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The Man Nobody Knows Paperback – April 18, 2000


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 128 pages
  • Publisher: Ivan R. Dee (April 18, 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1566632943
  • ISBN-13: 978-1566632942
  • Product Dimensions: 8.4 x 5.5 x 0.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 6.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (27 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #98,211 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

His themes are, ahem, resurrected by businessmen who seek to enumerate the most common problems in business. (Kim Phillips-Fein The American Prospect)

Barton is a pioneer in public relations...by making Jesus the founder of modern business. (Richard N. Ostilling Philadelphia Tribune)

From the Publisher

When it was originally published in 1925, the book topped the nonfiction bestseller list. Its lessons for the modern businessman are even more compelling today. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

Evey one should read The man nobody knows, and than they should get to know him.
Carol wilson-Mack
I was required to read this for a college class and I am very glad I got the chance to find this gem.
H. Reidy
The author makes his points powerfully forever changing the way I look at Jesus and his life.
William Tewelow

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

29 of 34 people found the following review helpful By Seth Zajac on December 19, 2001
Format: Mass Market Paperback
In his second major work, The Man Nobody Knows, author Bruce Barton portrays Jesus Christ as a salesman--not an ordinary salesman, but the world's greatest salesman--and exhorts
readers to profit by his example. Additionally, the story of the carpenter from Nazareth, Barton argues, is "the story of the founder of modern business (12).
Throughout the book, Barton paints Christ in a positive color. He disavows the "wicked falsehood that [Christ] never laughed" (23), from inference of the New Testament--the men who
became his disciples never would have been attracted to a man who demonstrated Miltonian characteristics. Further, Barton comments on Christ's leadership, as "only strong magnetic men
inspire great enthusiasm and build strong orginizations. Yet Jesus built the greatest orginization of all...He picked up twelve men from the bottom ranks of business and forged them into an orginization that conquered the world" (35-36). This act could have only been done by a supreme business executive, a man who knew how to persuade others, and was so passionate in his
rhetoric that men would be willing to give their lives for his cause. Hence, Christ was the greatest salesman of all.
Finally, through the use of scripture, Barton demonstrates Christ's ultimate leadership qualities during Christ's cruxifiction. As Christ was hanging on the cross, one of the thieves painfully asked that Christ remember him when Jesus returns to his kingdom. Barton believes this was Christ's greatest act of leadership, as "there have been leaders who could call forth enthusiasm when their fortunes ran high. But [Christ], when his enemies had done their worst, so bore himself that a crucifed felon looked into his dying eyes and saluted him as king" (220).
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Mark Twain on November 10, 2012
Format: Paperback
Comrade McAllister's review below, "Astonishing This Chestnut is Still Around," has nothing to do with this book (The Man Nobody Knows, by Bruce Barton). It is as if he didn't read it, much less understand its profound and deeply moral meaning. The message of this book is dead set against what McAllister sees as the "gluttony of corporate America." Indeed, Bruce Barton says repeatedly that those who seek long term success must first be willing to "lose themselves at the bottom" - in humble, spiritually enriching service to their fellow man. The few men of history (besides Jesus) who Barton characterizes as "great", are not CEOs and Wall Street bankers, but world leaders, scientists, etc (Asoka, Abraham Lincoln, Francis Bacon) who gave us a higher vision.

McAllister also concedes an all-too-common, perverted, Marxian understanding of Jesus' message. Jesus' admonition that the rich "give their money away" to find the kingdom of Heaven, was not an attack on money itself as something inherently evil, but an allegorical attack on the love of money eclipsing the love of God. Indeed, like Barton, Jesus valued monetary gain if acquired with an open, self-reliant, service-oriented heart. This message is obvious in Jesus' parable of the talents, in which 3 servants are given talents/money by their master (i.e. God) to manage in his absense. The servant who multiplied his talents the most through creative, industrious effort is rewarded/praised the most by the master. And the servant who added no profit to his talents is castigated as lazy and wicked. Thus rings Christ's truism, "To those who have shall more be given, but to those who have not, even what they have will be taken away.
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10 of 12 people found the following review helpful By H. Reidy on May 22, 2009
Format: Paperback
I think some people wrote their reviews without reading the book. If you judge it by only the chapter titles or the text on the front of the book, you are really missing out. I was required to read this for a college class and I am very glad I got the chance to find this gem. For anyone interested in the life and works of Jesus or just love to read a good book that makes you rethink things, definitely check this one out.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Ron Titus on July 26, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I wanted to read what a book written in 1925 on Christ would have to say. I was surprised that this was such an inspiring book. It took a perspective that I'd simply not thought of before. It was well written, incisive and drew some surprising, but accurate conclusions I'd never arrived at previously.

I do recommend this volume.

Also, I must recommend the Amazon seller I got it from: TheGokorosama. Description was precise, delivery unusually speedy, and I felt I was given a personal recommendation from the Seller. Thanks.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By robinrjohn on January 15, 2014
Format: Library Binding Verified Purchase
I first found this book in an antiques/junk shop years ago. The title caught my attention. I have been for years a "self-help" junkie, reading all kinds of books that offer advice for strength, improvement, enlightenment. And, inevitably, all these wanderings led to spiritual seeking, had to. And so I found myself reading anything I could about Jesus.... "Mere Christianity", by C.S. Lewis; a book called "Barabbus" (about the man who was "let go" at the crowd's insistence, instead of Christ) for example. This book, by a long-deceased advertising man, Bruce Barton, is his attempt to "personalize" Christ, as the scriptures leave quite a bit to our imagination. I loved this book, because it helped me to focus on the "man" Jesus, as he walked among men. I lent it to someone and never got it back. In fact, I've lent two copies and never had them returned. And so, luckily, I found it in print again. If anyone out there is seeking, I have a copy.
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