife with possibilities, where a man can begin again without the sins of his past encroaching upon and stifling him, Malick sets the scene for the beginning of "The New World." There is such wonder, giddiness and hope in Malick's mise en scene that you can't help but be taken in by it all: what a chance we had to build a better world, what a chance we had to right the wrongs of our former world.
The central story is the one between Princess Pocahontas ("playful one") and Captain John Smith who arrives in Jamestown in shackles and is almost hung for treason but Captain Newport thinks better of it and instead sends Smith on a journey up the river to find and pay respects to Chief Powhatan. Powhatan instructs Smith to teach Pocahontas English and from this a romance develops.
Malick takes his time telling this story and "The New World" is slow, quiet, often silent and elegiac: he takes the time to stop, observe and ponder what his camera is showing...no quick jump cuts here to keep us supposedly impatient viewers interested. The world of Malick's films is a world filled with innocence and wonder: but wonder and innocence tempered with the realities of the brutal and the unforgiving. We are in Paradise here, Paradise before the fall: the fall is inevitable, of course and there is no doubt on whose doorstep the fault can be laid.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


12 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent Extension to the Original!, November 18, 2009
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: The New World (The Extended Cut) [Blu-ray] (Blu-ray)
I'm not going to review the plot or the synopsis or The New World as a movie, because there are other reviews for that. I clearly enjoyed the movie and I won't argue with those who didn't. I'm simply going to review the Blu-ray quality and the extension to the original.

VIDEO (5/5)
Five stars on the video, out of five. The picture is absolutely incredible. The Oscar nomination for cinematography, the move being shot on film (no special effects, CGI, etc), and Terrence Malick's choice of not using any artificial lighting, make the video absolutely spectacular and real. It couldn't be better. Out of my collection, this was the one Blu-ray we chose to use to go and find the perfect HDTV for my grandparents in the last couple of weeks. We even brought it up against Danny Boyle's Sunshine (on Blu-ray as well), which is known for its incredible picture quality, and this movie was truly the victor. The picture is as real and as pure as it gets. I can't say that enough. When viewing on an HDTV, these huge wide shots really make you feel like you're there. You could reach out and touch the dew on the grass. The sunsets are colorful and enormous. Every random fly buzzing around, every bead of sweat, and every subtle facial expression can be seen. You'll notice things you hadn't seen before - in a lot of scenes there is a gentle drizzle of rain, there's a lot of goings about in the background of shots, too, like pilgrims working in the distance, natives playing with their children, etc. This edition has the most pristine picture out of any Blu-ray I have seen yet. The sharpness and lighting and quality... it's just brilliant!

AUDIO (4/5)
This edition should ONLY be played on surround sound. Listening to this on our TV's speakers was just terrible. This movie has an immense amount of sound. The cellos and basses from Wagner's Vorspiel, the rush of the river and streams, the rocking of the wood on ships, combined with the subtle, whispered overlay of Pocahontas's narration... There are so many different, lush sounds in this movie that having them projected from just two speakers creates an overload that I wouldn't suggest experiencing. Certain things that need to be heard get overpowered, so please listen on surround. Audio gets a (4/5) because the Blu-ray lacked sufficient audio options (English only, English & Spanish subtitles, 5.1 only).

FEATURES (N/A)
This edition is lacking any additional features from the DVD.

EXTENSION (5/5)
Wonderful extension! The scenes are scattered throughout the film in a very balanced manner. We start to see them immediately in longer underwater shots at the beginning of the film. I would note that there's a little nudity in these scenes, too, so just a little warning if you plan on watching it with kids. The most notable aspects of the extension are the addition of scenes (complete scenes, not just longer shots) we had never seen before further into the film. I won't spoil the movie, but the extensions are great and give a deeper look inside the relationship between Smith and Pocahontas. They are also placed in other areas of the film, not necessarily to show us something we were missing or needed to know, but to throw us into the film, to give it more life. I found the additional scenes wonderful, giving time for us to experience the people and their story, mainly in parts where the previous edition seemed to rush through. When Smith is sent back to Jamestown, for instance, we feel almost like he did. We feel a stronger sense of time with the natives and had nearly completely forgotten about his fellow settlers. There is even some more narration that gives us some characterizing thoughts from the characters. The only con with the extension is the score - during the additional shots the soundtrack seems to lapse into some quasi-dreamlike drone, which after repeat viewings seems out-of-character for the film.

All in all, this is the best Blu-ray currently in my collection. The video is, dare I say, perfect. Seriously, play this Blu-ray edition next to another Blu-ray and you will be blown away at how great the picture is on this. I would suggest you buy. Quick shipment from Amazon and wonderful price. Best Buy had this for $40. At the time of this review, you can purchase this masterpiece for $10.99.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


28 of 34 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Not what you may have expected., May 9, 2006
By 
This review is from: The New World (DVD)
I remember about a year ago when I saw the previews to this movie while at the local cinema. "Oooooo," I thought, "I can't wait for this to come out!" Well, I waited and waited and waited and still nothing ever came out. To my surprise, I discovered earlier this spring that it had already had its run at the box office and apparently none of the cinemas here in Memphis, TN. desired to carry it. So . . . I waited for the DVD to come out and rushed out to Circuit City to grab it on the morning of its release. I was full of anticipation all the way home about how good this "historical" movie was going to be. Would it be like "Braveheart," or "The Patriot," or maybe "Troy," or even "King Arthur" or "Alexander"? So I settled down and waited for the intense action and suspense to unfold. And I waited and I waited and I waited!

If you, like me, are under the impression that this movie is an "epic" telling or re-telling of history, or if you desire the intensity of action then you had better look elsewhere. For all of these reasons I was totally disappointed. Yet, you might ask why I would give it a 5 star review. Hmmmmm, well let's see. This movie is great for one, even if it is completely NOT what I expected.

At the center of this movie is a love story. In fact, it's more of a love story that just so happens to be set in 17th-century Virginia rather than a movie based on the founding of Jamestown that just so happens to include a love story. Does this make any sense? I've read a few other reviews that call this movie "poetic" and I can't agree more, although I've never really thought of a motion picture as being "poetic." If we want to run with the poetry analogy then I'll say that this is more of a "Tintern Abbey" than a "Rime of the Ancient Mariner." It's a "Dover Beach" as opposed to a "Dulce et Decorum Est." In other words, it's subtle, reflective, surreal, and even pensive. Sure there are a few short battle sequences, but it is centered more around the spoken thoughts of Pochahantas/Rebecca, John Smith, and John Rolfe. It's sort of a dramatic monologue if we wish to keep the poetry analogy alive.

While Christian Bale and Colin Farrell occasionally give convincing portrayals of brave, adventurous explorers, it is not really this aspect of their character that is highlighted. Instead, we delve into the innermost confines of each character's soul as this movie unfolds. We see firsthand the inevitable UNcompatibility of European and Native cultures and how diificult it truly must have been for the earliest settlers of this country. Indeed, the movie places quite a bit of emphasis on the harsh conditions faced by these first settlers and actually exposes the pitiable circumstances that rendered them virtually helpless. One may stop and wonder if we could do the same thing today. Who for the love of God would leave England with it's bountiful fields, lush gardens, paved streets, and brick houses with glass windows for the rustic "stick and mud" abodes of the New World? The contrast between the two worlds is certainly striking from the European perspective.

I had high hopes of showing this movie to my high school class, and I suspected it would be worthwhile for a U.S. history class or an English class that focuses on American literature. I suspect, however, that most adolescent minds will be bored to tears with this one. While I can't wholeheartedly recommend that you go and buy it today, I will insist upon at least a trip to Blockbuster for a weekend rental.

Again (and pardon me for sounding arrogant), this is a "thinking person's" movie. If you want action and adventure, then buy "The Patriot" or "The Last of the Mohicans."
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "Not like any other movie. A masterpiece." - San Francisco Chronicle, April 22, 2010
By 
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: The New World (The Extended Cut) [Blu-ray] (Blu-ray)
This is the blurb on the back of the BD case and I agree with it to a great extent. I also agree that this film had a misleading advertising campaign, including this BD, which shows two shots of Farrell wielding a sword to fight Powhatans. Pocahontas should have figured prominently on the cover and in the advertising, as this is mostly her story, as she symbolizes the indigenous peoples who embody the natural pre-colonized America, and in turn represent humanity living in harmony with nature.

Smith and Rolfe are the other corners of the love triangle. Smith represents the conquering aspect of European empires and of humanity in general. Rolfe is probably the character we most readily relate to, as he ethically works within the realities he faces, prefiguring the modern citizen of the developed world. Malick crafts a moving picture poem, bringing us from our grade school knowledge of history to a heightened awareness of the amazing power of these events, what they represent, and how they set in motion the story of America.

Video quality is excellent, a worthy transfer for a stunningly beautifully film. Audio quality is also very good but I found the internal monologue voice-overs difficult to hear sometimes. The one extra is an extensive making-of documentary from which Malick is curiously absent. It focuses mainly on how the filmmakers strove for cultural authenticity and historical accuracy.

THE NEW WORLD stands with milestones in art cinema like BARAKA, KOYAANISQATSI, and 2001. Layers of meaning and symbolism are revealed in repeated viewings as we face the bittersweet realities of living in this new world.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


29 of 37 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Some thoughts on Malick's "Indian Princess", March 25, 2006
This review is from: The New World (DVD)
Some may find irony in Terrence Malick's films, but never cynicism. In The New World he hasn't fashioned his version of the events in Virginia 1607 to comply with any prescriptions derived from our zeitgeist for how such historically and ethnically sensitive material should be treated by a non-"Indian" (the term of self-reference by tribal people, according to Scott Momaday). And, is that even possible? In practice history can never be recovered, "correctly" or otherwise, only remade afresh each time for present intent, by which every genuine artist indeed answers a different muse, outside consensus.

The New World's storyline is so well-covered by others, that I ask the kind indulgence of readers to allow me a few points of discussion, and mostly notes at that. (Also, there may be SPOILERS.)

[ Innocence ] The Indian maiden (her name unspoken) pleads for Captain Smith's life after he's captured and presented by her tribe to her father. He is freed, and despite her father's warning counsel, she is drawn into an arising bond of deep love with Smith through some causal transformation, which has occurred in him as well. They become as two children: there is smiling delight, innocent oblivion, courtesy and respect, silence. There is physical touch, yet no sexual overtones, just tenderness and a becoming shyness, as in a true(r) courtship. She is very young after all. Of this propriety Malick leaves no room for doubt.

[ The Other: Singular ] Also evident and striking about their encounter is that its inherent purity is quite something which one would expect to find in such a meeting with the "Other" (with what is usually perceived to be completely unlike, foreign, often unwelcome or threatening); that is, when the transforming ability of that encounter is indeed enabled by openness, willingness to accept, and by inborn natural curiosity (when not typically repressed), allowing one to move forward towards that Other. In our world, "Other" represents difficult challenges psychologically and emotionally for many people, in coming to terms with accepting much which is foreign, culturally or otherwise. The radical liberation of this central meeting in the film might well shift perspectives for many, at the very least subconsciously.

[ The Other: Plural ] Much has been made of the "betrayal" by Pocahontas of her people (historically), and being cast out by her father. While that occurs here, Malick's insistence on honoring the importance of individual over collective experience allows him to provide insight: not only are the Indian "princess" and Captain Smith able to effect their love for the Other in the singular; it will allow them to further embrace the Other in the plural, as when he intimately bonds with her kin, and when she later enlists those very kinsfolk to bring food and provisions to the English settlers, starving in midwinter. If the underlying dynamic of embracing the Other is clear, it becomes difficult to establish a convincing claim for a pure betrayal on her part. Indeed, she is shown in her continual loyalty as she returns to her father every time she has stepped out of favor while following the inner urgings of her heart, until he sends her away. Could she really choose between her community and Smith? His judgment reestablishes her humility, but it's also importantly on view when she supplicates the spirit of her dead mother who, as becomes apparent, is her true life guide, the only one we see her turning to, before and after this abandonment.

[ The Individual ] For Malick there is again an opportunity to show clearly, within the individual/collective context, what is important about the maiden's position. The love for one's parents and community must be deep, yet it comes naturally, without question. However, when love for the Other arises, who can say it may not prove to be the greater, more powerful one? The one that opens, transforms, removes limitations, and matures someone ineffably, and is greater than those involved. Tragically, an opportunity for even a minimal encounter with the Other, between natives and settlers, would be impossible for a long time. However, Malick preempts any manipulation to make us register either "poor unfortunate naturals" or "disgusting new colonials." Instead he encourages empathy: to see both sides with compassion, to honor every person's suffering. The film appears primarily the story of one individual, the Indian maiden, yet while upholding the singular importance of her experience, Malick enables a deeper insight: that nations, tribes, races, people do not suffer. Only individuals suffer. "The People," -- that blind ideological production -- never existed, only individuals exist, which is sometimes unbearable to see because it is precisely at the level of the individual that one most uncompromisingly confronts the Other.

[ Transcendence ] The New World is a transcendent experience, not because of its soul-glimpses (in voice-overs) or nature's endless majesty on view (although its scope, colors and sounds do manifest a different overwhelming sense of Otherness). The movement forward of Rebecca (newly named) through further abandonment by Smith, further surrender as captive Other, further encounter, courtship and marriage to Rolfe, into the blossoming of motherhood: all allow her to know new life at every stage, including her own suffering, from innocent purity and deepening spiritual reliance to the maturity of clear discernment. A last meeting with Smith, a farewell, her final certain embrace of Rolfe... is there more to know -- for her, or for us?

The new world for Smith was not Virginia, nor England for her. It is never the outer, external one. Malick offers this knowledge most intimately, his very invitation to transcendence, and his art is genuine in this knowing.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Extended Version is Far Far Better, November 29, 2008
The 171 minute extended version is far better then the original 135 minute version. The extra 36 minutes are pretty evenly distributed through out the film from beginning to end and make the narrative such as it is much easiler to follow. There are also a few intertitles introducting various sections of the film. Pocahontas gets significantly more screen time so there is more oppportunity for her character to develop. If you recall the trailers for this film you may well remember many scenes which were simply not in the 135 minute version and I can tell you most of them are now in the extended version. Overall a big improvement though those who really hated the film probably still won't be won over, but those in the middle may well give it a higher rating. Too bad there are not more films about about early American Colonial history and for that alone this movie is worth seeing at least once.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


14 of 17 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A tribute to innocence, March 12, 2006
This review is from: The New World (DVD)
In the midst of blockbuster oriented and purely commercial and consumerist film making comes this hauntingly beautiful piece of poetic cinema that dares to be different. Legendary film maker Terrence Malick was never a person to follow mainstream film making and his long absence from the craft has proven rewarding, with first the award winning and brilliantly acted Thin Red Line and now this gentle and gorgeously filmed meditation on nature, love and civilization.

In the 17.century a group of English colonists, ravaged by disease and hunger, land at the North American shore, of what is later to become Virginia. Stranded in an absolutely strange and hostile environment, oblivious to the natives and their culture, not knowing whether they are regarded as hostile intruders or a mere curiosity, they soon and under extreme hardship and losses establish a colonial outpost, the famous James town. Among them is Soldier and Adventurer John Smith, who is to be hanged for rebellion and mutiny. However, realizing that every man is needed for survival, especially a man as skilled and experienced as John Smith,Captain Newport pardons him, sending him and a few companions as an emissary to a powerful and mysterious Native Chief. The mission prooves nearly suicidal as Smith becomes the only survivor,brought back to chief Powhatan as a prisoner, desperately trying to negotiate with artefacts he has brought with him,such as an ivory compass.On the advice of his suspicious chief advisor, an imposing Wes Studi, Powhatan decides to execute Smith but spares his life, when his beloved daughter pleads for the captive. This girl is of course the legendary Pocahontas,the soul and essence of the film and almost ethereally portrayed by Q'Orianka Kilcher,but her Native name is never pronounced.It is her who exposes John Smith to the humanity of the strangers,to their lack of hate and envy, to their innocence and simplicity. She becomes a beacon to the world weary man, who sees in her the purity and goodness that his people and culture and even himself seem to lack. He falls in love with her person, just as much as what she represents. This love, a pure almost nonsexual passion, will overshadow all tragedies,conflicts and losses that are to overwhelm both their destinies and that of their people.

Although the film contains surprisingly little dialogue,often explaining the motives of the main characters by streams of consciousness, the presence of the powerful cast,especially the heart wrenching performance of beautiful Q'Orianka Kilcher, including the breathtaking cinematography and the fitting natural score by James Horner,make this film a worthwhile and moving experience.This film has the experimental nature of a dream and is a passionate tribute to human and also nature's innocence. Terence Malick has surely succeeded, seeing that his film is evidently more touching,artistic and thoughtful that most of what has been shown in cinema for a long time.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 249 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

Details

The New World (The Extended Cut) [Blu-ray]
The New World (The Extended Cut) [Blu-ray] by Terrence Malick (Blu-ray - 2009)
Used & New from: $28.29
Add to wishlist See buying options
Search these reviews only
Send us feedback How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you? Let us know here.